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High aerobic fitness in late adolescence is associated with reduced risk of heart attack

High aerobic fitness in late adolescence is associated with reduced risk of heart attack | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Aims Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and signs of atherosclerosis are present in all large arteries already in adolescence. We investigated the association between high physical fitness in late adolescence and myocardial infarction (MI) later in life.

Methods and results The study cohort comprised 743,498 Swedish men examined at the age of 18 years during conscription 1969–84. Aerobic fitness (Wmax) and muscle strength at conscription were measured. During follow-up period of 34 years, 11,526 MIs were registered in the cohort. After adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), diseases, education, blood pressure, and socio-economic factors, one standard deviation increase in the level of physical fitness was associated with an 18% decreased risk of later MI.  The beneficial effects of Wmax were significant across all recognized BMI groups, ranging from lean (BMI < 18.5) to obese (BMI > 30) (P < 0.05 for all). However, obese men (BMI > 30) in the highest fourth of Wmax had a higher risk of MI than did lean men (BMI < 18.5) in the highest (HR 4.6, 95% CI 1.9–11.2), and lowest (HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2–2.6) fourth of Wmax.

Conclusions We report a significant graded association between aerobic fitness in late adolescence and MI later in life in men. However, obese men with a high aerobic fitness had a higher risk of MI than lean men with a low aerobic fitness.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

The impact of overweight status and fitness status (both aerobic and strength) in 18 yo men,  predicted heart attack over the next 3 decades.  Although both are important, as can be seen in the graphic, the impact of overweight status (fatness) was of greater risk than being "unfit".  Fatness worse than unfitness.

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Jenny Han's curator insight, December 13, 5:55 AM

Graph shows what we should learn.

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The Benefits of Exercising Outdoors

The Benefits of Exercising Outdoors | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

While the allure of the gym — climate-controlled, convenient and predictable — is obvious, especially in winter, emerging science suggests there are benefits to exercising outdoors that can’t be replicated on a treadmill, a recumbent bicycle or a track.

But the take-away seems to be that moving their routines outside could help reluctant or inconsistent exercisers. “If outdoor activity encourages more activity, then it is a good thing,” After all, “despite the fitness industry boom,”  “we are not seeing changes in national physical activity levels, so gyms are not the answer.”

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:
Studies suggest that exercising outdoors may offer advantages to working out at a gym because:

Outdoor exercise tends to be more strenuous than indoor exercise.

 

People tend to enjoy outdoor exercise more.

 

People tend to exercise harder when exercising outdoors.

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The BioSync Team's curator insight, March 1, 2013 9:08 PM

Recently finished a 6 week Qigong workshop outside - rain or shine - with a master from China!


Read More:   http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/21/the-benefits-of-exercising-outdoors/?ref=health

nancercize's comment, March 21, 2013 10:31 PM
And there are many studies supporting a connection between outdoors, nature, and reduced stress, improved concentration, and mood. More advantages!
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The Couch-to-5K ® Running Plan | C25K Mobile App

The Couch-to-5K ® Running Plan | C25K Mobile App | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Follow the Couch to 5K running plan or use our C25K mobile app to go from couch to your very first 5K. Follow this beginner training schedule and sign up for a 5K race.
Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

The couch to 5K strategy is a great program for those looking to become more fit and active. The online and web version guides for C25K are user friendly and I can endorse them personally having recently completed my first 5K.  If you're over 50 see your doctor first.

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Alacia Romack's curator insight, January 19, 10:58 PM

This gives great structure for someone who hasn't ever trained for a 5K before. You can follow it as closely or as loosely as you'd like, but it gives a great start and something to work off of.

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Misfit Shine: an elegant, wireless activity tracker

Misfit Shine: an elegant, wireless activity tracker | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

For those who want a new option for tracking activity. A new option with great promise.  It can even be used to track activity while swimming (don't try that with your smart phone).  It's about the size of 3 stacked quarters.  It's iPhone compatible and synchs with the iPhone by laying it on the screen.  No wireless, no cables. How they do that?

This new technology is for those looking for connected health #cHealth that is seamless (hence wearable) and provides meaningful data that can be used to track health and fitness parameters longitudinally.

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Things you should never say to someone trying to lose weight

Things you should never say to someone trying to lose weight | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

I'm doing this the old-fashioned way by eating healthy and exercising. Plain and simple. I know these comments come from a place of love -- the people I've heard these from mean well. It just comes out wrong and winds up bugging me. So without further ado, here are the things I "nevah evah nevah" want to hear again about my loss of 45+ pounds:

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Why running slow isn't bad

Why running slow isn't bad | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Boston Globe blogger counters arguments that runnng slow is useless and how this criticism and negative comments previously discouraged her from running at all,  Get Moving!

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The Real Promise of Mobile Health Apps: Scientific American

The Real Promise of Mobile Health Apps: Scientific American | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Take Home Message: These cool apps are not ready for prime time but have great potential.

 

The director of NIH, Francis Collins gives his optimistic view that Mobile devices have the potential to become powerful medical tools. Cell phones and wireless sensors to gather & access health data has grown quickly in recent years. Popular mHealth apps are used for counting calories, gauging nutrition, tracking workouts, calculating body mass index and quitting smoking.These worthy efforts pale next to the potential of mHealth to aid in medical research and health care.

Maintaining privacy and security of health data is a challenge that calls for research. 

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CARDIORESPIRATORY FITNESS AND SHORT TERM OUTCOMES WITH CORONARY ARTERY BYPASS GRAFT SURGERY

CARDIORESPIRATORY FITNESS AND SHORT TERM OUTCOMES WITH CORONARY ARTERY BYPASS GRAFT SURGERY | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Pre-operative risk assessment for coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) has been evaluated with multiple predictive models; yet none incorporate low cardiorespiratory fitness as a risk factor. The present study evaluates pre-operative metabolic equivalents (METs) and short term morbidity and mortality after CABG.

Patients undergoing CABG from January 2002 to December 2010 at Beaumont Health Systems were reviewed for peak or symptom-limited stress testing < 90 days prior to surgery. METs were estimated from the achieved treadmill speed, grade, and duration, or the cycle ergometer workload corrected for body weight.

596 patients were categorized into 2 groups: those with low aerobic capacity (<5 METs); and those achieving = 5 METs. Fisher's exact tests compared pre-operative aerobic capacity and post-operative morbidity and mortality between the two groups (Table 1). After adjusting for potential confounding variables, we found an inverse relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness and complications after CABG.

Low pre-operative cardiorespiratory fitness was associated with higher operative mortality, 30 day mortality, sternal wound infections, and prolonged ventilation after CABG. These data suggest that pre-operative cardiorespiratory fitness provides an independent and additive marker of prognosis after CABG that has not been previously reported.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

Using this simple metric there was a dramatic difference in death rates in patients having coronary bypass.  If a patient could walk just 5 minutes on the treadmill then there death rate was 1% after bypass surgery in this study.  Those patients who could not get to the fifth minute had a death rate of 5%.  This absolute difference is significant and another reason to recommend efforts at fitness.

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Hard-Wired to Hate Exercise?

Hard-Wired to Hate Exercise? | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Discipline and motivation aside, researchers are looking at the physiological reasons behind why some people enjoy exerting themselves and others don't.

When it comes to exercise, many people seem to fall into two distinct camps: those who love a vigorous, sweat-soaked workout and those who view it as a form of torment

With hopes of getting more people up and moving, scientists are looking at the body's biological and chemical processes for clues to understanding what's behind differing attitudes toward exercise. That could mean there are factors beyond motivation and discipline to explain why some people enjoy exercising and others don't.

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Eunice Chu's curator insight, March 26, 2013 12:44 PM

Interesting perspective. May be able to help me get over my laziness:)

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Studies on Older Endurance Athletes Suggest the Fittest Reap Few Health Benefits

Studies on Older Endurance Athletes Suggest the Fittest Reap Few Health Benefits | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

My comment:  Another vote for moderation.  Being sedentary is clearly NOT healthy.  But this data suggests that "Chronic extreme exercise appears to cause excessive ‘wear-and-tear’ on the heart,”.

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A fast-emerging body of scientific evidence points to a conclusion that’s unsettling, to say the least, for a lot of older athletes: Running can take a toll on the heart that essentially eliminates the benefits of exercise. What the new research suggests is that the benefits of running may come to a hard stop later in life. In a study involving 52,600 people followed for three decades, the runners in the group had a 19% lower death rate than nonrunners, according to the Heart editorial. But among the running cohort, those who ran a lot—more than 20 to 25 miles a week—lost that mortality advantage.

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How much exercise is enough?

How much exercise is enough? | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

My comment: Here's the answer to the question => What's the least I have to do? Answer: the more you do the better.  Fitness & Fatness independently important.

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“We found that adding low amounts of physical activity to one’s daily routine, such as 75 minutes of brisk walking per week, was associated with increased longevity: a gain of 1.8 years of life expectancy after age 40, compared with doing no such activity"

We all know that exercise is good for you, but how good? While previous studies have shown the link between physical activity and a lower risk of premature mortality, the number of years of life expectancy gained among persons with different activity levels has been unclear — until now.

In a new study from Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute, researchers have quantified how many years of life are gained by being physically active at different levels, among all individuals as well as among various groups having different body mass indexes (BMI).

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Obesity May Hasten Cognitive Decline

Obesity May Hasten Cognitive Decline | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

People who are obese in middle age and who have high blood pressure and other so-called metabolic risk factors have a speedier cognitive decline as they get older than people of normal weight, according to a large study published Monday in the journal Neurology.

The study, involving 6,401 participants and spanning 10 years, adds to research indicating that obesity increases the risk of dementia later in life.

"In the last 10 years or so, people started suggesting you could be fit and fat—you could be obese and metabolically healthy and have no health risk," said Archana Singh-Manoux, lead author of the study and research director at Inserm, the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research.

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Occupy Fitness: Joining the 1%

Occupy Fitness: Joining the 1% | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

There are 10,080 minutes in a week. Can you spare 150 of them? The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) recommends that adults participate in 150 minutes of exercise a week. In essence, it is a bright idea to commit 1% of your week to moderately intense physical activity (o.k., 1.5% is more mathematically accurate, but not as “occupy” movement catchy). It really does not seem like much time.

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