Heart and Vascular Health
32.4K views | +0 today
Follow
Heart and Vascular Health
Media, News & Topics on prevention, diagnosis & treatment of cardiovascular disease
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

Are You at Risk for a Heart Attack After Exercise?

Are You at Risk for a Heart Attack After Exercise? | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Dying during or immediately after physical activity occurs rarely.  Regular exercise is a cornerstone of good health, and its long-term benefits for both longevity and protection against heart attacks, cancer and other ailments are supported in many studies. Doctors say there are strategies to reduce the already low likelihood of a workout turning into a tragedy.

The majority of sports-related sudden cardiac arrests occur among people above 35 years old. Most victims are men and most already have heart disease whether they know it or not.

“The risk is much greater for people who don’t exercise on a regular basis,. The weekend warrior who goes out to crush it once a week” or less often is much more vulnerable than the person who gets three to five cardio workouts a week.

For a sedentary middle-age person who wakes up one morning and suddenly decides to become a “lean, mean fighting machine in a month, that’s a bad idea,”  “You should make fitness a goal, but a gradual goal,” slowly increasing intensity over several weeks or more.


Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

“You can’t really use the risk of sudden death as an excuse not to exercise.”

more...
Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

Patients Who Achieve 10 Minutes During Treadmill Exercise have excellent prognosis

Patients Who Achieve 10 Minutes During Treadmill Exercise have excellent prognosis | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Patients who underwent treadmill exercise echocardiography and exercised for 9 or more minutes using th Bruce protocol (N=7236) were included. Clinical and exercise echocardiographic characteristics and outcomes were evaluated. Exercise echo results were positive for ischemia in 862 patients (12%). Extensive ischemia developed in 265 patients (4%). For patients with normal exercise echo results, all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates were 0.30% and 0.05% per person-year of follow-up, respectively. For patients who had extensive ischemia, all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates were 0.84% and 0.25% per person-year of follow-up, respectively. Patients at highest risk were those who had extensive and severe regional wall motion abnormalities at rest (n=58), and their all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates were 2.65% and 0.76% per person-year of follow-up. Exercise echocardiographic variables did not identify sizable patient subgroups at risk for death and did not provide incremental prognostic information (C statistic was 0.74 compared with 0.73 for the clinical plus exercise electrocardiography model).Conclusion  Patients achieving a workload of 10 or more metabolic equivalents during treadmill exercise testing do not often have extensive ischemic abnormalities on exercise echocardiography. Although exercise echocardiographic results provide some prognostic information, it is not of incremental value for these patients, whose short-term and medium-term prognosis is excellent.
Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

The 10 METs described are metabolic equivalents which correlate approximately with the minutes on the standard (Bruce) protocol, i.e. 10 METS is 10 minutes. Patients who can achieve this level of exercise have an "extremely low risk of death from cardiovascular disease" (5 out of 10, 000 had cardiovascular death).

The other finding is that adding imaging with echocardiogram (and implied other imaging like nuclear testing) adds little if patients achieve 10 minutes.
Most patients can achieve this level with training which includes regular walking, and can even be achieved in patients with coronary disease.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

Mental Activity and eXercise (MAX) Trial:  Trial to Enhance Cognitive Function in Older Adults

Mental Activity and eXercise (MAX) Trial:  Trial to Enhance Cognitive Function in Older Adults | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

The prevalence of cognitive impairment and dementia are projected to rise dramatically during the next 40 years, and strategies for maintaining cognitive function with age are critically needed. Physical or mental activity alone result in relatively small, domain-specific improvements in cognitive function in older adults; combined interventions may have more global effects.

Participants A total of 126 inactive, community-residing older adults with cognitive complaints.

Interventions All participants engaged in home-based mental activity (1 h/d, 3 d/wk) plus class-based physical activity (1 h/d, 3 d/wk) for 12 weeks and were randomized to either mental activity intervention (MA-I; intensive computer) or mental activity control (MA-C; educational DVDs) plus exercise intervention (EX-I; aerobic) or exercise control (EX-C; stretching and toning); a 2 × 2 factorial design was used so that there were 4 groups: MA-I/EX-I, MA-I/EX-C, MA-C/EX-1, and MA-C/EX-C.

Results Participants had a mean age of 73.4 years; 62.7% were women, and 34.9% were Hispanic or nonwhite. There were no significant differences between the groups at baseline. Global cognitive scores improved significantly over time (mean, 0.16 SD; P < .001) but did not differ between groups in the comparison between MA-I and MA-C (ignoring exercise, P = .17), the comparison between EX-I and EX-C (ignoring mental activity, P = .74), or across all 4 randomization groups (P = .26).

Conclusions and Relevance In inactive older adults with cognitive complaints, 12 weeks of physical plus mental activity was associated with significant improvements in global cognitive function.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

Another feather in the cap of exercise. The benefits on blood pressure, diabetes, cholesterol, muscle and bone strength are well known. In addition, now, this study showed a significant benefit on cognitive (thinking) ability with exercise (moderate intensity, 60 minutes, 3 x / week). There was no added benefit of mental activity such as performing games to enhance the speed and accuracy of visual and auditory processing.
Exercise: low risk, multiple benefits, low cost.

more...
Blair Kettle's curator insight, November 13, 2013 1:25 AM

"In inactive older adults with cognitive complaints, 12 weeks of physical plus mental activity was associated with significant improvements in global cognitive function"

Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

Can too much exercise harm the heart and shorten your life?

Can too much exercise harm the heart and shorten your life? | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Moderate joggers lived the longest during a 30-year study. The green bars show joggers who had a significantly lower risk of dying during the study compared with people who didn't exercise. The blue bars do not show statistically significant differences with non-joggers.

Until further studies can help physicians personalize their advice on exercise, researchers agree that the safest bet is to listen to your body and cut back if you experience pain or excessive fatigue between workouts. Many people check off marathons and triathlons from their bucket lists and then ease back into shorter workouts.

Resistance training with weights, balance exercises, and stretching also become more important as the body ages, to combat the loss of muscle mass, balance, and flexibility. “Optimal aging includes not just cardiovascular fitness but retention of overall muscle strength,” 

more...
Michael Wiener's curator insight, September 5, 2013 1:16 AM

This is very interesting as most men and women think the longer they workout, the better. It's good to know that moderate exercise can do a lot in improving health and fitness. Consuming the right types of foods at the right amount is probably the major player in maintaining ideal weight resulting to great level of physical fitness.

 

Exercising too much might not do anything good if one do not watch what he/she eats.

Alexis Dickerson's curator insight, September 22, 2013 2:41 PM

Slow, steady frequent exercise for optimal health!

Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

Exploding Myths about Exercise

Exploding Myths about Exercise | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Even when you know physical activity is good for you, it's easy to keep dragging your feet—literally. We all have reasons to stay inactive, but sometimes those reasons are based more on myth than reality. Here are some of the most common myths about physical activity and ways to replace them with a more realistic, can-do spirit.

 

=> Myth 1: "Physical activity takes too much time." Physical activity does take some time, but there are ways to make it manageable. If you don't have 30 minutes in your daily schedule for an activity break, try to find three 10-minute periods. If you're aiming for 60 minutes daily—a good goal if you're trying to avoid weight gain—perhaps you can carve out some "fitness time" early in the day, before your schedule gets too busy. Another idea is to combine physical activity with a task that's already part of your daily routine, such as walking the dog or doing yard chores.

=> Myth 2: "Getting in shape makes you tired."

Once you begin regular physical activity, you're likely to have even more energy than before. As you progress, daily tasks will seem easier. Regular, moderate-to-brisk physical activity can also help you to reduce fatigue and manage stress.

=> Myth 3: "The older you are, the less physical activity you need."

Most people become less physically active as they age, but keeping fit is important throughout life. Regular physical activity increases older people's ability to perform routine daily tasks and to stay independent longer. No matter what your age, you can find a physical activity program that is tailored to your particular fitness level and needs.

=> Myth 4: "Taking medication interferes with physical activity."

In most cases, this is not true. In fact, becoming more active may lessen your need for certain medicines, such as high blood pressure drugs. However, before beginning a physical activity program, be sure to inform your doctor about both prescription and over-the-counter medications you are taking, so that your health can be properly monitored.

=> Myth 5: "You have to be athletic to exercise." Most physical activities don't require any special athletic skills. In fact, many people who have bad memories of difficult school sports have discovered a whole world of enjoyable, healthful activities that involve no special talent or training. A perfect example is brisk walking—a superb, heart healthy activity. Others include bicycling, gardening, or yard work, as long as they're done at a brisk pace. Just do more of the activities you already like and already know how to do. It's that simple.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

NIH publication on exercise facts and fiction. 5 myths debunked.

more...
Angelo Santa Ana's curator insight, June 16, 2013 9:16 PM

Our bodies are built to move. Exercise promotes a longer, healthier, more vibrant life

Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

Only 1 in 5 Americans Gets Enough Exercise

Only 1 in 5 Americans Gets Enough Exercise | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

The news was less disappointing for aerobic exercise, with 51.6% of adults getting the recommended amount, than it was for muscle-strengthening activities, with only 29.3% getting the recommended amount.

The overall exercise rates also varied widely by state, ranging from 13% in Tennessee and West Virginia to 27% in Colorado.

The report was published in the May 3 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, a CDC publication.

"Exercise not only helps with weight management, it helps reduce anxiety and depression; boosts energy, immunity and brain power; and significantly lowers the risk for chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease," she said.

According to the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, adults should get at least:

=>  two and a half hours a week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity such as walkin

=>  or an hour and 15 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity, such as jogging.

In addition, adults should do muscle-strengthening activities, such as push-ups, sit-ups or activities using resistance bands or weights. These exercises should be done two or more days a week and work all major muscle groups, the guidelines suggested.

The highest proportion of adults meeting those guidelines were in the West (24 percent) and the Northeast (21 percent). Women, Hispanics and older and obese adults were less likely to meet the guidelines

"Simple steps to start moving include: enlisting a friend or family member to join you; taking a walk every evening after dinner; getting up and marching in place at every TV commercial; limiting TV and computer time; [and] scheduling your time to exercise in your daily calendar,

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

The authors put a positive spin on this report but half of Americans are not exercising even at these modest recommendation levels (75 minutes of vigorous exercise per week).  The muscle strengthening data is even worse: 80% of Americans are not doing it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

Baby Boomers Less Fit Than Last Generation

Baby Boomers Less Fit Than Last Generation | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Because for all the talk of jogging, playing basketball on new knees and lacing up skates for late-night ice hockey games, it turns out baby boomers may be in worse shape than the generation that came before. That would be the one that, if urged by an ad to “just do it,” might have replied, “Just do what?”

Writing this month in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers offered a portrait of boomerdom at odds with its popular portrayal, and perhaps with its sense of itself. They found that boomers were more likely to be obese, more likely to have high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes -- and less likely to be physically active.

 

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

And if there is not a significant cultural change in nutrition and exercise habits the Gen X and Gen Y generation will be even worse.  Exercise and eat right! => save yourself.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

Hard-Wired to Hate Exercise?

Hard-Wired to Hate Exercise? | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Discipline and motivation aside, researchers are looking at the physiological reasons behind why some people enjoy exerting themselves and others don't.

When it comes to exercise, many people seem to fall into two distinct camps: those who love a vigorous, sweat-soaked workout and those who view it as a form of torment

With hopes of getting more people up and moving, scientists are looking at the body's biological and chemical processes for clues to understanding what's behind differing attitudes toward exercise. That could mean there are factors beyond motivation and discipline to explain why some people enjoy exercising and others don't.

more...
Eunice Chu's curator insight, March 26, 2013 4:44 PM

Interesting perspective. May be able to help me get over my laziness:)

Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

Studies on Older Endurance Athletes Suggest the Fittest Reap Few Health Benefits

Studies on Older Endurance Athletes Suggest the Fittest Reap Few Health Benefits | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

My comment:  Another vote for moderation.  Being sedentary is clearly NOT healthy.  But this data suggests that "Chronic extreme exercise appears to cause excessive ‘wear-and-tear’ on the heart,”.

==================================

A fast-emerging body of scientific evidence points to a conclusion that’s unsettling, to say the least, for a lot of older athletes: Running can take a toll on the heart that essentially eliminates the benefits of exercise. What the new research suggests is that the benefits of running may come to a hard stop later in life. In a study involving 52,600 people followed for three decades, the runners in the group had a 19% lower death rate than nonrunners, according to the Heart editorial. But among the running cohort, those who ran a lot—more than 20 to 25 miles a week—lost that mortality advantage.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

Diabetes Study Ends Early With a Surprising Result

Diabetes Study Ends Early With a Surprising Result | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Diet and weight loss did not prevent heart attacks and strokes in overweight and obese people with Type 2 diabetes.

A large federal study of whether diet and weight loss can prevent heart attacks and strokes in overweight and obese people with Type 2 diabetes has ended two years ahead of schedule because the intensive program did not help.  Many have assumed diet and exercise would help, in part because short-term studies had found that those strategies lowered blood sugar levels, blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Still, medical experts said there were many benefits to diet and exercise even if they did not reduce cardiovascular disease in people with diabetes.

About 25 million Americans have Type 2 diabetes. Many are overweight or obese. On average, the disease increases heart disease risk by 2 to 2 &frac12; times.  Study randomly assigned 5,145 overweight or obese people with Type 2 diabetes to either a rigorous diet and exercise regimen or to sessions in which they got general health information. The diet involved 1,200 to 1,500 calories a day for those weighing less than 250 pounds and 1,500 to 1,800 calories a day for those weighing more. The exercise program was at least 175 minutes a week of moderate exercise.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

Are You Likely to Respond to Exercise?

Are You Likely to Respond to Exercise? | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Research has confirmed that people's physiological responses to exercise vary wildly. Now a new genetic test promises to tell you whether you are likely to benefit aerobically from exercise.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD from Exercise for health
Scoop.it!

Walking Vs Treadmill Workouts

Walking Vs Treadmill Workouts | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Health, Heart, Lifestyle and More....

Via Rehabmyheart
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

Why running slow isn't bad

Why running slow isn't bad | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Boston Globe blogger counters arguments that runnng slow is useless and how this criticism and negative comments previously discouraged her from running at all,  Get Moving!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

Prognostic Value of Exercise Capacity

Prognostic Value of Exercise Capacity | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
To examine the prognostic value of exercise capacity in patients with nonrevascularized and revascularized coronary artery disease (CAD) seen in routine clinical practice.Conclusion

Exercise capacity was a strong predictor of mortality, MI, and downstream revascularizations in this cohort. Furthermore, patients with similar exercise capacities had an equivalent mortality risk, irrespective of baseline revascularization status.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

Authors from the FIT Project have put together beautifully the data and summarized it in this one image on the benefits of being fit or "in shape" and the benefits of having arteries "fixed" with angioplasty (PCI or stents) or bypass surgery (CABG), for patients who have coronary artery disease.

What the slide means:

The top row looks at mortality (death).  The term METS refers to the amount of energy spent and  roughly correlates with the number of minutes on the treadmill using the standard exercise protocol called the Bruce protocol.  Looking across the top row you can see that death rate falls as the amount of exercise increases.  The hazard of death falls by 75% for those who can exercise more than 12 minutes compared to those who exercise less than 6 minutes.

In the second & third rows the reduction of heart attacks (MIs) and need for future angioplasty or bypass surgery is effected by revascularization.  Patients that are "fixed" have lower rates of heart attack and needing to be fixed compared to those that haven't been fixed.

For coronary disease patients revascularization with stents or bypass and being fit based on exercise capacity provides the best prognosis

TAKE HOME MESSAGE - It's best to be ""fixed" and fit.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

Moscow Subway Ticket Machine Accepts 30 Squats As Payment

Moscow Subway Ticket Machine Accepts 30 Squats As Payment | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

To promote exercise and the 2014 Olympics, Olympic Changes installed a very special ticket machine at the Moscow subway station.  Instead of accepting money as payment, the high-tech ticket machine only accepted exercise. Riders could receive a free ticket by standing in front of the machine’s camera, and performing 30 squats or lunges. 

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

Here's a Russian idea that would have huge implications for bending the cost curve for health care in America

more...
Ekaterina's curator insight, December 2, 2013 4:48 AM

What a great idea! Perhaps other countries should join in!

Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

Researchers Compare Exercise, Drugs as Cardiovascular Treatments

Researchers Compare Exercise, Drugs as Cardiovascular Treatments | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Structured exercise programs may be as effective, or even more useful, than medication to treat cardiovascular conditions. The authors evaluated and synthesized the results of 305 previous studies to compare the benefits of drug and exercise regimens on disease outcomes.  

After identifying four conditions for which exercise has been studied as a preventive technique—coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure, and type-2 diabetes—Naci and Ioannidis compared the efficacy of drugs used to treat these conditions to previously-reported effects of exercise.

 They found that structured physical activity was more effective than drug use in the treatment and prevention of strokes, and equally effective in the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease and diabetes.  Diuretic drugs were more successful than exercise, however, in treating heart failure.

“[Our study] will trigger debate, which is really important,” said Naci. “In cases where we have evidence of exercise, exercise seems to do really well in comparison to drugs, but there are still a lot of instances where we don’t know how exercise fares against drugs.”

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

Unfortuaneely this eithetr or approach is not best.  For all patients who needs drugs for management of high blood pressure or cholesterol problems or diabetes the question is not drugs or exercsie but should be drugs and exercise.

more...
Dr. KGM BIYABANI's comment, November 3, 2013 4:00 AM
TREATMENT REGIMENS ARE TO BE INDIVIDUALIZED ACCORDING TO THE PATIENT'S DISEASE AND THE TREATMENT REGIMEN OUTCOMES. ACCORDING TO THE ABOVE STUDY THERE SHOULDN'T BE AN "OR".; TREATMENT REGIMENS MAY INCLUDE MANY PREVENTIVE AS WELL AS CURATIVE THERAPIES, BOTH PHARMACOLOGICAL AND NON-PHARMACOLOGICAL. AT THE END PATIENT/PERSON MATTERS. THERE SHOULD BE "AND" instead of "OR". OF COURSE THERE IS NEVER A MAGIC BULLET IN HEALTHCARE;THAT'S WHY THERE SHOULDN'T BE AN "OR" AS DR. BILAZARIAN HAS SAID. AND I AGREE WITH ROBIN THOMAS ABOUT "THE MAGIC BULLET" PART ONLY.
Dr. KGM BIYABANI's curator insight, November 3, 2013 4:04 AM

TREATMENT REGIMENS ARE TO BE INDIVIDUALIZED ACCORDING TO THE PATIENT'S DISEASE AND THE TREATMENT REGIMEN OUTCOMES. ACCORDING TO THE ABOVE STUDY THERE SHOULDN'T BE AN "OR".; TREATMENT REGIMENS MAY INCLUDE MANY PREVENTIVE AS WELL AS CURATIVE THERAPIES, BOTH PHARMACOLOGICAL AND NON-PHARMACOLOGICAL. AT THE END PATIENT/PERSON MATTERS. THERE SHOULD BE "AND" instead of "OR". OF COURSE THERE IS NEVER A MAGIC BULLET IN HEALTHCARE;THAT'S WHY THERE SHOULDN'T BE AN "OR" AS DR. BILAZARIAN HAS SAID. AND I AGREE WITH ROBIN THOMAS ABOUT "THE MAGIC BULLET" PART ONLY.

Randy Randhawa, DC's curator insight, November 5, 2013 3:45 PM

Daily motivation, "structured exercise programs may be as effective, or even more useful, than medication to treat cardiovascular conditions."

Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

The Rise of the Minimalist Workout

The Rise of the Minimalist Workout | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

People have been trying to figure out forever what the right amount of exercise is, but the focus lately is on the shortest period possible.

In the past, formal recommendations have called for a substantial amount of regular exercise. For example, published guidelines from the Health and Human Services Department in 2008 suggested 150 minutes of moderate exercise per week — the equivalent of five 30-minute walks. The guidelines added that 75 minutes of vigorous exercise a week, like jogging, could be substituted.

These guidelines were based on a large body of science showing that 150 minutes of moderate exercise was associated with a longer life span and a reduced risk of heart disease, diabetes and other illnesses.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

Studies have shown that 150 minutes of moderate exercise each week is associated with improved longevity and reduced risk of many diseases (obesity, diabetes).
Although these shorter more intense exercises are appealing for "busy" Americans, we don't know if the same long term health effects can be expected. In addition to the shorter time required in these workouts and therefore greater likelihood of adoption by those whop are motivated, another potential benefit is that the shorter duration of pain and discomfort with exercise may be an attractive aspect to help overcome the hurdles to exercise.

more...
Ellen Diane's comment, June 26, 2013 12:31 PM
I do intervals in my over 40 fitness class:) we do lots of cardio (cardiac:) bursts
Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

Dogs, Cats May Be Heart Healthy, AHA Says

Dogs, Cats May Be Heart Healthy, AHA Says | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

People who own dogs or cats may have a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease,.

 

Top Ten Things To Know Pet Ownership and Cardiovascular Risk
1. This AHA Scientific Statement critically assesses studies regarding the influence of pet ownership on the presence and reduction of CVD risk factors as a novel strategy in reducing the risk of CVD.
2. Pet ownership, particularly of dogs, is probably associated with decreased CVD risk (LOE B), and may have a causal role in reducing CVD risk (LOE B). Further investigation is needed to establish a causal relationship.
3. While pet ownership may be reasonable for the reduction in CVD risk (Class IIb, LOE B), pet adoption, rescue, or purchase should not be done for the primary purpose of reducing CVD risk (Class III, LOE C).
4. An association between pet ownership and lower blood pressure has been found in some, but not all, studies.
5. Of all pets, dogs seem most likely to positively influence physical activity, especially with owners who regularly walk their dogs.
6. Pets also play an important role in providing social support, which is one of the most significant predictors of adherence to behavior change over time.
7. Companion animals may strengthen engagement in a weight loss program.
8. A positive relationship between pet ownership and autonomic function or cardiovascular reactivity to stress has been reported in most published studies. People with pets tend to have lower baseline heart rates, lower blood pressures, and significantly reduced increases in heart rate and blood pressure in response to stress. Recovery time from a stressful event is also markedly improved.
9. Further investigation is warranted regarding the influence of pet ownership on reducing CVD risk, including those on risk factor modification, primary prevention, and use of pet acquisition as a part of a strategy for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.
10. Minimal data are available to make an association between hyperlipidemia and pet ownership, as well as survival in people without established cardiovascular disease and pet ownership.

 

COMPLETE INFO at

Levine GN, et al; on behalf of the American Heart Association Council on Clinical Cardiology and Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing. Pet ownership and cardiovascular risk: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2013:


http://circ.ahajournals.org/lookup/doi/10.1161/CIR.0b013e31829201e1

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

DISCLOSURE - I'm a dog lover.  I have given patient's prescriptions to get a dog and walk the dog twice daily.  I've also told patients to walk the dog every day whether they have a dog or not.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

The Psychology of Effective Workout Music

The Psychology of Effective Workout Music | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
New research clarifies why music and exercise make such a good team, and how to create an optimal workout playlist

Selecting the most effective workout music is not as simple as queuing up a series of fast, high-energy songs. One should also consider the memories, emotions and associations that different songs evoke. For some people, the extent to which they identify with the singer's emotional state and viewpoint determines how motivated they feel. And, in some cases, the rhythms of the underlying melody may not be as important as the cadence of the lyrics. In recent years some researchers and companies have experimented with new ways to motivate exercisers through their ears, such as a smartphone app that guides the listener's escape from zombies in a postapocalyptic world and a device that selects songs based on a runner's heart rate

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

Best line forom article:

The human brain may have evolved with the expectation that, wherever there is music, there is movement...Maybe the brain remembers it that way.

I personally think the distraction is a big contributor to the benefit listening provides to getting through a workout.  An audio-book serves this purpose and has no rhythm you can dance to.

 

.

more...
Simranjot S. Josan's curator insight, March 26, 2013 5:33 AM

After reading this article, I have thought about changing my workout music to more motivatoinal music such as rap or hip-hop when lifting and then house music or fast pased music when running. This could help push me when I am tired after a workout and I need to run. 

Rachel VanHorne's curator insight, April 11, 2013 1:00 AM

There are many times that I don't feel like working out on certain days because I have too much to get done before I go to bed or I'm just feeling drowsy and not in the mood. But I find that music often encourages me to keep exercising for at least over 30 minutes. Music distracts the mind from pain or fatigue, and elevates the mood to continue muscle exertion. This article dives into the reasons for why music makes us feel so good when working out and also suggests types of music to listen to in order to increase the amount of time spend working out and the force exerted as well. It suggests high energy songs, as well as songs that evoke memories, emotions, and associations with the song. For some people, when they can relate to the singer's lyrics and emotional state, it helps pump them up and increase workout efficiencies. When I work out, I usually just play any song with a pumping beat, and don't pay attention very much to its lyrics. But I often get tired of the same type of beat over and over. So now I will experiment with songs with lyrics that I can emotionally connect with, which may inspire me to workout faster and longer.In recent years some researchers and companies have experimented with new ways to motivate exercisers through their ears, such as a smartphone app that guides the listener's escape from zombies in a postapocalyptic world and a device that selects songs based on a runner's heart rate. Checking out these new devices and apps will encourage my workouts to be more fun to look forward to and efficient. This way, I won't procrastinate as much as I used to on working out and will find it as an entertaining escape from the rest of my events in my life.

Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

The Benefits of Exercising Outdoors

The Benefits of Exercising Outdoors | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

While the allure of the gym — climate-controlled, convenient and predictable — is obvious, especially in winter, emerging science suggests there are benefits to exercising outdoors that can’t be replicated on a treadmill, a recumbent bicycle or a track.

But the take-away seems to be that moving their routines outside could help reluctant or inconsistent exercisers. “If outdoor activity encourages more activity, then it is a good thing,” After all, “despite the fitness industry boom,”  “we are not seeing changes in national physical activity levels, so gyms are not the answer.”

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:
Studies suggest that exercising outdoors may offer advantages to working out at a gym because:

Outdoor exercise tends to be more strenuous than indoor exercise.

 

People tend to enjoy outdoor exercise more.

 

People tend to exercise harder when exercising outdoors.

more...
The BioSync Team's curator insight, March 2, 2013 2:08 AM

Recently finished a 6 week Qigong workshop outside - rain or shine - with a master from China!


Read More:   http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/21/the-benefits-of-exercising-outdoors/?ref=health

nancercize's comment, March 22, 2013 2:31 AM
And there are many studies supporting a connection between outdoors, nature, and reduced stress, improved concentration, and mood. More advantages!
Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

The Couch-to-5K ® Running Plan | C25K Mobile App

The Couch-to-5K ® Running Plan | C25K Mobile App | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Follow the Couch to 5K running plan or use our C25K mobile app to go from couch to your very first 5K. Follow this beginner training schedule and sign up for a 5K race.
Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

The couch to 5K strategy is a great program for those looking to become more fit and active. The online and web version guides for C25K are user friendly and I can endorse them personally having recently completed my first 5K.  If you're over 50 see your doctor first.

more...
Alacia Romack's curator insight, January 20, 2014 3:58 AM

This gives great structure for someone who hasn't ever trained for a 5K before. You can follow it as closely or as loosely as you'd like, but it gives a great start and something to work off of.

Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

How much exercise is enough?

How much exercise is enough? | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

My comment: Here's the answer to the question => What's the least I have to do? Answer: the more you do the better.  Fitness & Fatness independently important.

==========================

“We found that adding low amounts of physical activity to one’s daily routine, such as 75 minutes of brisk walking per week, was associated with increased longevity: a gain of 1.8 years of life expectancy after age 40, compared with doing no such activity"

We all know that exercise is good for you, but how good? While previous studies have shown the link between physical activity and a lower risk of premature mortality, the number of years of life expectancy gained among persons with different activity levels has been unclear — until now.

In a new study from Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute, researchers have quantified how many years of life are gained by being physically active at different levels, among all individuals as well as among various groups having different body mass indexes (BMI).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

5 Common workout mistakes

5 Common workout mistakes | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

For most people, unless you continually educate yourself on how to properly train for your goals, it can be hard to know if what you’re doing is correct or effective. Here are five common errors that a lot of people make in the gym and suggestions on how to rectify them:

1. Not having a plan

2. Limiting your tools

3. Sticking to the same routine:

4. Disregarding proper form:

5. Neglecting mobility and flexibility:

 

more...
delia thompson's curator insight, October 21, 2014 1:00 AM

Are you working out effectively?

Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

ACE Inhibitor as Indulgence Pill

ACE Inhibitor as Indulgence Pill | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

My comment:  Sounds like an attractive option.  Eat what you want but take a pill to avoid the consequences.  Unfortunately, this has already been tried in a large human study called NAVIGATOR. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1001121

Using the medicine Valsartan had a very small effect on reducing the progresion to diabetes (16%) and no effect on cardiovascular risk.  We still have to eat right and exercise. Sorry.

=====================================

A steady diet of hamburgers, fries, and Coke might not hurt the heart and the waistline as much with the ACE inhibitor captopril on board. 

Researchers at Emory University in Atlanta fed a high-fat diet with plenty of trans fat and high-fructose corn syrup to mice, with all the expected unhealthy effects on obesity, insulin resistance, and heart parameters.

But adding captopril to the drinking water along with the unhealthy diet reduced and even reversed weight gain, blocked abdominal fat gain, and improved glucose tolerance compared with controls. The drug also prevented the cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction that developed in the other mice.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

Weight Training Reduces Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Men

Weight Training Reduces Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Men | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Take Home Message: Physicians have recommended a MINIMUM of 150 minues of exercise weekly for diabetic risk reduction but the role resistance training or weight lifting is not certain.  In this study, weight training was associated with a significantly lower risk of Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM), independent of aerobic exercise. Combined weight training & aerobic exercise conferred a greater benefit.

+++++++++++++++++

Association of weight training with risk of T2DM in US men & to assess the influence of combining weight training and aerobic exercise, a prospective cohort study of 32 002 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study from 1990-2008. Weekly time spent on weight training & aerobic exercise (including brisk walking, jogging, running, bicycling, swimming, tennis, squash, and calisthenics/rowing) was obtained from questionnaires at baseline and biennially during follow-up. 

During 508 332 person-years of follow-up (18 years)

=> 2278 new cases of T2DM

=> dose-response relationship: increasing time spent on weight training or aerobic exercise and lower risk of T2DM (P < .001 for trend)

=> Engaging in weight training or aerobic exercise for at least 150 minutes per week was independently associated with a lower risk of T2DM of 34% (95% CI, 7%-54%) and 52% (95% CI, 45%-58%), respectively.

+> Men who engaged in aerobic exercise & weight training for at least 150 minutes per week had the greatest reduction in T2DM risk (59%; 95% CI, 39%-73%)

more...
No comment yet.