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Healthy Weight Loss

Healthy Weight Loss | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

A useful approach is to select the best diet that works for you. This
is the eating plan you can live with.
What You Need to Know About Weight Loss
A total of 3500 calories equals 1 pound of body weight. This means if you decrease (or increase) your intake by 500 calories daily, you will lose (or gain) 1 pound per week. (500 calories per day × 7 days = 3500 calories.)
All foods have carbohydrate, protein, and fat.

Carbohydrates provide 4 calories per gram.

Proteins provide 4 calories per gram.
Fats provide 9 calories per gram.
Carbohydrates are either simple or complex. Simple carbohydrates cause more  weight gain than complex carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates include sugar and starches (potatoes, pasta,and rice). Complex carbohydrates include fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

A 500 calorie reduction every day is a good basic rule to begin to have an understanding how to move weight down by about a pound per week - its a good start.  Slightly more advanced calculators are more accurate and can help understand how to move weight to a goal or ideal weight.  For those motivated to change habits on caloric intake these calculators can be very helpful.  See the Pennington Biomedial caculators at

 http://www.pbrc.edu/research-and-faculty/calculators/weight-loss-predictor/

 

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Tread Lightly: Labels That Translate Calories into Walking Distance Could Induce People to Eat Less

Tread Lightly: Labels That Translate Calories into Walking Distance Could Induce People to Eat Less | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Including the amount of physical activity needed to burn off the calories from a meal caused people to order on average 200 calories less in an online survey
Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

I usually here the opposite (converse?) of this from my patients.  Patients who use exercise equipment that estimate "calories burned" complain that after exercising for what they think is a reasonable or adequate time they have only burned 300 calories for example.  Since this is less than a candy bar. they get discouraged and often quit not recognizing the many other benefits of exercise on health.  The approach highlighted here helps people avoid the calorie consumption which has great benefit.

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Not all information is good: How To Make A Bacon Bowl

Not all information is good: How To Make A Bacon Bowl | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Over the years, the bacon craze has spread from breakfast to lunch, dinner, and eventually dessert. (Thanks for the bacon sundae, Burger King).

So, in an effort to make bacon an even more ubiquitous food, we created the "bacon bowl."

Bacon. Bowl.

Let the thought of a bowl made entirely of bacon sink in, then watch the video below to learn how you can make a bacon bowl for the upcoming Super Bowl. Or, you can just make a bacon bowl for yourself.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

Here is a piece of information that everyone can do without.  Not having a bowl made of pig bellies is a better way to enjoy the Duper Bowl and a great way to end up with a lower risk of heart attack and stroke.

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Rehabmyheart's comment, February 19, 2013 7:41 AM
unless you are a cardiologist or a cardiothoracic surgeon
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Does seeing a dish's calorie count make you eat healthier?

Does seeing a dish's calorie count make you eat healthier? | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

The moment of truth: The creamy pasta dish sounds delicious, but it's 500 calories more than the grilled chicken and vegetables. Do you order it?

In many cases the answer is yes, say researchers who have studied what happens when calorie counts are included on menus.

More diners will open their menus to find calorie counts under a proposed federal law requiring the counts in restaurants with 20 or more locations. Health advocates and restaurants say the law could be finalized by the end of the year. A Food and Drug Administration spokeswoman says details of the law, first proposed as part of the 2010 health care bill, are still being worked out. It could also require grocery and convenience stores to list calories on prepared foods.

Many restaurants are reworking recipes, swapping in whole milk for cream or putting less oil in cooking pans. Some are adding less sauce to dishes or offering smaller portions. Many are creating lower-calorie sections on menus or sticking to calorie guardrails, designing dishes to come in under 500 calories, A study funded by the City of New York that reviewed about 15,000 receipts and surveys from fast-food lunch patrons before and after the city required those restaurants to list calories on menus showed no change in the average calories bought. But 1 in 6 people used the calorie information, and that group purchased an average of 96 fewer calories, an 11% decrease.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

Having this data available will lead food manufacturers to develop and produce lighter options since customer awareness will eventually change behavior.

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How many calories are in that slice? The possibilities seem to be endless, according to the pizza lobby.

How many calories are in that slice? The possibilities seem to be endless, according to the pizza lobby. | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

A Pizza industry-funded coalition is hoping to keep calorie counts under the counter. Politico reports that “an old-fashioned political food fight” is under way in the Beltway with pizza makers arguing that a provision in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act requiring chain restaurants to provide calorie counts shouldn't apply to pizza.

According to the group—with the amiable name of the American Pizza Community—there are apparently 34 million ways to order a pizza, making advanced disclosure of an individual pizza's calorie count somewhat more difficult than the simpler burger-and-fries combo. The group is lobbying for a change in requirements that would instead mandate calorie counts for a slice rather than a whole pizza and average totals rather than specific calorie counts.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

Pizza is the most popular food in the world.  Consumers need to know what the nutritional facts are so they can make wise food choices.  I lack any sympathy for the claim that the topping combinations are too complex to accomplish this task. Sorry pizza makers - get in line.

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Supersize servings: good for your wallet, hazardous to your health?

Supersize servings: good for your wallet, hazardous to your health? | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
The Big Gulp is the new Public Enemy Number 1. The mayors of New York and Cambridge, the American Medical Association, and the Harvard School of Public Health have begun an assault on sugary drinks, particularly large servings of soda.

 

When we eat out of bigger containers or plates, we don’t notice that we’re eating more. That’s why, in one study, people ate more stale two-week-old popcorn when it was served in a big bucket compared to a small one.  In another study, they ate 73% more soup when the bowl was secretly refilled, without feeling any fuller.

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