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Familiarity breeds doctor contempt with EHRs - amednews.com

Familiarity breeds doctor contempt with EHRs - amednews.com | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Experts say meaningful use is contributing to the growth of electronic health record systems, but it also has a negative effect on EHR user-friendliness.
Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

The tide is definitely turning against EHR and the developers for these costly and poorly designed systems..  Doctors accepted the bumps and warts of poorly designed EHR systems initially but the cumbersomeness, absent interoperability, bugs & crashes and lack of "click-efficiency" to satisfy meaningful use requirements are getting louder and angier.

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Access to Doctors' Notes Aids Patients' Treatment

Access to Doctors' Notes Aids Patients' Treatment | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

My comment: Patients care improves when they can collaborate on the health record,  when the data is shared, reviewed and corrected.  

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Patients who have access to doctor's notes in their medical records are more likely to understand their health issues, recall what the doctor told them and take their medications as prescribed, according to a study published Monday.

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iPhone set the bar for smartphones in healthcare

iPhone set the bar for smartphones in healthcare | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Take Away Message:  The growth in apps for the iPhone that will help monitor and connect patients is growing astronomically. The iPhone's technology package: image quality and computing power,  has allowed this development.  Security remains a concern.

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Electonic Health Records Lose Money

Electonic Health Records Lose Money | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

The average physician lost nearly $44,000 over 5 years implementing an electronic health record system, a large pilot study found, but the technology itself was just part of the reason.

Just 27% of practices achieved a positive 5-year return on investment -- a number that would rise to 41% with the addition of federal incentives to use EHRs, the study in the March issue of Health Affairs stated.

Other results from the study include:

38% of practices with six or more physicians achieved a positive return on investment, compared with 26% of practices with one or two physicians55% of practices reported a reduction in the cost of paper medical records after EHR adoption22% of practices reported the most common ongoing cost was additional hours of practice time10% of practices noted improved efficiency, allowing them to see more patients each day18% increased revenue through improved billingPractices with a practice management system in place to help with billing functions before EHR adoption benefited less on average.
Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

In the 1950's Eisenhower cautioned about the Military Industrial Complex.  We now have an EMR Vendor -Medical Complex that has, through lobbying, resulted in transformation in delivery of healthcare that has enriched the software manufacturers despite poor quality products and no qulaity benfits on healthcare delivery. The lobbying has led to medical practices being compelled to use EHR and this has been a massive transfer of econonic resources from practices to technmology companies.

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Deborah Verran's comment, March 5, 2013 2:20 PM
This is really a case where organizations need to do their homework in advance and scope their needs prior to purchasing
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A Major Glitch for Digitized Health-Care Records

A Major Glitch for Digitized Health-Care Records | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

My comment: Electronic records (EMR or EHR) are supposed to deliver better health care quality and save billions of dollars.  It's not looking so good so far.  Evidence to the contrary is not welcome by the enthuisiasts and proponents of digitized records and some of these enthusiasts are the government and the payers who have created carrots and sticks to make sure this process continues.  Absent portability, interoperability and security are still with us for many years.

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