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Media, News & Topics on prevention, diagnosis & treatment of cardiovascular disease
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DASH: the Best Diet With the Least Buzz - US News

DASH: the Best Diet With the Least Buzz - US News | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

The aim is healthy blood pressure – the bonus is weight loss.

The name DASH, which stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, was coined in the 1997 New England Journal of Medicine study that started it all. Until then, dietary approaches had mainly focused on cutting salt and alcohol – and weight loss. 

Besides reducing blood pressure, other studies show DASH helps the heart by promoting healthier cholesterol and triglyceride levels. And the DASH approach is in line with American Diabetes Association guidelines. But there’s been one drawback: Few people follow it. A 2008 study  suggests less than one-fifth of Americans with high blood pressure adhere to DASH-style eating.

Because DASH isn’t a commercial diet, there’s no industry marketing behind it. And since it involves an overall dietary pattern, Appel says, “It’s hard to get somebody particularly engaged when it’s not patentable.” On the other hand, he adds, “If this was a pill, there’d be people making billions.”

 


Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

There are allot of diet options: Atkins, South Beach, Zone, Weight Watchers, Ornish, Mediterranean, Dash

Despite millions of dollars spent in the weight loss industry, available data are conflicting and insufficient to identify one diet as more beneficial than another.  The Pounds Lost Study (Sacks NEJM 2/26/2009) showed no significant differences in weight loss or satiety scores with several different options of high or low carbohydrate or fat components.

A recent systemic review of Head to Head RCTs concluded that on average they all show modest and similar long term weight loss.  (Attallah et al Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes 2014;7:815-27)


  Best advice  “have a diet you’ll stick with”.

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Where the Salt Lurks on Restaurant Menus

Where the Salt Lurks on Restaurant Menus | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

American adults eat in restaurants an average of five times a week—which means they probably eat way too much salt. Even fine-dining menus offer little escape from sodium overload.

Starting with the bread and salad and ending with the final plate of tiny cookies, many of restaurants' least salty-seeming options are significant sources of dietary salt.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

From WSJ: More Taste, Less Sodium

Chef Jeremy Bearman's Fresh Herb Tagliatelle with Maine Lobster has 690 milligrams of sodium—far less than the 1,600 milligrams or more found in a typical serving of traditional pasta and shrimp in tomato sauce.

About 60% of the sodium comes from the lobster itself. Colorful vegetables—leek, fennel, broccoli—provide sensory appeal and potassium to balance the lobster's saltiness.Housemade pasta is flavored with saffron but not salt, rolled with fresh herbs and cooked in unsalted water.Minimally salted pasta sauce begins with unsalted fennel stock. It contains leek purée made with saffron, lobster oil, lemon juice, Espellete pepper powder and a pinch of salt.Lobster oil is made by roasting lobster shells with tomato, white wine, chili flake, peppercorns, tarragon, carrot, celery and onion and then steeping them in olive oil.A squeeze of fresh lemon adds bright flavor.
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