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Healthy Weight Loss

Healthy Weight Loss | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

A useful approach is to select the best diet that works for you. This
is the eating plan you can live with.
What You Need to Know About Weight Loss
A total of 3500 calories equals 1 pound of body weight. This means if you decrease (or increase) your intake by 500 calories daily, you will lose (or gain) 1 pound per week. (500 calories per day × 7 days = 3500 calories.)
All foods have carbohydrate, protein, and fat.

Carbohydrates provide 4 calories per gram.

Proteins provide 4 calories per gram.
Fats provide 9 calories per gram.
Carbohydrates are either simple or complex. Simple carbohydrates cause more  weight gain than complex carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates include sugar and starches (potatoes, pasta,and rice). Complex carbohydrates include fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

A 500 calorie reduction every day is a good basic rule to begin to have an understanding how to move weight down by about a pound per week - its a good start.  Slightly more advanced calculators are more accurate and can help understand how to move weight to a goal or ideal weight.  For those motivated to change habits on caloric intake these calculators can be very helpful.  See the Pennington Biomedial caculators at

 http://www.pbrc.edu/research-and-faculty/calculators/weight-loss-predictor/

 

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Action-Related Television Content Increases Food Intake

Action-Related Television Content Increases Food Intake | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Television (TV) has generally been blamed for helping make Americans overweight owing to both its distracting influence and its encouragement of a sedentary lifestyle. Indeed, a recent correlational analysis of dinner patterns illustrated that the frequency of TV viewing during dinner was 1 of the 2 largest correlates of adult and child body mass index.

However, the focus to date has been on the medium and not the message. Granted, TV may lead distracted viewers to mindlessly eat past the point at which a person would usually stop. In this, it is not unlike other distracting activities that increase food intake, such as reading, listening to the radio, and interacting with dining companions. However, little is known about whether the content, valence, or pace of content influences how much a viewer eats while watching TV. For instance, how do objective technical characteristics, such as the frequency of visual camera cuts or the variation in sound, influence how much food is eaten?

More distracting TV content appears to increase food consumption: action and sound variation are bad for one’s diet. The more distracting a TV show, the less attention people appear to pay to eating, and the more they eat. Other potential causes, such as increased anxiety, agitation, and stimulation level, should be examined as contributing causes in future research.

While watching the programming, participants were given generous amounts of 4 snacks (M&Ms, cookies, carrots, and grapes) and allowed to eat as much as they wished. Food was weighed before and after the programs to determine the amount eaten by each viewer.

Subjects ate about twice as much watching the action movie compare to the talk show Charlie Rose.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

The paper does a good job highlighting the impact of distraction on overeating. There is a dose effect. The greater the distraction, the greater the over eating.

The talk show that was used in this trial was the Charlie Rose show. It was less distracting than an action movie and highlights the importance of knowing about distraction as a contributor to overeating.  For motivated patients, avoiding snacks when watching TV or having a limited quantity might reduce the hazard.  Alternatively you could limit your viewing to Charlie Rose.

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Tackling men's reluctance to join weight loss programmes

Tackling men's reluctance to join weight loss programmes | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Male obesity is increasing but few men take part in weight loss programs.  We assessed the effect of a weight loss and healthy living program on weight loss in football (soccer) fans.

 747 male football fans aged 35—65 years with a body-mass index (BMI) > 28 kg/m2 from 13 Scottish professional football clubs. Participants were randomly assigned, stratified by club, to a weight loss program delivered by community coaching staff in 12 sessions held every week. The intervention group started a weight loss program within 3 weeks, and the comparison group were put on a 12 month waiting list. All participants received a weight management booklet.

At 12 months the mean difference in weight loss between groups, adjusted for baseline weight and club, was 4·94 kg (10.9 lbs)  and percentage weight loss, was 4·36% (3·64—5·08), both in favor of the intervention. 

The FFIT programme can help a large proportion of men to lose a clinically important amount of weight; it offers one effective strategy to challenge male obesity.

 

Here's the link to the article on Lancet

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(13)62420-4/abstract

 

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

Weight loss achieved in this weekly education and accountability program was impressive and lasted 12 months.  Weight loss might be one of the educational opportunities best undertaken in a single sex environement

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Weigh More, Pay More on Samoa Air

Weigh More, Pay More on Samoa Air | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
A tiny South Pacific airline is charging passengers based on their weight, at a time when other carriers have only ventured to seek payment for luggage and meals.

Customers flying Samoan upstart carrier Samoa Air Ltd. on short international hops to neighboring American Samoa are set to pay US$0.92 per kilogram, or $0.42 a pound, for each flight.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

Hard to beleive that Americans could ever tolerate this.  Paying $20 more for being 50 pounds over weight or $40 for being 100 pounds overweight does not seem like much of an incentive but the "weigh in" at the airport counter might encourage weight loss for some.

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The Unexpected Dangers of Obesity

The Unexpected Dangers of Obesity | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Researchers are discovering more ways that obesity can damage the body. These include altering a person's ability to smell, disrupting sleep and sexual function, and accelerating cancerous tumor growth.

"Obesity is a complex condition," "Many, many things change in the body."

Fat produces numerous hormones, inflammatory molecules and other chemicals that can act directly on nearby organs or travel to wreak havoc in other areas of the body. Better understanding how this works might eventually open new avenues for treatment of obesity and linked conditions, experts say.

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Obesity May Hasten Cognitive Decline

Obesity May Hasten Cognitive Decline | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

People who are obese in middle age and who have high blood pressure and other so-called metabolic risk factors have a speedier cognitive decline as they get older than people of normal weight, according to a large study published Monday in the journal Neurology.

The study, involving 6,401 participants and spanning 10 years, adds to research indicating that obesity increases the risk of dementia later in life.

"In the last 10 years or so, people started suggesting you could be fit and fat—you could be obese and metabolically healthy and have no health risk," said Archana Singh-Manoux, lead author of the study and research director at Inserm, the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research.

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Wider Testing to Head Off Diabetes

Wider Testing to Head Off Diabetes | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Take Home Message:  Knowing your numbers including your blood sugar is valuable especially for overweight patients.  Unlike the person profiled in this article I find patients to be very responsive to this early warning sign and generally enthusiastic about efforts to reduce the risk of progresing to diabetes.

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Health-care providers are stepping up efforts to identify the millions of Americans believed to have prediabetes, a condition that can lead to full-blown diabetes, using the HgbA1cto check a greater number of hospital patients.  Prediabetes, typically defined as blood sugar that is higher than normal (over 100)  but not yet in the diabetes range (over 125).  NIH estimates that as many as 79 million Americans age 20 and older—or roughly one in three adults—have prediabetes. That figure dwarfs the 26 million Americans who have Type 2 diabetes, including seven million people believed to have the disease but don't know it.

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Can a Hospital Say, 'Only Thin Doctors Can Work Here'?

Can a Hospital Say, 'Only Thin Doctors Can Work Here'? | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Texas hospital refuses to hire overweight staff, including doctors and nurses. Is this ethical -- or sensible?

From the Vlog: I can think of a major problem, and that's treating healthcare risks equally. If you want to go after overweight, then who is going to sit in the hospital parking lot and see who is speeding when they come in? Who is going to make sure that someone arriving on a motorcycle or a bicycle is wearing a helmet? Who is going to make sure that they are wearing their seatbelts when they come to work? And to take this a bit further, in Texas, who is going to make sure that they are not riding horses at home because it is dangerous; or own a gun, which turns out to be a big health risk? There are a lot of other equally risky things besides weight that doctors or nurses or healthcare staff might do, and the question is, are we going to control that?

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High aerobic fitness in late adolescence is associated with reduced risk of heart attack

High aerobic fitness in late adolescence is associated with reduced risk of heart attack | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Aims Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and signs of atherosclerosis are present in all large arteries already in adolescence. We investigated the association between high physical fitness in late adolescence and myocardial infarction (MI) later in life.

Methods and results The study cohort comprised 743,498 Swedish men examined at the age of 18 years during conscription 1969–84. Aerobic fitness (Wmax) and muscle strength at conscription were measured. During follow-up period of 34 years, 11,526 MIs were registered in the cohort. After adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), diseases, education, blood pressure, and socio-economic factors, one standard deviation increase in the level of physical fitness was associated with an 18% decreased risk of later MI.  The beneficial effects of Wmax were significant across all recognized BMI groups, ranging from lean (BMI < 18.5) to obese (BMI > 30) (P < 0.05 for all). However, obese men (BMI > 30) in the highest fourth of Wmax had a higher risk of MI than did lean men (BMI < 18.5) in the highest (HR 4.6, 95% CI 1.9–11.2), and lowest (HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2–2.6) fourth of Wmax.

Conclusions We report a significant graded association between aerobic fitness in late adolescence and MI later in life in men. However, obese men with a high aerobic fitness had a higher risk of MI than lean men with a low aerobic fitness.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

The impact of overweight status and fitness status (both aerobic and strength) in 18 yo men,  predicted heart attack over the next 3 decades.  Although both are important, as can be seen in the graphic, the impact of overweight status (fatness) was of greater risk than being "unfit".  Fatness worse than unfitness.

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Jenny Han's curator insight, December 13, 2014 5:55 AM

Graph shows what we should learn.

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Global Girth Grows to 2.1 billion

Global Girth Grows to 2.1 billion | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
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Fat Chance or Fat Choice? | Review of Fat Chance: The bitter truth about sugar

Fat Chance or Fat Choice? | Review of Fat Chance: The bitter truth about sugar | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

We see many examples of people who have never really engaged with behaviour change and many who have tried hard but failed to achieve any meaningful outcome. So, how do we encourage real, life-changing and long-lasting behaviour change in our patients? When faced with many disappointments, can it even work?

Lustig spends most of the first half of the book explaining why behaviour change alone is so difficult. Our bodies have multiple adaptations to protect our body weight and we do not relinquish it without a fight. This battle is waged day by day in our guts (gut hormones) and our brains (leptin) making sustained weight loss incredibly difficult. Lustig clearly believes that individual behaviour change, while important, is inadequate to fully tackle the global obesity epidemic. Orchestrating this disaster, according to Lustig, is a food environment which has changed dramatically over the last 50 years in the Western World, in parallel to the rise in obesity, and Lustig argues that tackling this aspect of our culture should be a greater concern.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

My patients' food environments are the biggest impediment to successful lifestyle modification adn weitght loss.

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Steve Kingsley's curator insight, October 1, 2013 8:41 PM

Yes, it's much more than changing one's diet - it really is about changing one's life style.

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How to Help an Overweight Partner Lose Weight

How to Help an Overweight Partner Lose Weight | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Few subjects in a relationship are more difficult to talk about than one person's weight. Even people who aren't overweight can obsess about their appearance (sadly, these mostly tend to be women). How can a partner raise the issue with someone who is overweight without causing hurt or embarrassment? And how can an overweight person address his or her weight problem without obsessing and harming the relationship?

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Things you should never say to someone trying to lose weight

Things you should never say to someone trying to lose weight | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

I'm doing this the old-fashioned way by eating healthy and exercising. Plain and simple. I know these comments come from a place of love -- the people I've heard these from mean well. It just comes out wrong and winds up bugging me. So without further ado, here are the things I "nevah evah nevah" want to hear again about my loss of 45+ pounds:

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Obesity data by state - Orange is bad!

Obesity data by state - Orange is bad! | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Obesity prevalence in 2011 varies across states and regions
By state, obesity prevalence ranged from 20.7% in Colorado to 34.9% in Mississippi in 2011. No state had a prevalence of obesity less than 20%. 39 states had a prevalence of 25% or more; 12 of these states had a prevalence of 30% or more: Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas, and West Virginia.
The South had the highest prevalence of obesity (29.5%), followed by the Midwest (29.0%), the Northeast (25.3%) and the West (24.3%).

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What Really Makes Us Fat

What Really Makes Us Fat | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Take Home:  Another review on the comparison of diets.  This is a good read.

Key sentence "the nutrient composition of the diet can trigger the predisposition to get fat, independent of the calories consumed"

Of the 3 diets tested: Low Fat/High Carbohydrate, High Fat/Low Carbohydrate "Atkins",  the best is the Low Glycemic Index for weight loss and long term maintenance and health .  To achieve this many of my patients have implemented Belly Fat Cure by Jorge Cruise.

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