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Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
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Triglycerides on the rise: should we swap seats on the seesaw?

Triglycerides on the rise: should we swap seats on the seesaw? | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

For decades, cardiovascular risk attributed to lipids beyond LDL has focused on HDL.  Observational data show a consistent inverse relationship between HDL & cardiovascular risk. However, multiple strategies to raise HDL levels have thus far failed to forestall events in clinical trials [e.g. currently available fibrates, niacin, &  cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors. 

Apolipoprotein C3 regulates triglyceride-rich lipoprotein can promote inflammation and the preponderance of current genetic evidence sways the seesaw surely to the triglyceride side.

Recent genetic studies show that a lifetime of lower exposure to APOC3 reduced cardiovascular risk. 

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

From author Peter Libby:

In the meantime, what should clinicians do to manage patients who present with hypertriglyceridemia? These new data regarding a causal role for triglycerides in increasing cardiovascular risk should prompt us today to redouble our efforts to reduce hypertriglyceridemia in our patients using non-pharmacological approaches. We should examine the medication list for agents that might raise triglyceride levels such as estrogens and retinoic acid products.  We should consider whether alcohol consumption or thyroid disease contributes to dyslipidemia in individual patients. We should strive to achieve optimum control in diabetic patients. We can discourage excessive carbohydrate consumption in those with hypertriglyceridemia.

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Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
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Lower Your Triglycerides with Lifestyle

Triglycerides (TGs) are a type of fat in the bloodstream. They are used for energy. When TGs become too high, this biomarker
suggests risk for cardiovascular disease, especially when accompanied by low HDL-cholesterol and high LDL-cholesterol. High
triglycerides are a common problem in the United States. One third of adults have levels above the normal range (< 150 mg/dl).
The good news about TGs is that they are highly responsive to lifestyle modifications. Optimal lifestyle interventions can lower
TGs by 20-50%. We suggest that you look at the following chart and select a change or changes you feel ready to make!
Note: When evaluating TG levels over time, be aware that there is considerable variability in the measurement of TG. Look at
the trend in TG over time (not just one reading) to evaluate the success of your lifestyle changes. Remember, the same positive
lifestyle changes that lower TG, also improve your overall health!

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

Nice resource from National Lipid Association on therapeutic lifestyle changes that reduce triglycerides.  PDF tear sheet.

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