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Media, News & Topics on prevention, diagnosis & treatment of cardiovascular disease
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F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America’s Future 2013

F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America’s Future 2013 | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

After three decades of increases, adult obesity rates remained level in every state except for one, Arkansas, in the past year, according to F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America's Future 2013, a report from the Trust for America's Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). The full report is available here. Visit http://www.FasinFat.org/ for interactives, graphs, charts and obesity rates for the states and nation going back decades.

Thirteen states now have adult obesity rates above 30 percent, 41 states have rates of at least 25 percent, and every state is above 20 percent, according to the report. In 1980, no state was above 15 percent; in 1991, no state was above 20 percent; in 2000, no state was above 25 percent; in 2007, only Mississippi was above 30 percent.*

Since 2005, there has been some evidence that the rate of increase has been slowing. In 2005, every state but one experienced an increase in obesity rates; in 2008, rates increased in 37 states; in 2010, rates increased in 28 states; and in 2011, rates increased in 16 states.*

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Austin Newby's curator insight, December 10, 2015 3:57 PM

1. Through the use of many statistics the author has made their case effective.

2. This article was about the weights in some states and how high the obesity rates are, and how the rates remained level in mostly every state the past year.

3. The article definitely was not the most interesting one I have read, but was very informative.

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Candy at the Cash Register — Obesity & Chronic Disease Risk Factor

Candy at the Cash Register — Obesity & Chronic Disease Risk Factor | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

A basic misconception has stymied our response to the obesity epidemic: the belief that food-related decisions are consciously and deliberately made. Our reluctance to interfere with or regulate the food environment is a direct consequence of the belief that people's food choices reflect their true desires. However, given the large proportion of people who claim that they want to lose weight and the small proportion who are actually able to do so, we must concede that human behavior doesn't always conform with professed goals. The reality is that food choices are often automatic and made without full conscious awareness. Placement of foods in prominent locations increases the rate at which they're purchased; purchase leads to consumption; and consumption of foods high in sugar, fat, and salt increases the risks of chronic diseases.  Although placement is a factor that is right in front of our noses, we should consider treating it as a hidden risk factor, like carcinogens in water, because placement influences our food choices in a way that is largely automatic and out of our conscious control and that subsequently affects our risk of diet-related chronic diseases.

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BCHS- Alyssa Snyder's curator insight, February 26, 2013 4:04 PM

Many people believe it is their choice conciously of what they will buy and eat that night for their dinner. Sometimes it isnt, it could possibly be a subconcious decision made when we go to a store and look at the candy surrounding a cash register. Due to the placing of the sweet and sugar-rich foods, we are chosing them more than the nutrisous foods past generations would chose. Many things effect our eating ehaviour though, such as commercials, placings of food, whic many people would not think of as a major thing for chosing food, and also what our parents usually buy. We can prevent this by avoiding those aisles that have suh=gary foods or foods that are attractive to us located in them.

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Sleep tips: How to get more rest

Sleep tips: How to get more rest | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Running a sleep deficit, it turns out, can have very real consequences for the balance sheet of life. For instance, research shows that sleeping too little can cause hormones such as leptin and ghrelin to go haywire. They’re prime actors in appetite regulation, and when we fail to get enough rest, cravings for calorie-laden food can be inflamed, sparking weight gain. Follow these simple recommendations. 

 

Or see our video => Good Sleep:Ten Tips

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7Vt5lhNmpo 

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Companies Slip Workouts Into Work

Companies Slip Workouts Into Work | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Projects like indoor walking tracks & attractive stairwells, installation of treadmill work stations are becoming more common in company's wellness programs. "You have to make these opportunities very, very easy and accessible, Not everyone wants to take a boot-camp class."

Companies have long sought to engage employees in wellness activities, partly in hopes of putting the brakes on skyrocketing health-insurance costs. While corporate gyms are helpful, research shows that only about a quarter of workers join them. So companies are targeting a broader group of workers, thinking up clever ways to get people moving without cutting into busy workdays or donning a stitch of Spandex.

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Coffee May Be Linked to Longer Life, But…

Coffee May Be Linked to Longer Life, But… | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Coffee drinkers are getting a bit more reassurance that their beverage of choice may not be bad for them, and might even be linked to living longer.

The upshot was that the more coffee people drank, the less risk they had of dying within the study’s time span. Men who drank six or more cups of coffee a day had a 10% lower risk than those who drank none, while for women it was 15% lower. The trend was consistent for deaths from a number of major causes such as heart disease, diabetes, stroke and even injuries and accidents. (The authors noted that the association “could reflect chance.”) One major exception was cancer, where coffee drinkers saw no advantage.
The findings weren’t affected by whether the coffee was caffeinated or not, but it’s unclear what, if anything, in the drink might have a positive health impact 

Indeed, the study has lots of limits. One is the risk that the effect of other things that change health, like smoking, may not have been completely filtered out. When all of these other influences were left in, coffee drinkers actually tended to have a higher risk of dying than those who abstained. 

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The Rise of the Minimalist Workout

The Rise of the Minimalist Workout | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

People have been trying to figure out forever what the right amount of exercise is, but the focus lately is on the shortest period possible.

In the past, formal recommendations have called for a substantial amount of regular exercise. For example, published guidelines from the Health and Human Services Department in 2008 suggested 150 minutes of moderate exercise per week — the equivalent of five 30-minute walks. The guidelines added that 75 minutes of vigorous exercise a week, like jogging, could be substituted.

These guidelines were based on a large body of science showing that 150 minutes of moderate exercise was associated with a longer life span and a reduced risk of heart disease, diabetes and other illnesses.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

Studies have shown that 150 minutes of moderate exercise each week is associated with improved longevity and reduced risk of many diseases (obesity, diabetes).
Although these shorter more intense exercises are appealing for "busy" Americans, we don't know if the same long term health effects can be expected. In addition to the shorter time required in these workouts and therefore greater likelihood of adoption by those whop are motivated, another potential benefit is that the shorter duration of pain and discomfort with exercise may be an attractive aspect to help overcome the hurdles to exercise.

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Ellen Diane's comment, June 26, 2013 7:31 AM
I do intervals in my over 40 fitness class:) we do lots of cardio (cardiac:) bursts
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Are You Likely to Respond to Exercise?

Are You Likely to Respond to Exercise? | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Research has confirmed that people's physiological responses to exercise vary wildly. Now a new genetic test promises to tell you whether you are likely to benefit aerobically from exercise.
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Sitting for More than 3 Hours a Day Cuts Life Span

Sitting for More than 3 Hours a Day Cuts Life Span | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Sitting down for more than three hours a day can shave a person's life expectancy by two years, even if he or she is physically active and refrains from dangerous habits like smoking, according to a study to be published in the online journal BMJ Open.

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Stress has less effect on high-ranking baboons—and British civil servants

Stress has less effect on high-ranking baboons—and British civil servants | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Take Home message:  Patients ask me every day about stress and health.  The amount of stress is not correlated to health outcomes; the response to stress is what matters.  From a very practical standpoint stress can lead to unhealthy behaviors: smoking, alcohol, eating, disrupted sleep. Controlling stress may be the key.  The alpha male in the baboon troop can control stress by choosing when to fight. Humans can control this by intentionally taking a break: day off, vacation, meditation, recreational diversions like walking or hobbies.  It matters.

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Healthy Food Is a Better Deal Than Junk, USDA Says

Healthy Food Is a Better Deal Than Junk, USDA Says | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Healthy food isn't necessarily more expensive than junk food, according to a new government report.

 

The finding contradicts long-held conventional wisdom that it’s cheaper to snack on potato chips than carrots, and bolsters the Obama administration’s fight against rising obesity levels in the U.S.

Food economists traditionally measure the amount of calories you get for your money. By that measure, you still get more when you buy pizza, French fries or other foods high in sodium, salt and saturated fat.

But the USDA study looked at a food’s worth from new perspective and concluded there’s better value in fruits, vegetables, lean meat and low-fat milk. You may get fewer calories per dollar, researchers say, but you get more food when you’re measuring based on price per weight, or price per portion.  By the food-portion metric, romaine lettuce is much cheaper than ice cream sandwiches and 1% milk is cheaper than soda.

 

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