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Media, News & Topics on prevention, diagnosis & treatment of cardiovascular disease
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F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America’s Future 2013

F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America’s Future 2013 | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

After three decades of increases, adult obesity rates remained level in every state except for one, Arkansas, in the past year, according to F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America's Future 2013, a report from the Trust for America's Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). The full report is available here. Visit http://www.FasinFat.org/ for interactives, graphs, charts and obesity rates for the states and nation going back decades.

Thirteen states now have adult obesity rates above 30 percent, 41 states have rates of at least 25 percent, and every state is above 20 percent, according to the report. In 1980, no state was above 15 percent; in 1991, no state was above 20 percent; in 2000, no state was above 25 percent; in 2007, only Mississippi was above 30 percent.*

Since 2005, there has been some evidence that the rate of increase has been slowing. In 2005, every state but one experienced an increase in obesity rates; in 2008, rates increased in 37 states; in 2010, rates increased in 28 states; and in 2011, rates increased in 16 states.*

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Fat Chance or Fat Choice? | Review of Fat Chance: The bitter truth about sugar

Fat Chance or Fat Choice? | Review of Fat Chance: The bitter truth about sugar | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

We see many examples of people who have never really engaged with behaviour change and many who have tried hard but failed to achieve any meaningful outcome. So, how do we encourage real, life-changing and long-lasting behaviour change in our patients? When faced with many disappointments, can it even work?

Lustig spends most of the first half of the book explaining why behaviour change alone is so difficult. Our bodies have multiple adaptations to protect our body weight and we do not relinquish it without a fight. This battle is waged day by day in our guts (gut hormones) and our brains (leptin) making sustained weight loss incredibly difficult. Lustig clearly believes that individual behaviour change, while important, is inadequate to fully tackle the global obesity epidemic. Orchestrating this disaster, according to Lustig, is a food environment which has changed dramatically over the last 50 years in the Western World, in parallel to the rise in obesity, and Lustig argues that tackling this aspect of our culture should be a greater concern.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

My patients' food environments are the biggest impediment to successful lifestyle modification adn weitght loss.

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Steve Kingsley's curator insight, October 1, 2013 8:41 PM

Yes, it's much more than changing one's diet - it really is about changing one's life style.

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The Unexpected Dangers of Obesity

The Unexpected Dangers of Obesity | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Researchers are discovering more ways that obesity can damage the body. These include altering a person's ability to smell, disrupting sleep and sexual function, and accelerating cancerous tumor growth.

"Obesity is a complex condition," "Many, many things change in the body."

Fat produces numerous hormones, inflammatory molecules and other chemicals that can act directly on nearby organs or travel to wreak havoc in other areas of the body. Better understanding how this works might eventually open new avenues for treatment of obesity and linked conditions, experts say.

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Fat Sick and Nearly Dead | a Joe Cross Film

Fat Sick and Nearly Dead | a Joe Cross Film | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

An Australian's cross country tour of American obesity, diet and its health implications.  Joe Cross fasts from processed food and consumes juices only for 60 days, to counter obesity and chronic urticaria.  He interviews Americans of all stripes across the nation.  They acknowledge the impact they are currently experiencing from obesity and understand the role diet plays but uniformly say that there is no way they will or can change ("I like Spam").  The argument that we need to change from 5% plant based diet to 100%  will inform the viewer and hopefully make an impact.  Check out the trailer.  Available on Netflix.

 

For the cynics who watch the film and wonder if the featured character Phil Staples maintained the weight loss after the film, here's the 3 year post production follow-up:

http://culturemob.com/what-happened-to-fan-favorite-phil-staples-after-the-film-fat-sick-and-nearly-dead

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Frequently Asked Questions About "Better" Fats from AHA

Frequently Asked Questions About "Better" Fats from AHA | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
What are the "better" fats and which foods contain them?

The unsaturated fats (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated) are also found in many foods.  Vegetable oils, nuts, and seafood are recommended sources of these fats.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

Great resource on FAQs about, un-, mono-, poyun- and saturated fat Dscussion about omega -3 and 6 fatty acids and fish oil is very clear and understandable..  The words "eat fish" appear often. 

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Single junk meal causes immediate decline in cardiovascular function

Single junk meal causes immediate decline in cardiovascular function | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Many people allow themselves a “cheat meal” or unhealthy meal as a reward for reaching fitness or health goals.

Via Rehabmyheart
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Can a Hospital Say, 'Only Thin Doctors Can Work Here'?

Can a Hospital Say, 'Only Thin Doctors Can Work Here'? | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Texas hospital refuses to hire overweight staff, including doctors and nurses. Is this ethical -- or sensible?

From the Vlog: I can think of a major problem, and that's treating healthcare risks equally. If you want to go after overweight, then who is going to sit in the hospital parking lot and see who is speeding when they come in? Who is going to make sure that someone arriving on a motorcycle or a bicycle is wearing a helmet? Who is going to make sure that they are wearing their seatbelts when they come to work? And to take this a bit further, in Texas, who is going to make sure that they are not riding horses at home because it is dangerous; or own a gun, which turns out to be a big health risk? There are a lot of other equally risky things besides weight that doctors or nurses or healthcare staff might do, and the question is, are we going to control that?

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