Heart and Vascular Health
33.6K views | +0 today
Follow
Heart and Vascular Health
Media, News & Topics on prevention, diagnosis & treatment of cardiovascular disease
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance

Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) are among the most widely used food additives worldwide, regularly consumed by lean and obese individuals alike. NAS consumption is considered safe and beneficial owing to their low caloric content, yet supporting scientific data remain sparse and controversial. Here we demonstrate that consumption of commonly used NAS formulations drives the development of glucose intolerance through induction of compositional and functional alterations to the intestinal microbiota. These NAS-mediated deleterious metabolic effects are abrogated by antibiotic treatment, and are fully transferrable to germ-free mice upon faecal transplantation of microbiota configurations from NAS-consuming mice, or of microbiota anaerobically incubated in the presence of NAS. We identify NAS-altered microbial metabolic pathways that are linked to host susceptibility to metabolic disease, and demonstrate similar NAS-induced dysbiosis and glucose intolerance in healthy human subjects. Collectively, our results link NAS consumption, dysbiosis and metabolic abnormalities, thereby calling for a reassessment of massive NAS usage.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

We have been using non-caloric artificial sweeteners for more than a century. Today the food industry is using them in ever-greater quantities in 'diet' foodstuffs and they are recommended for weight loss and for individuals with glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This report shows that consumption of the three most commonly used non-caloric artificial sweeteners — saccharin, sucralose and aspartame (Sweet-n-Low, Equal & Splenda)— directly induces a propensity for obesity and glucose intolerance in mice, by changing the gut microbiome in a way that leads to absorption of more calories and that compromises glucose tolerance.  In healthy human subjects, and suggest it may be necessary to develop new nutritional strategies tailored to the individual and to variations in the gut microbiota.

more...
Donovan Baldwin's curator insight, December 29, 2014 9:18 AM

A life without sweeteners of any kind is not actually that bad. However, if you must have sweetness, it appears that artificial sweeteners are still better than sugar. Try the 21 Day Sugar Detox. Learn more at http://nodiet4me.com/review/sugar_detox.html

Scooped by Seth Bilazarian, MD
Scoop.it!

Artificial Sweeteners - (Nonnutritive): Current Use & Health Perspectives from AHA & ADA

Artificial Sweeteners - (Nonnutritive): Current Use & Health Perspectives from AHA & ADA | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Using non-nutritive sweeteners could cut down on added sugars and so have beneficial effects, but there are caveats.

 

Beneficial effects could be undone if people "compensate" for the calorie cuts by eating more high-calorie foods – drinking a diet soda, for example, then having an extra piece of cake later.

 

A high intake of dietary sugars has been shown to contribute to cardiovascular disease and obesity, which can lead to the development of diabetes. The researchers looked at studies of the non-nutritive sweeteners aspartame, acesulfame-K, neotame, saccharin, sucralose, and stevia.

 

At this time, there are insufficient data to determine conclusively
whether the use of NNS to displace caloric sweeteners
in beverages & foods reduces added sugars or carbohydrate
intakes, or benefits appetite, energy balance, body weight, or
cardiometabolic risk factors.

more...
No comment yet.