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DASH: the Best Diet With the Least Buzz - US News

DASH: the Best Diet With the Least Buzz - US News | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

The aim is healthy blood pressure – the bonus is weight loss.

The name DASH, which stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, was coined in the 1997 New England Journal of Medicine study that started it all. Until then, dietary approaches had mainly focused on cutting salt and alcohol – and weight loss. 

Besides reducing blood pressure, other studies show DASH helps the heart by promoting healthier cholesterol and triglyceride levels. And the DASH approach is in line with American Diabetes Association guidelines. But there’s been one drawback: Few people follow it. A 2008 study  suggests less than one-fifth of Americans with high blood pressure adhere to DASH-style eating.

Because DASH isn’t a commercial diet, there’s no industry marketing behind it. And since it involves an overall dietary pattern, Appel says, “It’s hard to get somebody particularly engaged when it’s not patentable.” On the other hand, he adds, “If this was a pill, there’d be people making billions.”

 


Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

There are allot of diet options: Atkins, South Beach, Zone, Weight Watchers, Ornish, Mediterranean, Dash

Despite millions of dollars spent in the weight loss industry, available data are conflicting and insufficient to identify one diet as more beneficial than another.  The Pounds Lost Study (Sacks NEJM 2/26/2009) showed no significant differences in weight loss or satiety scores with several different options of high or low carbohydrate or fat components.

A recent systemic review of Head to Head RCTs concluded that on average they all show modest and similar long term weight loss.  (Attallah et al Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes 2014;7:815-27)


  Best advice  “have a diet you’ll stick with”.

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Don't Let Salt sneak Up on You from AHA

Don't Let Salt sneak Up on You from AHA | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

The American Heart Association wants you to end your love affair with salt! Learn the facts about sodium and take the pledge to live a heart healthy life.

Thinking about ending your love affair with salt? You’ve come to the right place! We’ll show you how extra salt sneaks into your diet and how it hurts your health, and share tips for kissing the excess salt goodbye and starting a healthier relationship with food. And be sure to keep checking our blog, the Salty Scoop, to learn more..

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

Check put Sodium 411 and take the sodium quiz at heart.org/sodium to be sure your basic knowledge about dietary sodium is adequate for life long cardiovascular health

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Low-Risk Diet & Lifestyle Habits in the Prevention of Myocardial Infarction

Low-Risk Diet & Lifestyle Habits in the Prevention of Myocardial Infarction | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Background  Adherence to a combination of healthy dietary and lifestyle practices may have an impressive impact on the primary prevention of myocardial infarction (MI).

Methods  The population of Swedish men comprised 45- to 79-year-old men who completed a detailed questionnaire on diet and lifestyle at baseline in 1997. In total, 20,721 men with no history of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, or high cholesterol levels were followed through 2009. Low-risk behavior included 5 factors:

1.  healthy diet (top quintile of Recommended Food Score)

2.  moderate alcohol consumption (10 to 30 g/day)

3.  no smoking

4.  being physically active (walking/bicycling ≥40 min/day and exercising ≥1 h/week)

5.  no abdominal adiposity (waist circumference < 37 inches).

Results  During 11 years of follow-up, we ascertained 1,361 incident cases of MI. The low-risk dietary choice together with moderate alcohol consumption was associated with a relative risk of 0.65 compared with men having 0 of 5 low-risk factors. Men having all 5 low-risk factors compared with those with 0 low-risk factors had a relative risk of 0.14. This combination of healthy behaviors, present in 1% of the men, could prevent 79% (95% CI: 34% to 93%) of the MI events on the basis of the study population.

Conclusions  Almost 4 of 5 MIs in men may be preventable with a combined low-risk behavior.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

The greater the combination of heathy behaviors the greater the benefit in risk reduction for heart attack.  Choosing just two (diet and moderate alcohol) reduces the risk of heart attack by 35%.  Subscribing to all 5 has an impressive 80% reduction in heart attack.

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Wine only protects against CVD in people who exercise

Wine only protects against CVD in people who exercise | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Wine only protects against cardiovascular disease (CVD) in people who exercise, according to results from the In Vino Veritas (IVV) study presented at ESC Congress 2014.

IVV is the first long-term, prospective randomised trial comparing the effect of red and white wine on markers of atherosclerosis. The study included 146 people with mild to moderate risk of cardiovascular disease. Participants were randomised to one year of moderate consumption of red (Pinot Noir) or white wine (Chardonnay-Pinot) from the same year and wine region of the Czech Republic.

Moderate consumption was the World Health Organization definition of 0.2 L for women and 0.3 L for men, a maximum of five times a week. The primary endpoint was the level of HDL cholesterol at one year. Participants consumed their usual diet.

The researchers found that there was no difference between HDL cholesterol levels at the beginning of the study compared to one year in either the red or white wine groups. LDL cholesterol was lower in both groups at one year while total cholesterol was lower only in the red wine group.: "The only positive and continuous result was in the subgroup of patients who took more exercise, which means regular exercise at least twice a week, plus the wine consumption. In this group HDL cholesterol increased and LDL and total cholesterol decreased in the

red and white wine groups. There may be some synergy between the low dose of ethyl alcohol in wine and exercise which is protective against CVD."

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

American patients often seize the results of population based dietary studies and often take them out of context.  French populations drink more red wine and have lower rates of cardiovascular events so Americans may add wine to their diet without considering the many other potential contributors to the good outcome.  The French ,in addition to consuming more red wine. also exercise more, eat less processed foods, have lower rates of obesity and eat less fast foods and snack less.  False conclusions are often made also made about fish eating populations such as Eskimos.

The IVV study brings to light these other important added contributors to health.

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Donovan Baldwin's curator insight, September 1, 2014 11:43 AM

Interesting article. I have always said that most of these things, supplements, red wine, massage, weight loss products, diet pills, whatever...would probably only have a significant effect if they were a part of a healthy lifestyle, which includes exercise, nutrition, and rest.

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Study finds Americans are beginning to consume fewer calories and eat at home more often.

Study finds Americans are beginning to consume fewer calories and eat at home more often. | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Americans are beginning to consume fewer calories and eat at home more often, according to a government study that suggests the nation's diet is taking a slightly healthier turn.

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Heart Healthy Holiday Party Survival Guide

Heart Healthy Holiday Party Survival Guide | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Attending a holiday party doesn’t mean your heart healthy decisions should take a back seat. In fact, this is where they matter most. Holiday parties are prime for tasty, caloric snacks and sugary cocktails, which can be detrimental to heart health, and waistline. But it doesn’t have to be. Keep these five tips in mind the next time you’re invited to a soiree.

1. Put it on a plate 

2. Find a mix

3. Share

4. Stay hydrated

5. Pace yourself

 

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Harvard study provides best evidence yet that nuts may reduce risk of death

Harvard study provides best evidence yet that nuts may reduce risk of death | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

New research provides strongest evidence to date that eating nuts can reduce a person’s risk of dying from cancer, heart disease, and a number of other causes.  The study, published Wednesday in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine, involved more than 118,000 healthy volunteers and found that those who regularly consumed a one-ounce daily serving of walnuts, almonds, cashews, or other tree nuts had a 20% lower risk of dying from any cause during the three-decade long study compared to those who did not eat nuts. Nut eaters were 25 percent less likely to die from heart disease, 10 percent less likely to die from cancer, and 20 percent less likely to die from diabetes as well as lung diseases. The study found that nut eaters enjoyed longer lifespans even if they did not exercise, avoided fruits and vegetables, and were overweight. A decade ago, the Food and Drug Administration determined that there was enough evidence to announce to Americans that eating 1&frac12; ounces of nuts each day “may reduce the risk of heart disease.”

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

When thinking about adding nuts to your diet its hard not to think about the adage that, "you are what you eat".  But eating nuts is definitely not only not "nuts" but quite nutritionally sensible.  Tree nuts are nutritious foods filled with folate, potassium, fiber, good monounsaturated fats, and antioxidants.  In addition, snacking on nuts makes it less likely non-healthy snacks of processed foods and foods containing trans-fats are in the diet.  Peanuts are not nuts.

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Veronika Bujok's curator insight, December 5, 2013 12:48 PM

Daily handful of nuts for health. Nuts, these are the best natural oils for the body.

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#OnThisDay 150 years ago: 1st presentation on low carbohydrate diet by William Banting

#OnThisDay 150 years ago: 1st presentation on low carbohydrate diet by William Banting | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

In 1863, William Banting wrote a booklet called Letter on Corpulence, Addressed to the Public which contained the particular plan for the diet he followed. It was written in the form of an open letter in the form of a personal testimonial. Banting accounted all of his unsuccessful fasts, diets, spa and exercise regimes in his past, then described the dietary change which finally had worked for him, following the advice of a physician. His own diet was four meals per day, consisting of meat, greens, fruits, and dry wine. The emphasis was on avoiding sugar, saccharine matter, starch, beer, milk and butter. Banting’s pamphlet was popular for years to come, and would be used as a model for modern diets. Initially, he published the booklet at his personal expense. The self-published edition was so popular that he determined to sell it to the general public. The third and later editions were published (see the archived comoplete booklet at he link on teh image) The pamphlet's popularity was such that the question "do you bant?" referred to his method.

From wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Banting

 

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

As a cardiologist, practicing for 20 years I am complicit in the incorrect counsel of patients earlier in my career that was part of government and professional medical societies that recommended eating a low fat and high carbohydrate diet.  This approach has clearly contributed to the obesity and diet issues we face as a society.  The lower carbohydrate, very low sugar diet advocated first 150 years ago is "new again".  For those interested in a well done documentary on the topic, check out he documentary Perfect Human Diet at http://www.perfecthumandiet.us 

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Alexis Dickerson's comment, September 22, 2013 9:39 AM
very cool document!
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Addicted to ... Food?

Addicted to ... Food? | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

A study of 12 men found that glycemic load—distinct from calories or sweetness—can alter brain function and promote overeating. Is there such a thing as food addiction? A study using brain imaging suggests that high-glycemic foods may trigger the same brain mechanism as substance abuse.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

The benefit of the diets which reduce sugar and carbohydrates such as Glycemic Index, Atkins, South Beach, Belly Fat Cure are in part due to the reduced sugar effect on the brain.

From the article: 

This study narrows the difference to one variable only—the glycemic load—and indicates that this factor, distinct from calories or sweetness, can alter brain function and promote overeating. “These findings suggest that limiting high-glycemic index carbohydrates like white bread and potatoes could help obese individuals reduce cravings and control the urge to overeat,

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RISE - The Multi-Media Magazine's curator insight, July 22, 2013 9:35 AM

Read more like this at http://on.fb.me/16FKXNW

shelbylaneMD's curator insight, August 18, 2013 11:53 AM

Addiction and dopamine.  "these foods contain chemical compounds that stimulate the brain's secretion of opiate-like, "feel-good" chemicals like dopamine, which drive our cravings for them....."

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Walnut Consumption Is Associated with Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Women

Walnut Consumption Is Associated with Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Women | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Walnuts are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and have been shown to improve various cardiometabolic risk factors.This trial investigated association between walnut intake & type 2 diabetes in the Nurses’ Health Study which followed 58,063 women aged 52–77 years old from 1998–2008 and
79,893 women aged 35–52 y in NHS II (1999–2009) without diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or cancer at baseline.
Consumption of walnuts and other nuts was assessed every 4 years using food questionnaires. A total of 5930 new type 2 diabetes cases during 10 y of follow-up were detetected. Walnut consumption was associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes for participants consuming 1–3 servings/mo (1 serving = 28 g), 1 serving/wk, and  >2 servings/wk of walnuts: were 0.93,  0.81 and 0.67 compared with women who never/rarely consumed walnuts. Further adjustment for updated BMI slightly attenuated the association and the HRs were 0.96, 0.87 & 0.76 , respectively.

The consumption of total nuts and other tree nuts was also inversely associated with risk of type 2 diabetes, and the associations were largely explained by BMI. Our results suggest that higher walnut consumption is associated with a significantly lower risk of type 2 diabetes in women.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

These results suggest higher walnut consumption is associated with a significantly lower risk of type 2 diabetes in women. Walnuts are rich in healthy fatty acids which have been shown to reduce inflammation in the body and protect against heart disease, cancer and arthritis. Whether walnuts stand alone among tree nuts is uncertain (peanuts are NOT tree nuts).  Practically the benefits from walnuts may be form the appetite filling aspects of eating nuts as a snack and the avoidance of less healthy snacks that are nutritionally poor options because of the high calories and salt intake (like chips).

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Tread Lightly: Labels That Translate Calories into Walking Distance Could Induce People to Eat Less

Tread Lightly: Labels That Translate Calories into Walking Distance Could Induce People to Eat Less | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Including the amount of physical activity needed to burn off the calories from a meal caused people to order on average 200 calories less in an online survey
Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

I usually here the opposite (converse?) of this from my patients.  Patients who use exercise equipment that estimate "calories burned" complain that after exercising for what they think is a reasonable or adequate time they have only burned 300 calories for example.  Since this is less than a candy bar. they get discouraged and often quit not recognizing the many other benefits of exercise on health.  The approach highlighted here helps people avoid the calorie consumption which has great benefit.

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Heart Attack Grill spokesman dies from heart attack

Heart Attack Grill spokesman dies from heart attack | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

The second unofficial spokesman for the Heart Attack Grill in downtown Las Vegas has died from an apparent heart attack.John Alleman suffered a heart attack last week as he waited at the bus stop in front of the restaurant, located inside the Neonopolis at Fremont Street and Las Vegas Boulevard. Alleman was taken off life support shortly after 1 p.m. on Monday, said restaurant owner Jon Basso. He was 52.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

One of the reader's posted an interesting insight about cardiovascular risk prevention and how it seems to have a different staus than other dieases and prevention strategy.  The post says: 

 

"Would a liquor store use a known, raging alcoholic as it's 'spokesperson'?
Would a tobacco company use a person wheezing away with lung disease as their 'spokesperson'?
Would either of them say 'What can we tell you; the guy REALLY liked our product, it's too bad about his health'?
Would it be considered 'funny' & acceptable to call a liquor store 'Cirrhosis Central'? Or, a ciggy shop 'Cancer Corner'? 
Would they offer FREE PRODUCT to people that appear to suffer from the effects of overuse of their goods as part of their AD campaign?
Truth in advertising, I guess...
I just don't get the 'funny' & 'clever' part about it."

 

It' s intersting becuase heart and vascular disease is the number one killer of Americans but diet and exercise recieve a high degree of ridicule.

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Egg consumption and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke

Egg consumption and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Higher consumption of eggs (up to one egg per day) is not associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease or stroke. The increased risk of coronary heart disease among diabetic patients and reduced risk of hemorrhagic stroke associated with higher egg consumption in subgroup analyses warrant further studies.  The authors concluded that the findings of their meta-analysis “do not support a positive association between egg consumption and cardiovascular disease outcomes in the general population

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

The great roller coaster ride of eggs as good, neutral or bad food source continues.  The main problem with eggs is a high level of cholesterol (about 200 mg/ large egg) The dietary limit recommended daily by the AHA is 300 mg.  The great attraction to eggs are that they are high in protein. Several potential reasons for the lack of an overall association between egg consumption and coronary heart disease or stroke re considered in teh discussion. Although dietary cholesterol influences plasma concentrations of serum cholesterol, the effects are relatively small. In addition, epidemiologic studies have found weak or little association between dietary cholesterol intake and cardiovascular disease risk.

 For now we can relax our restriction on eggs.

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Healthy Weight Loss

Healthy Weight Loss | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

A useful approach is to select the best diet that works for you. This
is the eating plan you can live with.
What You Need to Know About Weight Loss
A total of 3500 calories equals 1 pound of body weight. This means if you decrease (or increase) your intake by 500 calories daily, you will lose (or gain) 1 pound per week. (500 calories per day × 7 days = 3500 calories.)
All foods have carbohydrate, protein, and fat.

Carbohydrates provide 4 calories per gram.

Proteins provide 4 calories per gram.
Fats provide 9 calories per gram.
Carbohydrates are either simple or complex. Simple carbohydrates cause more  weight gain than complex carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates include sugar and starches (potatoes, pasta,and rice). Complex carbohydrates include fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

A 500 calorie reduction every day is a good basic rule to begin to have an understanding how to move weight down by about a pound per week - its a good start.  Slightly more advanced calculators are more accurate and can help understand how to move weight to a goal or ideal weight.  For those motivated to change habits on caloric intake these calculators can be very helpful.  See the Pennington Biomedial caculators at

 http://www.pbrc.edu/research-and-faculty/calculators/weight-loss-predictor/

 

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Action-Related Television Content Increases Food Intake

Action-Related Television Content Increases Food Intake | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Television (TV) has generally been blamed for helping make Americans overweight owing to both its distracting influence and its encouragement of a sedentary lifestyle. Indeed, a recent correlational analysis of dinner patterns illustrated that the frequency of TV viewing during dinner was 1 of the 2 largest correlates of adult and child body mass index.

However, the focus to date has been on the medium and not the message. Granted, TV may lead distracted viewers to mindlessly eat past the point at which a person would usually stop. In this, it is not unlike other distracting activities that increase food intake, such as reading, listening to the radio, and interacting with dining companions. However, little is known about whether the content, valence, or pace of content influences how much a viewer eats while watching TV. For instance, how do objective technical characteristics, such as the frequency of visual camera cuts or the variation in sound, influence how much food is eaten?

More distracting TV content appears to increase food consumption: action and sound variation are bad for one’s diet. The more distracting a TV show, the less attention people appear to pay to eating, and the more they eat. Other potential causes, such as increased anxiety, agitation, and stimulation level, should be examined as contributing causes in future research.

While watching the programming, participants were given generous amounts of 4 snacks (M&Ms, cookies, carrots, and grapes) and allowed to eat as much as they wished. Food was weighed before and after the programs to determine the amount eaten by each viewer.

Subjects ate about twice as much watching the action movie compare to the talk show Charlie Rose.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

The paper does a good job highlighting the impact of distraction on overeating. There is a dose effect. The greater the distraction, the greater the over eating.

The talk show that was used in this trial was the Charlie Rose show. It was less distracting than an action movie and highlights the importance of knowing about distraction as a contributor to overeating.  For motivated patients, avoiding snacks when watching TV or having a limited quantity might reduce the hazard.  Alternatively you could limit your viewing to Charlie Rose.

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Healthy Weight Loss

Healthy Weight Loss | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

There are no magic diets, pills, or operations for long-term, healthy weight loss. A useful approach is to select the best diet that works for you. This is the eating plan you can live with.  A total of 3500 calories equals 1 pound of body weight. This means if you decrease (or increase) your intake by 500 calories daily, you will lose (or gain) 1 pound per week. (500 calories per day × 7 days = 3500 calories.) All foods have carbohydrate, protein, and fat. Carbohydrates provide 4 calories per gram. Proteins provide 4 calories per gram. Fats provide 9 calories per gram. Carbohydrates are either simple or complex. Simple carbohydrates cause more weight gain than complex carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates include sugar and starches (potatoes, pasta, and rice). Complex carbohydrates include fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

Most useful (and most difficult) line from this JAMA patient page:

To lose weight, you must change your habits. This will happen slowly. Losing 1 to 2 pounds each week is great progress.

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Olivia Perez's curator insight, November 14, 2014 11:21 PM
the best way to lose the weight you want is to do it the right healthy way. For losing weight you don't want to eat more than 3500 calories but you don't want to eat less than 1100. To lose weight way try to eat healthy and work out to 30 minutes to an hour a day.
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Salt in the Diet

Salt in the Diet | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Table salt is made up of a chemical compound called sodium chloride. The sodium portion of salt is responsible for its health concerns. High sodium intake is linked to high blood pressure, which is known to cause strokes and heart attacks. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans from the US government recommend that adults eat no more than 2300 milligrams (mg) of sodium a day—about 1 teaspoon of salt. Furthermore, for about half of all Americans—those aged 51 years or older, African Americans of any age, and people with high blood pressure, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease—the recommended maximum intake of sodium is 1500 mg a day. Currently, in spite of these recommendations, US adults consume an average of 3400 mg of sodium a day.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:
WHAT SHOULD YOU DO? Eat salt in moderation. Most salt in the diet is “invisible” and is contained in processed and restaurant foods. Therefore, salt intake can be decreased by eating out less often (especially at fast-food restaurants) and eating less prepared or packaged foods. If you do eat out, you can ask to have your meal prepared with less salt. Reading labels on prepared foods to look for sodium content per serving also helps. It is generally healthier to cook using fresh foods rather than buying already prepared or packaged foods.
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Eating healthy is cheaper than you think.

Eating healthy is cheaper than you think. | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) crunched the numbers and it’s official: the healthiest diets cost just $1.50 more than unhealthy diets.

 While cost is an issue in when it comes to adding more fresh produce and leaner meats such as fish in your daily diet, few studies have actually evaluated how much more expensive a healthier diet might be. An analysis of 27 studies from 10 higher income countries that compared price points for healthy and less healthy diets. The price differences per serving and per 200 calories for a variety of specific foods, as well as prices per day and per 2,000 calories, which is the average daily recommended caloric intake for U.S. adults.

The results confirm that healthier fare, like fruits, veggies and fish are more expensive than unhealthy foods like processed meals and snacks and refined grains.  However, swapping out some of these less expensive, and less healthy foods, for fresher and more nutritious ones added up to only about $1.50 more per day.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

The cost, convenience and accessibility of fast food outlets like McDonald's & KFC challenges healthy eating. In my neighborhood, McDonald's offers the family combo (2 Big Macs, 2 McChickens, 4 small fries, 4 small sodas) for $9.99.  KFC has rolled out its $10 Weekend Bucket that offers 10 pieces of chicken for $10.
The value of this research from HSPH is that we can teach that the cost is not an impediment to healthy eating for most Americans.  Fast food accessibility and ease of use is still something that requires education: it's easier to buy a meal at a drive through window than it is to make a salad.
Like most healthy life strategies including exercise and diet - the healthy way is not the easier way.

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Donovan Baldwin's curator insight, December 6, 2013 8:12 PM

Why skimp when it comes to good health. You'll wind up paying more in the long run.

Veronika Bujok's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:08 AM

people have taste, not have the time and willingness, but cooking is fun and live healthy is an art

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Eat a Healthy Diet and Drink Wisely to Postpone Dying If You Survived a Myocardial Infarction

Eat a Healthy Diet and Drink Wisely to Postpone Dying If You Survived a Myocardial Infarction | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

The Mediterranean diet as the most likely dietary model to provide protection against CHD.  Increasing adherence to the Mediterranean diet has been consistently beneficial for prevention of major chronic diseases, including fatal and nonfatal CHD, as well as all-cause mortality.

 In 4098 participants in the Nurses’ Health Study who survived an initial MI.  average dietary quality improved only marginally post-MI among the highly educated health professionals

Nevertheless, for participants who increased the diet/nutrition score, there was a 29% reduction in all-cause mortality and a 40% reduction in cardiovascular mortality. The AHEI2010 diet score used includes 11 components: vegetables, fruits, nuts and legumes, red meat and processed meats, sugar-sweetened beverages, alcohol, polyunsaturated fat, trans fat, omega-3 fat, whole grains, and sodium intake.

Many of the recommendations regarding these foods and nutrients are similar to the traditional Mediterranean diet: high consumption of whole grains, fruits, and vegetables; substantial intake of protein from plant sources (nuts and legumes); moderate intake of polyunsaturated fat; fish as a source of omega-3 fatty acids; and alcohol; and a low consumption of trans fat, meat and meat products, and sugar-sweetened beverages.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

From the Editorial: Patients who survive an MI are likely to receive up-to-date medical care, including cardiac rehabilitation, antiplatelet therapy, statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and β-blockers. These interventions reduce the chances of a second MI, but a sizable residual risk  persists. The message from this study is that MI survivors should eat a healthy diet and drink wisely to further reduce the risk of subsequent cardiovascular death or simply postpone dying.

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Fat Chance or Fat Choice? | Review of Fat Chance: The bitter truth about sugar

Fat Chance or Fat Choice? | Review of Fat Chance: The bitter truth about sugar | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

We see many examples of people who have never really engaged with behaviour change and many who have tried hard but failed to achieve any meaningful outcome. So, how do we encourage real, life-changing and long-lasting behaviour change in our patients? When faced with many disappointments, can it even work?

Lustig spends most of the first half of the book explaining why behaviour change alone is so difficult. Our bodies have multiple adaptations to protect our body weight and we do not relinquish it without a fight. This battle is waged day by day in our guts (gut hormones) and our brains (leptin) making sustained weight loss incredibly difficult. Lustig clearly believes that individual behaviour change, while important, is inadequate to fully tackle the global obesity epidemic. Orchestrating this disaster, according to Lustig, is a food environment which has changed dramatically over the last 50 years in the Western World, in parallel to the rise in obesity, and Lustig argues that tackling this aspect of our culture should be a greater concern.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

My patients' food environments are the biggest impediment to successful lifestyle modification adn weitght loss.

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Steve Kingsley's curator insight, October 1, 2013 8:41 PM

Yes, it's much more than changing one's diet - it really is about changing one's life style.

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Can something as small as a candy wrapper help you lose weight?

Can something as small as a candy wrapper help you lose weight? | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Even small obstacles to snacking, such as wrappers on candy, can help people who want to lose weight. A study suggests eating is an automatic behavior that can be disrupted when any additional effort is required to serve oneself.
Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

The food industry has done a fantastic job lowering barriers to food and this has contributed to the obesity epidemic.  Even healthy foods like fruits now have less obstacles:  no seeds in grapes,oranges, watermelon and the serving size of foods including fruits has significantly increased and the fruit growers have bred fruits with higher levels of sugar to appeal to the American diet.    Reducng obstacles has been a win for the food industry (manufacturers and agri-business) but taken a significant toll on American health.

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Western Diet lowers odds of "ideal aging"

Western Diet lowers odds of "ideal aging" | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Background

The impact of diet on specific age-related diseases has been studied extensively, but few investigations have adopted a more holistic approach to determine the association of diet with overall health at older ages. We examined whether diet, assessed in midlife, using dietary patterns and adherence to the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), is associated with aging phenotypes, identified after a mean 16-year follow-up.

Methods

Data were drawn from the Whitehall II cohort study of 5350 adults (age 51.3±5.3 years, 29.4% women). Diet was assessed at baseline (1991-1993). Mortality, chronic diseases, and functioning were ascertained from hospital data, register linkage, and screenings every 5 years and were used to create 5 outcomes at follow-up: ideal aging (free of chronic conditions and high performance in physical, mental, and cognitive functioning tests; 4%), nonfatal cardiovascular event (7.3%), cardiovascular death (2.8%), noncardiovascular death (12.7%), and normal aging (73.2%).

Results

Low adherence to the AHEI was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and noncardiovascular death. In addition, participants with a “Western-type” diet (characterized by high intakes of fried and sweet food, processed food and red meat, refined grains, and high-fat dairy products) had lower odds of ideal aging (odds ratio for top vs bottom tertile: 0.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.36-0.94; P=.02), independently of other health behaviors.

Conclusions

By considering healthy aging as a composite of cardiovascular, metabolic, musculoskeletal, respiratory, mental, and cognitive function, the present study offers a new perspective on the impact of diet on aging phenotypes.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

"Western-type” diet (characterized by high intakes of fried and sweet food, processed food and red meat, refined grains, and high-fat dairy products) has been attributed to many disease of older age. This study characterizes ideal aging as avoidance of these disease. The additional life style strategies of exercise and smoking are strongly associated with favorable aging but diet is an independent predictor.  It makes common sense that the cumulative effect of daily diet over the middle third of life will have an impact on outcomes in the last third of life.

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Cynthia Tait's comment, May 18, 2013 1:24 AM
hmmm - this sounds all to plausible - not sure I am going to share this with my parents - as this will mean they have been on the right path all their lives - searching and reading and modifying their diets to suit the long lives they wish to live. Go Mum and Dad. <yeah, I still didn't share it with them - i can hear the 'i told you so' echoes through from the future> :)
Alexis Dickerson's curator insight, September 22, 2013 9:44 AM

Standard American Diet = SAD diet.  Ancestoral health diets seek historic dietary principles with the goal of restoring/optimizing health and reducing diseases of affluence (diabesity, CHD, etc)

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5 fad diets we wish would go away forever

5 fad diets we wish would go away forever | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Spring is around the corner and so will be a new crop of fad diets eager to help you get into shape. Be on the lookout for a return of these repackaged crazy f
Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

FIve diets that have no research support and make little common sense but have had significant popularity.  Eat what you enjoy, but stay lean: avoid what you don't love and continually reasses what you can do without.

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Vincent D'Antonio's curator insight, June 10, 2013 9:01 AM

Fad diets

Daddyjo's curator insight, July 21, 2014 11:18 AM

Fad diets are just a bunch of bogus nonsense. They make you feel lethargic, tired and weak. At the end of the diet, you may have lost weight, but it is mostly water weight and the minute you go back to your old diet, you gain back everything you have 'lost' and are back to square one. I've done fad diets alot in my past and trust me, it doesn't work! #eatclean

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Mediterranean Diet of Olive Oil, Nuts, Reduces Heart Disease

Mediterranean Diet of Olive Oil, Nuts, Reduces Heart Disease | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

A diet with lots of olive oil and nuts cuts the risk of stroke and other major cardiovascular problems by 30% among high-risk people, according to a new study. 

There's a large body of research linking a Mediterranean diet—one heavy on fruits, vegetables, fish and beans—to heart health. But this study, published Monday in the New England Journal of Medicine, is significant both for its size—it followed 7,447 people in Spain over almost 5 years—and its scientific rigor. Many previous studies haven't been able to prove direct cause and effect or have assessed the diet's impact only on certain cardiovascular risk factors, like blood pressure or cholesterol.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

THE MEDITERRANEAN DIET = TASTES GOOD AND GOOD FOR YOU!

At the end of the study 3.8%, of the Mediterranean-diet-plus-olive-oil and 3.4% of the Mediterranean-diet-plus-nuts groups suffered a heart attack, stroke or death from cardiovascular disease. By comparison, 4.4% of members in the control group suffered this outcome. The reduction is the risk of stroke was statistically significant. The reduction in the risk of heart attack was not, possibly because of low incidence of heart attacks among people in the study, researchers said.

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We Sleep How We Eat

We Sleep How We Eat | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
It's no secret: We are what we eat. And turns out, we might sleep how we eat, too.

Found an association between the number of calories consumed and how long the study participants slept. Those who consumed the most were more likely to be "short" sleepers. Interestingly enough, "normal" sleepers were the next type to consume a lot of calories, followed by "very short" sleepers and then "long" sleepers, researchers found.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

The impact of poor sleep on craving for carbohydrate is well known.  This may be why there is a link between sleep apnea and obesity.  Poor sleep increases appetite which increases obesity which may cause upper airway obtruction and more sleep apnea that takes us back to an increase in appetite ( a nevere ending cycle).  Anecdotally most people will admit that being up all night at work, or caring for a child results in an almost insatiable appetite the next day.

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Tina Bilazarian's comment, February 12, 2013 7:57 PM
So will go to bed early and don't work all nite... Will take the advice.