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Media, News & Topics on prevention, diagnosis & treatment of cardiovascular disease
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How does caffeine affect exercise?

How does caffeine affect exercise? | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
High levels of caffeine, especially in individuals who do not consume caffeine on a regular basis, may play a role in caffeine toxicity.
Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

Given the increase in caffeine availability and reports of adverse events, an understanding of the cardiac effects of caffeine is urgently required. This review summarizes the available medical literature specifically relating to caffeine ingestion and reduced exercise coronary blood flow, suggesting possible mechanisms. This review specifically focuses on the effects of caffeine on the coronary arteries, especially the reduced coronary blood flow noted with exercise.

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Cuppa Joe: Friend or Foe?

Coffee Consumption and Cardiovascular Risk: Over the past three decades, many epidemiologic
studies have extensively examined the cardiovascular risk (CV) effects of coffee consumption, yet the issue remains controversial. Case–control studies have tended to implicate coffee as  potentially increasing CV risk, whereas prospective cohort studies have tended to show no associations with coffee intake and CV disease, even among individuals with higher coffee consumption. A brief review of relevant findings follows.

Summary
Currently available data from prospective studies suggests that coffee consumption may decrease the risk of T2DM, and neurodegenerative diseases such as AD and PD. Coffee does not appear to increase the risk of CHD. Coffee consumption could plausibly confer reductions in risks for diabetes, stroke, total mortality, neuro-degenerative diseases, and depression. The precise nature of the relation between coffee and BP is not yet clear, although most evidence suggests that chronic coffee intake does not raise BP to a clinically significant degree, & does not increase risk of development if HTN. Available data suggest that coffee intake of up to 6 cups/day does not affect QT interval or risk of serious dysrhythmias. The currently available evidence on coffee consumption and risk of CV disease is largely reassuring. The majority of studies also showed that there may be a modest inverse relationship between coffee consumption and all-cause mortality. The observational data do not prove a cause-and-effect relationship, and thus increasing coffee as a prevention strategy cannot currently be recommended. 

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Coffee May Be Linked to Longer Life, But…

Coffee May Be Linked to Longer Life, But… | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Coffee drinkers are getting a bit more reassurance that their beverage of choice may not be bad for them, and might even be linked to living longer.

The upshot was that the more coffee people drank, the less risk they had of dying within the study’s time span. Men who drank six or more cups of coffee a day had a 10% lower risk than those who drank none, while for women it was 15% lower. The trend was consistent for deaths from a number of major causes such as heart disease, diabetes, stroke and even injuries and accidents. (The authors noted that the association “could reflect chance.”) One major exception was cancer, where coffee drinkers saw no advantage.
The findings weren’t affected by whether the coffee was caffeinated or not, but it’s unclear what, if anything, in the drink might have a positive health impact 

Indeed, the study has lots of limits. One is the risk that the effect of other things that change health, like smoking, may not have been completely filtered out. When all of these other influences were left in, coffee drinkers actually tended to have a higher risk of dying than those who abstained. 

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Caffeine found to boost positivity

Caffeine found to boost positivity | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

More good news for "coffee achievers".  I think we already knew this.

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(Relaxnews) - Is a strong cup of coffee a happiness elixir? New research finds that caffeine may take the negative edge off of the world, and focus your mind on positivity.

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15 Things Worth Knowing About Coffee

15 Things Worth Knowing About Coffee | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

History, trade, agriculture, animal husbandry, botany and brain chemistry about the most important legal stimulant on one poster.

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