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Media, News & Topics on prevention, diagnosis & treatment of cardiovascular disease
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A Patient’s Guide to Recovery After Deep Vein Thrombosis or Pulmonary Embolism

A Patient’s Guide to Recovery After Deep Vein Thrombosis or Pulmonary Embolism | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

When a blood clot forms in the deep veins of the body, it is called deep vein thrombosis (DVT). DVT occurs most commonly in the leg; however, it can occur anywhere in the body, such as the veins in the arm, abdomen, pelvis, and around the brain. A complication of DVT in legs and arms is pulmonary embolism (PE). A PE occurs when a blood clot breaks off from a DVT and travels through the blood stream, traversing the right atrium and right ventricle, and lodging in the lung.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

Nice summary for patients wanting to have more information about PE and DVT.   The FAQs adressed are:

How Long Will I Need Treatment With an Anticoagulant? Which Anticoagulant Will I Receive? When Will My Clot and Pain Go Away? How Soon Can I Be Physically Active? What Kind of Doctor Do I Need?

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2012 ACCP Guidelines – DVT and PE: Highlights and Summary

2012 ACCP Guidelines – DVT and PE: Highlights and Summary | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

The 2012 ACCP Guidelines on treatement for DVT and PE is 802 pages long.  What it has in comprehensiveness it lacks in user friendliness.  This highlight & summary document on one page is a great resource.  It highlights changes especially in duration of treatment for Pulmonary embolism (PE) & Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) patients.

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Does eating lunch at your desk increase blood clot risk?

Does eating lunch at your desk increase blood clot risk? | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

The claim: “Eating lunch at your desk could increase your risk of DVT”—was the dramatic headline from UK’s Marie Claire magazine which caught my attention. (1) The online story went on to say that “Almost 75 per cent of office staff aged 21-30 who work 10-hour days don’t get up to take a break. This could double chances of a fatal blood clot.” The story was light on citing scientific evidence to back up this claim, so, as someone interested in DVT education (and admittedly, who eats at her desk routinely), I decided to investigate if this assertion is true: Does eating lunch at your desk increase blood clot risk?

The answer: Yes. The act of eating lunch at your desk, in and of itself, does not increase blood clot risk; but the immobility associated with prolonged sitting at your desk, does.

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