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Heart and Vascular Health
Media, News & Topics on prevention, diagnosis & treatment of cardiovascular disease
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My Life Check - Life's Simple 7™

My Life Check - Life's Simple 7™ | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

Learn about the state of your heart and what you can do to live better. Take the My Life Check Assessment. I recommend reviewing the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 to learn about your cardiovascular health in a patient-friendly format. You can go through the Life’s Simple 7 assessments and bring those numbers, as well as your questions, to your doctor.

Just recently a patient with a family history of heart disease asked, “Am I doing everything I can to avoid developing coronary heart disease as I get older?” We looked at the computer in my office together for an introduction to Life’s Simple 7.

I also explained how to sign up on the AHA’s Heart360 website, where you can enter and track personal cardiovascular health information (such as blood pressure, weight, glucose and cholesterol measurements, and medications). It was easy. And within less than 15 minutes we were linked up on Heart360, which patients and doctors can use to communicate online — quickly and securely — about a patient’s health."

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

The AHA's Simple 7 is a great place for people to start to begin to know aboiut strategies that can reduce lifetime risk of heart attack and stroke.

The SEVEN are listed but the website does a great job explaining each in detail:

1.  Get Active 

2. Control Cholesterol

3. Eat Better

4. Manage Blood Pressure

5.  Lose Weight

6. Reduce Blood Sugar

7.  Stop Smoking

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Steve Kingsley's curator insight, November 17, 2013 5:13 PM

Simple to prescribe... hard to follow for most.

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Mobile App: Pocket First Aid & CPR from AHA

Get Pocket First Aid & CPR from the American Heart Association on the App Store. See screenshots and ratings, and read customer reviews.
Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

An app that could save a life.

Screen shots on emergency first aid and CPR.

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Cardiovascular Health among Adult Americans - state by state - Only 3.3% ideal

Cardiovascular Health among Adult Americans - state by state - Only 3.3% ideal | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

AHA recently proposed a new metric of cardiovascular health comprised of 7 health behaviors and factors. State-level assessments have not been reported. Using 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data from all 50 states and District of Columbia. As data are self-reported, the AHA definition of cardiovascular health was modified using self-reported:

1. hypertension

2. high cholesterol

3. diabetes

4. current smoking status

5. weight classification

6. physical activity

7. dietary behavior

Ideal cardiovascular health was defined as meeting current guidelines or standards from each behavior or factor. The percentage of population in each state with ideal cardiovascular health and the adjusted prevalence ratio of ideal cardiovascular health in each state were estimated (adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity and levels of education).

In 2009, 3.3% reported as ideal cardiovascular health (n = 356,441). Large disparities of ideal cardiovascular health existed by age, sex, race/ethnicity and level of education - the elderly, males, non-Hispanic blacks and those with lower levels of education were less likely to have ideal cardiovascular health. The percentage of population with ideal cardiovascular health varied by state, ranging from 1.2% to 6.9%. In conclusion, the prevalence of ideal cardiovascular health is very low in the US adult population and varies substantially by state.

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Heart Health in Future Foretold in Teens

Heart Health in Future Foretold in Teens | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it
Many U.S. adolescents are already on their way to increased cardiovascular risk in adulthood, researchers found.

Roughly half of about 5,000 study participants ages 12 to 19 (54.7% of males and 50.5% of females) met "ideal" standards for fewer than five of the seven variables developed by the American Heart Association to define cardiovascular health, according to Christina Shay, PhD, of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City, and colleagues.

And 0% met all seven variables including not smoking and having low total cholesterol, the researchers reported online in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:

Will this be the first generation that has worse health than the prior generation?  It is amazing that 0% of the surveyed teens met all the ideal seven variables:

Cardiovascular health among adolescents is defined using the ideal state of seven variables:

Smoking status (never smoked)Body mass index (BMI below the 85th percentile)Dietary intake (consumption of healthy levels of at least four of the following: vegetables, fish, whole grains, sodium, and added sugar in sugar-sweetened beverages)Physical activity (at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity a day)Blood pressure (below the 90th percentile)Blood glucose (less than 100 mg/dLTotal cholesterol (less than 170 mg/dL)

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Change your salty ways in only 21 days from AHA

Change your salty ways in only 21 days from AHA | Heart and Vascular Health | Scoop.it

the everyday meal offender that might make your face feel puffy and your jeans look, and feel, tighter.  Did you know that by reducing your sodium intake during a three week period you can change your sodium palate and start enjoying foods with less sodium?  On Jan. 7, step up to the plate, re-charge your taste buds and give your heart-health a boost with the new Sodium Swap Challenge from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. 

Seth Bilazarian, MD's insight:
Here’s an outline of how you can kick-off your own Sodium Swap Challenge: -          Week 1 – Start by tackling your consumption of breads and rolls as well as cold cuts and cured meats.  For example, one piece of bread can have as much as 230 milligrams of sodium while a serving of turkey cold cuts could contain as much as 1,050 milligrams of sodium.  When your recommended daily intake is kept to 1,500 milligrams or less, it’s amazing how fast it all adds up.  Check your labels on these items, look for lower sodium items and track your sodium consumption each day and log how much you’ve shaved out of your diet. Portion control does make a difference.  Foods eaten several times a day add up to a lot of sodium, even though each serving is not high. -          Week 2 – Keep that momentum going!  This week’s foods include pizza and poultry.  If you’re going to eat pizza, try to aim for one with less cheese and meats or lower sodium versions of these items or try something different and add veggies instead.  When cooking for your family this week use fresh, skinless poultry that is not enhanced with sodium solution rather than fried or processed.  Keep your eyes on the 1,500 milligrams of sodium each day and, again, log your results. -          Week 3 – As you round out your challenge and embark on the last week of your challenge, your focus includes soups and sandwiches.  The two together typically make a tasty lunch or dinner duo, but one cup of chicken noodle or tomato soup may have up to 940 milligrams – it varies by brand --and, after you add all of your meats, cheeses and condiments to your sandwich, you can easily surpass  1,500 milligrams in one day.  This week, when choosing a soup, check the label and try lower sodium varieties of your favorites and make your sandwiches with lower sodium meats and cheeses and try to eliminate piling on your condiments.  Be sure to track your sodium and try to keep your daily consumption to less than 1,500 milligrams.
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