Healthy Vision 2020
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Healthy Vision 2020
Bringing into focus a clear and distinct view of the rest of this decade in Texas health care. Offering a sharp perception of what lies ahead and what we must change to keep us all healthy.
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Potter: Legislators should seize opportunity to restore family...

Two years ago, the Texas House cut funding for the state’s family planning program by two-thirds, from $111 million to $37.
Texas Medical Association's insight:

Invest in preventive care for low-income women

 

Lost in the highly charged political debate is the fact that “women’s health” includes far more than abortions. Now that the federal government has withdrawn its support, the state must continue to find a way to ensure that women continue to have access to preventive services and to finance a robust Texas Women’s Health Program..

 

The Women’s Health Program, which does not provide abortions, delivers cost-effective basic health care screenings — such as for cancer, high blood pressure, and diabetes — as well as birth control. This is the only source of such preventive care for many low-income women in Texas.

 

More than 70 percent of pregnancies among single young women in Texas are unplanned.Increasing the number of women who enroll in the Women’s Health Program after a Medicaid delivery is especially important. Women who have had a Medicaid-funded delivery are at particularly high risk for subsequent pregnancy, often so soon that risks of prematurity and low birth weight are elevated. Babies born too soon or too small often have significant health problems, such as respiratory or developmental delays, contributing to higher medical costs at birth and as the child ages. In 2007, unplanned Medicaid births cost the state more than $1.2 billion.

 

If we want healthy children and adults – healthy Texans – who are not going to continue to be a burden on the social welfare system, then we should champion ways to make individuals responsible for their contraception and personal health. Texas must educate young people about contraception. Studies show educating teenagers about contraception actually delays sexual intercourse and decreases unintended pregnancies. By rebuilding Women’s Health Program, Texas can give young couples the tools to take responsibility for their future and protect their own health and their children’s.

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Religious leaders urge funding for family planning, birth control

Dozens of clergy members took to the Capitol on Monday to ask the Legislature to restore family planning funding and to counter assertions that all religious leaders support those cuts.
Texas Medical Association's insight:

Invest in preventive care for low-income women

 

Lost in the highly charged political debate is the fact that “women’s health” includes far more than abortions. Now that the federal government has withdrawn its support, the state must continue to find a way to ensure that women continue to have access to preventive services and to finance a robust Texas Women’s Health Program..

 

The Women’s Health Program, which does not provide abortions, delivers cost-effective basic health care screenings — such as for cancer, high blood pressure, and diabetes — as well as birth control. This is the only source of such preventive care for many low-income women in Texas.

 

More than 70 percent of pregnancies among single young women in Texas are unplanned.Increasing the number of women who enroll in the Women’s Health Program after a Medicaid delivery is especially important. Women who have had a Medicaid-funded delivery are at particularly high risk for subsequent pregnancy, often so soon that risks of prematurity and low birth weight are elevated. Babies born too soon or too small often have significant health problems, such as respiratory or developmental delays, contributing to higher medical costs at birth and as the child ages. In 2007, unplanned Medicaid births cost the state more than $1.2 billion.

 

If we want healthy children and adults – healthy Texans – who are not going to continue to be a burden on the social welfare system, then we should champion ways to make individuals responsible for their contraception and personal health. Texas must educate young people about contraception. Studies show educating teenagers about contraception actually delays sexual intercourse and decreases unintended pregnancies. By rebuilding Women’s Health Program, Texas can give young couples the tools to take responsibility for their future and protect their own health and their children’s.

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Burning

Burning | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it

Insightful cartoon from the Houston Chronicle.

 

TMA Says: The Women’s Health Program, which does not provide abortions, delivers cost-effective basic health care screenings — such as for cancer, high blood pressure, and diabetes — as well as birth control. This is the only source of such preventive care for many low-income women in Texas.

 

Our recommendation: Continue full funding for the Texas Women’s Health Program.

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Houston-area school districts adopt new take on sex ed

Houston-area school districts adopt new take on sex ed | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it

Some Houston-area school districts are shifting away from traditional abstinence-only sex education classes this school year, part of a statewide trend that has prompted concern among some parents that kids are learning too much, too soon about sex.

 

Texas needs to support our citizens in taking more responsibility for their health and health care decisions.

 

The key to maintaining health lies in helping patients assume responsibility for their own health with regular support from their physicians. Competent, compassionate medical care, delivered with professionalism, state-of-the-art clinical knowledge, and patient respect are critical components of this responsibility. Conversely, patients have a responsibility to make informed, healthy decisions. 

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Compromise quells potential family-planning fight

Compromise quells potential family-planning fight | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it
The Texas House avoided a protracted, potentially volatile debate Thursday when both sides of the abortion issue agreed to withdraw about a dozen family-planning amendments from consideration.
Texas Medical Association's insight:

Invest in preventive care for low-income women

 

Lost in the highly charged political debate is the fact that “women’s health” includes far more than abortions. Now that the federal government has withdrawn its support, the state must continue to find a way to ensure that women continue to have access to preventive services and to finance a robust Texas Women’s Health Program..

 

The Women’s Health Program, which does not provide abortions, delivers cost-effective basic health care screenings — such as for cancer, high blood pressure, and diabetes — as well as birth control. This is the only source of such preventive care for many low-income women in Texas.

 

More than 70 percent of pregnancies among single young women in Texas are unplanned.Increasing the number of women who enroll in the Women’s Health Program after a Medicaid delivery is especially important. Women who have had a Medicaid-funded delivery are at particularly high risk for subsequent pregnancy, often so soon that risks of prematurity and low birth weight are elevated. Babies born too soon or too small often have significant health problems, such as respiratory or developmental delays, contributing to higher medical costs at birth and as the child ages. In 2007, unplanned Medicaid births cost the state more than $1.2 billion.

 

If we want healthy children and adults – healthy Texans – who are not going to continue to be a burden on the social welfare system, then we should champion ways to make individuals responsible for their contraception and personal health. Texas must educate young people about contraception. Studies show educating teenagers about contraception actually delays sexual intercourse and decreases unintended pregnancies. By rebuilding Women’s Health Program, Texas can give young couples the tools to take responsibility for their future and protect their own health and their children’s.

more...
No comment yet.
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Kyle Janek: The Texas Medicine Interview

Kyle Janek: The Texas Medicine Interview | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it
New Texas Health and Human Services Executive Commissioner Kyle Janek, MD, has concerns about Medicaid - about having enough physicians to care for patients, about how to improve the health insurer, and other thoughts he shares with Texas Medicine...
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Texas Medical Association's comment, January 2, 2013 9:00 AM
Check out the video! www.texmed.org/JanekInterview
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Our View: Politics is putting health care for indigent women in jeopardy

Abortion has always been a controversial issue and will always be one. Whenever the political live wire of abortion is thrust into the political arena for any reason, it should be considered only on its own merits.

 

The Women’s Health Program, which does not provide abortions, delivers cost-effective basic health care screenings — such as for cancer, high blood pressure, and diabetes — as well as birth control. This is the only source of such preventive care for many low-income women in Texas.

 

More than 70 percent of pregnancies among single young women in Texas are unplanned. Increasing the number of women who enroll in the Women’s Health Program after a Medicaid delivery is especially important. Women who have had a Medicaid-funded delivery are at particularly high risk for subsequent pregnancy, often so soon that risks of prematurity and low birth weight are elevated. Babies born too soon or too small often have significant health problems, such as respiratory or developmental delays, contributing to higher medical costs at birth and as the child ages. In 2007, unplanned Medicaid births cost the state more than $1.2 billion.

more...
No comment yet.