Healthy Vision 2020
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Healthy Vision 2020
Bringing into focus a clear and distinct view of the rest of this decade in Texas health care. Offering a sharp perception of what lies ahead and what we must change to keep us all healthy.
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Medical practice action plan: Overcome regulation overload

Medical practice action plan: Overcome regulation overload | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it
Health care is experiencing a major overhaul, and practices face the brunt of the changes. Careful planning is needed to guide practices through it all.
Texas Medical Association's insight:

Eliminate costs and hassles that don’t contribute to or add value to patient care

 

New compliance requirements are bombarding physician practices seemingly every day. Just in January 2012, a new electronic format for claims and other electronic transactions (called “HIPAA 5010”) added new costs to physician practices. The switch to the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems version 10 (ICD-10), currently set for October 2014, will require the adoption of an entirely new coding system to record all possible diagnoses and inpatient procedures. It will add significant physician and staff training costs.

 

Medicare’s required new PQRS provides a monetary incentive at first but imposes penalties beginning in 2015. A number of new state and federal privacy laws introduce more administrative burden, and severe new penalties for noncompliance. State and federal governments are using more “fraud” detection, resulting in monumental compliance programs that further increase the cost of running a practice. TMA and dozens of other medical societies have written to CMS “about the imminent storm that is about to occur due to simultaneous implementation of multiple programs that will create extraordinary financial and administrative burden, as well as mass confusion, for physicians.” These changes have limited documented evidence they will lower fraud or improve privacy, but complete assurance they will increase the cost of doing business in medicine.

 

It’s because of the vast number of complex commercial insurance and federal and state regulations that affect physicians and their patients that TMA developed the Deadlines for Doctors. (www.texmed.org/deadlines)

 

The cost to operate a physician’s office continues to climb unabated. Unfunded mandates and hidden regulatory burdens like the ongoing hassles of annually renewing state registration to continue to prescribe needed medications for patients threaten the viability of practices and patients’ access to care. The average cost to staff and run a practice now exceeds $500,000 per physician, and that’s before the physician gets paid a dime. These excessive administrative expenses add to the escalating cost of medical care that are borne by patients, employers, and taxpayers.

 

Excessive regulations also hurt local economies, which receive nearly $1 million in wages and benefits for each physician in practice. Physician offices employ support staff and often work with nonphysician providers, increasing the total number of employees in the industry to well above the count of physicians alone. In 2009, Texas office-based physicians supported 249,010 jobs. On average, each office-based physician supported 5.8 jobs, including his or her own.

 

Texas should not burden practices with additional regulatory costs that provide no benefit to patients or their health care.

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The Avalanche Of New Obamacare Rules Will Come In January, 2013 - Forbes

The Avalanche Of New Obamacare Rules Will Come In January, 2013 - Forbes | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it

Deadlines are looming for ObamaCare for programs that are required to begin in 2014.

 

TMA Says:

Unfortunately, the PPACA was not the genesis of physician regulation, nor are these busy rulemakers limited to the federal government. “An extensive regulatory framework … arose haphazardly, with little consideration of how the pieces fit together,” the Federal Trade Commission and U.S. Department of Justice reported in 2004.[i] The huge numbers of state and federal regulations and their haphazard nature place tremendous burdens on physicians’ practices, most of which are still small businesses. These rules insert themselves between physicians and their patients, frequently do little to improve patient care, and divert physicians’ time and energy away from the patients in the exam room. We need to repeal, reorganize, and reprioritize if we want a functional health care delivery system.


[i] Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission. Improving Health Care: A Dose of Competition. July 2004. Available at http://www.justice.gov/atr/public/health_care/204694.pdf. Accessed April 2012.

 

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TMA Wants ICD-10 Canned

TMA Wants ICD-10 Canned | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it
TMA is glad the federal government postponed adoption of the ICD-10 coding system until 2014 but believes it should completely scrap ICD-10 for a more up to date coding system. If officials don' t do that, then they should delay ICD-10 even longer.
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What HHS/OCR Will Look for in HIPAA Compliance Audits

What HHS/OCR Will Look for in HIPAA Compliance Audits | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it
The HHS Office for Civil Rights, now reviewing the results of its pilot HIPAA compliance audit program, is planning a more streamlined audit process but an expanded pool of organizations audited in the permanent program, says OCR Director Leon...
Texas Medical Association's insight:

Eliminate costs and hassles that don’t contribute to or add value to patient care

 

The cost to operate a physician’s office continues to climb unabated. Unfunded mandates and hidden regulatory burdens like the ongoing hassles of annually renewing state registration to continue to prescribe needed medications for patients threaten the viability of practices and patients’ access to care. The average cost to staff and run a practice now exceeds $500,000 per physician, and that’s before the physician gets paid a dime. These excessive administrative expenses add to the escalating cost of medical care that are borne by patients, employers, and taxpayers.

 

Excessive regulations also hurt local economies, which receive nearly $1 million in wages and benefits for each physician in practice. Physician offices employ support staff and often work with nonphysician providers, increasing the total number of employees in the industry to well above the count of physicians alone. In 2009, Texas office-based physicians supported 249,010 jobs. On average, each office-based physician supported 5.8 jobs, including his or her own.

 

Texas should not burden practices with additional regulatory costs that provide no benefit to patients or their health care.

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HHS Finalizes ICD-10 Deadline Delay to Oct. 1, 2014

In issuing the final rule, the Department of Health and Human Services postpones until Oct.

 

"The timing of the transition could not be worse, as many physicians already are spending significant time and resources implementing electronic health records in their practices, meeting meaningful use regulations, adapting to a host of new Medicare and Medicaid policies, and hurdling other administrative burdens created by the new health law," Dr. Speer said.

 

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