Healthy Vision 2020
Follow
2.1K views | +0 today
Healthy Vision 2020
Bringing into focus a clear and distinct view of the rest of this decade in Texas health care. Offering a sharp perception of what lies ahead and what we must change to keep us all healthy.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Texas Medical Association
Scoop.it!

Criminally negligent physical education

Did it really take the American Medical Association to tell us this? The AMA has pronounced childhood obesity a disease — also, that boiling water scalds and wood splinters.
Texas Medical Association's insight:

Invest in obesity control

 

Overweight and obesity contribute to diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, cancer, and stroke. Texas has an easy-to-see obesity crisis. Some 66 percent of Texas adults are overweight or obese; the United States average is 63 percent. During the past three decades, obesity rates in children have more than tripled in the country. Today, 32 percent of Texas children (ages 10-17) are obese.

 

The obesity epidemic, and the ever-younger age groups that it strikes, threatens Texas’ physical and fiscal health. Texas’ continually expanding waistline correlates to our health care cost demands. Obesity is responsible for 27 percent of the growth in health care spending. Treating obese patients costs 37 percent more than treating normal-weight patients.

 

The rise in overweight and obesity is affecting the bottom line of Texas employers. The Texas Comptroller’s Office found that in 2009, obesity cost Texas businesses an estimated $9.5 billion, due to higher employee insurance costs, absenteeism, and other effects. Left unchecked, obesity could cost employers $32.5 billion annually by 2030.

 

Improved physical health in students has been linked to academic success. Conversely, children with obesity are more prone to absences and lower grades. In the United States, students who are physically active at least 60 minutes on most days, play on at least one sports team, or watch fewer than three hours of television per day consistently have “mostly A’s.”

 

A great proportion of obese adults were overweight or obese as children. This serious risk factor is found in Texas, where more than 30 percent of children in grades 4 through 11 are overweight or obese. A child who is overweight at age 12 has a 75-percent chance of being overweight as an adult.

 

There is no single solution to preventing or addressing obesity. Multiple evidence-based approaches must be pursued for physicians, communities, schools, and workplaces, and each must identify potential barriers to implementing local programs.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Texas Medical Association
Scoop.it!

Bills aim to help schools make kids healthy

Bills aim to help schools make kids healthy | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it
Two bills dealing with what kids consume at school are under consideration by the Texas House on Tuesday.
Texas Medical Association's insight:

Invest in obesity control

Overweight and obesity contribute to diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, cancer, and stroke. Texas has an easy-to-see obesity crisis. Some 66 percent of Texas adults are overweight or obese; the United States average is 63 percent. During the past three decades, obesity rates in children have more than tripled in the country. Today, 32 percent of Texas children (ages 10-17) are obese.

 

The obesity epidemic, and the ever-younger age groups that it strikes, threatens Texas’ physical and fiscal health. Texas’ continually expanding waistline correlates to our health care cost demands. Obesity is responsible for 27 percent of the growth in health care spending. Treating obese patients costs 37 percent more than treating normal-weight patients.

The rise in overweight and obesity is affecting the bottom line of Texas employers. The Texas Comptroller’s Office found that in 2009, obesity cost Texas businesses an estimated $9.5 billion, due to higher employee insurance costs, absenteeism, and other effects. Left unchecked, obesity could cost employers $32.5 billion annually by 2030.

 

Improved physical health in students has been linked to academic success. Conversely, children with obesity are more prone to absences and lower grades. In the United States, students who are physically active at least 60 minutes on most days, play on at least one sports team, or watch fewer than three hours of television per day consistently have “mostly A’s.”

A great proportion of obese adults were overweight or obese as children. This serious risk factor is found in Texas, where more than 30 percent of children in grades 4 through 11 are overweight or obese. A child who is overweight at age 12 has a 75-percent chance of being overweight as an adult.

 

There is no single solution to preventing or addressing obesity. Multiple evidence-based approaches must be pursued for physicians, communities, schools, and workplaces, and each must identify potential barriers to implementing local programs.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Texas Medical Association
Scoop.it!

AAP: All Work and No Play Bad for Kids

Recess during school offers children cognitive, social, emotional, and physical benefits they don't get through academics alone, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Texas Medical Association's insight:

Invest in obesity control

 

Overweight and obesity contribute to diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, cancer, and stroke. Texas has an easy-to-see obesity crisis. Some 66 percent of Texas adults are overweight or obese; the United States average is 63 percent. During the past three decades, obesity rates in children have more than tripled in the country. Today, 32 percent of Texas children (ages 10-17) are obese.

 

The obesity epidemic, and the ever-younger age groups that it strikes, threatens Texas’ physical and fiscal health. Texas’ continually expanding waistline correlates to our health care cost demands. Obesity is responsible for 27 percent of the growth in health care spending. Treating obese patients costs 37 percent more than treating normal-weight patients.

 

The rise in overweight and obesity is affecting the bottom line of Texas employers. The Texas Comptroller’s Office found that in 2009, obesity cost Texas businesses an estimated $9.5 billion, due to higher employee insurance costs, absenteeism, and other effects. Left unchecked, obesity could cost employers $32.5 billion annually by 2030.

 

Improved physical health in students has been linked to academic success. Conversely, children with obesity are more prone to absences and lower grades. In the United States, students who are physically active at least 60 minutes on most days, play on at least one sports team, or watch fewer than three hours of television per day consistently have “mostly A’s.”

 

A great proportion of obese adults were overweight or obese as children. This serious risk factor is found in Texas, where more than 30 percent of children in grades 4 through 11 are overweight or obese. A child who is overweight at age 12 has a 75-percent chance of being overweight as an adult.

 

There is no single solution to preventing or addressing obesity. Multiple evidence-based approaches must be pursued for physicians, communities, schools, and workplaces, and each must identify potential barriers to implementing local programs.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Texas Medical Association
Scoop.it!

F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America's Future 2012 - Trust for America's Health

The number of obese adults, along with related disease rates and health care costs, are on course to increase dramatically in every state in the country over the next 20 years, according to F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America's Future 2012, a report released by Trust for America's Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). 

 

“This study shows us two futures for America’s health,” said Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, RWJF president and CEO. “At every level of government, we must pursue policies that preserve health, prevent disease and reduce health care costs. Nothing less is acceptable.”

 

For Texas, report estimates adult obesity rate could reach 57.2 percent by 2030. Related health care costs could climb by 17.4 percent.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Texas Medical Association
Scoop.it!

In U.S., Majority Overweight or Obese in All 50 States

In U.S., Majority Overweight or Obese in All 50 States | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it

A majority of American adults in all 50 states are either overweight or obese in 2012. West Virginia residents are the most likely to fall into one of these weight groups (69.3%), while Coloradans are least likely (55.1%).

 

The rise in overweight and obesity is affecting the bottom line of Texas employers. The Texas Comptroller’s Office found that in 2009, obesity cost Texas businesses an estimated $9.5 billion, due to higher employee insurance costs, absenteeism, and other effects. Left unchecked, obesity could cost employers $32.5 billion annually by 2030.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Texas Medical Association
Scoop.it!

Doctors Should Screen All Adults for Obesity, U.S. Panel Says | Healthland | TIME.com

Doctors Should Screen All Adults for Obesity, U.S. Panel Says | Healthland | TIME.com | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it

With more American adults qualifying as obese than ever before, doctors should be screening all adult patients for unhealthy weight, says a government panel.

 

The obesity epidemic, and the ever-younger age groups that it strikes, threatens Texas’ physical and fiscal health. Texas’ continually expanding waistline correlates to our health care cost demands. Obesity is responsible for 27 percent of the growth in health care spending. Treating obese patients costs 37 percent more than treating normal-weight patients

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Texas Medical Association
Scoop.it!

Are Obese Employees Killing Your Company? [INFOGRAPHIC]

Are Obese Employees Killing Your Company? [INFOGRAPHIC] | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it

Obese employees cost American companies a lot of money. This infographic breaks down how, and offers some prevention tips.

 

The leading causes of death and disability in Texas and the United States today are preventable because they are closely associated with personal lifestyle decisions. Texans’ personal behaviors contribute to more than 60 percent of all deaths in our state every year The leading causes of death and disability in Texas and the United States today are preventable because they are closely associated with personal lifestyle decisions. Texans’ personal behaviors contribute to more than 60 percent of all deaths in our state every year 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Texas Medical Association
Scoop.it!

The ABCs of Beating Obesity

The ABCs of Beating Obesity | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it

Obesity is so entrenched in the U.S. that it will take an intense push by schools, employers, doctors and others to reverse an epidemic that accounts for billions of dollars in annual health-care costs.

 

Among our recommendations:

- Increase funding for improving access to healthy foods; increase access to parks and recreational facilities; and promote worksite wellness policies.

- Improve the health of Texas students by increasing physical activity and reducing barriers to student participation in safe school sport activities. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Texas Medical Association
Scoop.it!

How Washington went soft on childhood obesity

How Washington went soft on childhood obesity | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it
Washington, D.C.(Reuters) - In the political arena, one side is winning the war on child obesity.The side with the fattest wallets.After aggressive lobbying, Congress declared pizza a vegetable to protect...

Obesity is costing America billions of dollars and thousands of lives. We need to rally around solutions, not fight them.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Texas Medical Association
Scoop.it!

Obesity's death toll could be higher than believed, study says

Obesity's death toll could be higher than believed, study says | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it
The death toll of the nation's obesity epidemic may be close to four times higher than has been widely believed, and all that excess weight could reverse the steady trend of lengthening life spans for a generation of younger Americans, new...
Texas Medical Association's insight:

Invest in obesity control

 

Overweight and obesity contribute to diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, cancer, and stroke. Texas has an easy-to-see obesity crisis. Some 66 percent of Texas adults are overweight or obese; the United States average is 63 percent. During the past three decades, obesity rates in children have more than tripled in the country. Today, 32 percent of Texas children (ages 10-17) are obese.

 

The obesity epidemic, and the ever-younger age groups that it strikes, threatens Texas’ physical and fiscal health. Texas’ continually expanding waistline correlates to our health care cost demands. Obesity is responsible for 27 percent of the growth in health care spending. Treating obese patients costs 37 percent more than treating normal-weight patients.

 

The rise in overweight and obesity is affecting the bottom line of Texas employers. The Texas Comptroller’s Office found that in 2009, obesity cost Texas businesses an estimated $9.5 billion, due to higher employee insurance costs, absenteeism, and other effects. Left unchecked, obesity could cost employers $32.5 billion annually by 2030.

 

Improved physical health in students has been linked to academic success. Conversely, children with obesity are more prone to absences and lower grades. In the United States, students who are physically active at least 60 minutes on most days, play on at least one sports team, or watch fewer than three hours of television per day consistently have “mostly A’s.”

 

A great proportion of obese adults were overweight or obese as children. This serious risk factor is found in Texas, where more than 30 percent of children in grades 4 through 11 are overweight or obese. A child who is overweight at age 12 has a 75-percent chance of being overweight as an adult.

 

There is no single solution to preventing or addressing obesity. Multiple evidence-based approaches must be pursued for physicians, communities, schools, and workplaces, and each must identify potential barriers to implementing local programs

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Texas Medical Association
Scoop.it!

Obesity causing health care costs to rise, study finds | Business | NewsObserver.com

Obesity causing health care costs to rise, study finds | Business | NewsObserver.com | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it
Whether you're obese or not, obesity increases Americans' health expenditures by $1,723 a year per person.
Texas Medical Association's insight:

Invest in obesity control

 

Overweight and obesity contribute to diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, cancer, and stroke. Texas has an easy-to-see obesity crisis. Some 66 percent of Texas adults are overweight or obese; the United States average is 63 percent. During the past three decades, obesity rates in children have more than tripled in the country. Today, 32 percent of Texas children (ages 10-17) are obese.

 

The obesity epidemic, and the ever-younger age groups that it strikes, threatens Texas’ physical and fiscal health. Texas’ continually expanding waistline correlates to our health care cost demands. Obesity is responsible for 27 percent of the growth in health care spending. Treating obese patients costs 37 percent more than treating normal-weight patients.

 

The rise in overweight and obesity is affecting the bottom line of Texas employers. The Texas Comptroller’s Office found that in 2009, obesity cost Texas businesses an estimated $9.5 billion, due to higher employee insurance costs, absenteeism, and other effects. Left unchecked, obesity could cost employers $32.5 billion annually by 2030.

 

Improved physical health in students has been linked to academic success. Conversely, children with obesity are more prone to absences and lower grades. In the United States, students who are physically active at least 60 minutes on most days, play on at least one sports team, or watch fewer than three hours of television per day consistently have “mostly A’s.”

 

A great proportion of obese adults were overweight or obese as children. This serious risk factor is found in Texas, where more than 30 percent of children in grades 4 through 11 are overweight or obese. A child who is overweight at age 12 has a 75-percent chance of being overweight as an adult.

 

There is no single solution to preventing or addressing obesity. Multiple evidence-based approaches must be pursued for physicians, communities, schools, and workplaces, and each must identify potential barriers to implementing local programs.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Texas Medical Association
Scoop.it!

In U.S., Obesity Up in Nearly All Age Groups Since 2008

In U.S., Obesity Up in Nearly All Age Groups Since 2008 | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it

Nearly every age group in America today is more likely to be obese than the same age groups were four years ago. Obesity is up the most among older adults -- 14.4% of those aged 84 to 87 years are obese today, up from 12.2% in 2008.

 

TMA Says:

Increase funding for improving access to healthy foods; increase access to parks and recreational facilities; and promote worksite wellness policies. Improve the health of Texas students by increasing physical activity and reducing barriers to student participation in safe school sport activities.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Texas Medical Association
Scoop.it!

Interactive: Healthy Food Scarcity

Interactive: Healthy Food Scarcity | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it

This map shows the percentage of food retailers that offer healthy options by census tract, as calculated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2011. To give a sense of the poverty level in the area, the CDC’s data is combined with estimates from the American Community Survey to show how many households received benefits from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program or were below the poverty line but did not receive SNAP benefits in 2010.

 

TMA supports increased funding for improved access to health foods.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Texas Medical Association
Scoop.it!

Issue Brief: Analysis of Obesity Rates by State - Trust for America's Health

Issue Brief: Analysis of Obesity Rates by State - Trust for America's Health | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it

Report: Texas is one of 12 states with obesity rates of 30 percent or more.

 

The obesity epidemic, and the ever-younger age groups that it strikes, threatens Texas’ physical and fiscal health. Texas’ continually expanding waistline correlates to our health care cost demands. Obesity is responsible for 27 percent of the growth in health care spending. Treating obese patients costs 37 percent more than treating normal-weight patients.

 

The rise in overweight and obesity is affecting the bottom line of Texas employers. The Texas Comptroller’s Office found that in 2009, obesity cost Texas businesses an estimated $9.5 billion, due to higher employee insurance costs, absenteeism, and other effects. Left unchecked, obesity could cost employers $32.5 billion annually by 2030.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Texas Medical Association
Scoop.it!

Lots to Lose: How America's Health and Obesity Crisis Threatens our Economic Future | Bipartisan Policy Center

Lots to Lose: How America's Health and Obesity Crisis Threatens our Economic Future | Bipartisan Policy Center | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it

"Our nation is in the midst of a public health crisis so profound that is it undermining our national well-being, our economic competitiveness and even our long-term national security."

 

TMA's Healthy Vision 2020 recommendations:

Increase funding for improving access to healthy foods; increase access to parks and recreational facilities; and promote worksite wellness policies. Improve the health of Texas students by increasing physical activity and reducing barriers to student participation in safe school sport activities.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Texas Medical Association
Scoop.it!

Me and My Doctor: Fighting the Obesity Epidemic

Me and My Doctor: Fighting the Obesity Epidemic | Healthy Vision 2020 | Scoop.it

Physician leader Kimberly Avila Edwards, MD, discusses strategies physicians are implementing to help tackle Texas' obesity problem, from the individual patient to the community; now and into the future.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Texas Medical Association
Scoop.it!

As America's waistline expands, costs soar

* $190 billion a year in excess medical spending* Many costs borne by non-obese, as in higher insurancepremiums* Anti-obesity campaigners say highlighting costs should spur policy changes?

Here's an amazing stat: that extra $190 billion a year is about 20 percent of health care spending. One analyst says these costs, passed along to taxpayers and non-obese health insurance customers, amount to the "second-hand smoke of obesity."
more...
No comment yet.