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9 Psychology Tips to Get Prospects to Trust You Faster

9 Psychology Tips to Get Prospects to Trust You Faster | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it
These tips will help you earn your prospects' faith in record time. Trust me.
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VanillaSoft's curator insight, June 2, 2015 9:45 AM

Emma Snider touches on 9 Psychology tips on how you can get your prospects to put their trust in you faster.  There are some good tips in the article that will help you improve your sales process with your prospects.  Sometimes we get so caught up in just wanting to make a sale that we lose sight of how to make the sale.


Take a look at this article and see what tips she offers that can help your salespeople be better at gaining the trust of their prospects.  There are lead management software tools, like VanillaSoft, that can help your sales team stay on track with some of these tips.  Don't miss out on opportunities because your sales team isn't properly prepared to build trust with your prospects.


Check out VanillaSoft's lead management software features.

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Maximize your Training Outcome -Training Magazine Middle East Q3 2015

Maximize your Training Outcome -Training Magazine Middle East Q3 2015 | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it
Cover Feature: Negotiating Across Cultures, Thought Leader Interview with Daniel Pink, Company Spotlight: Authenticity Coaching and Consulting, Case Study: Employee Value Proposition and much more...

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Madjid Messaad's curator insight, June 17, 2015 4:05 PM

How to Ensure the Best Training Outcome of your session !

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Make Money Building Websites - Home Based Business Opportunity

Make Money Building Websites - Home Based Business Opportunity | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it
Home Based Business Opportunity

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What do patients want?

What do patients want? | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it
KEY TAKEAWAY: There are two things that today’s patients’ want in health care; empathy and to be heard.  Pharma has to find a way to take a more empathetic approach to DTC marketing if we want our efforts to be effective.

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Self-powered cardiac pacemaker a breakthrough for researchers

Self-powered cardiac pacemaker a breakthrough for researchers | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it
In a move that could draw attention from the world's top cardiac devicemakers, researchers in Korea have developed a self-powered artificial cardiac pacemaker that operates without battery power.

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5 Ways to Boost Happiness Naturally without Antidepressants ("be social, eat healthy & be physically fit")

5 Ways to Boost Happiness Naturally without Antidepressants ("be social, eat healthy & be physically fit") | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it
Depression does not require antidepressants! Here are 5 things people can do to boost their happiness levels without ever popping a pharmaceutical pill.

1. The Easiest Way to Feel Better, by Far, is to Exercise. In study after study, scientists have proven that just moving your body makes you feel better. Exercise boosts dopamine levels and oxytocin levels – two hormones responsible for happiness and love; one dampens pain, the other makes you feel ‘bliss.’

 

2. Spend Time with Friends and Family - Spending time with friends and family or even interacting with social media friends across cyber space can boost levels of seratonin and oxytocin, and even help you to live longer.

 

3. Get Outside - The Science of Nature’s Influence on Your Health, Happiness and Vitality, believes that the energy from mountains, trees, plants and water can improve your sleep and mental outlook. 

 

4. Sleep More - Our circadian rhythms are absolutely vital to good mental health. 

 

5. Improve Your Diet - Foods for depression can be much more effective than a bottle of junk made by Big Pharma. ... Try leafy greens, nuts, and foods high in Omega 3s to get an immediate happiness boost.


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Bert Guevara's curator insight, April 9, 2015 6:07 AM

If you are caught in the TRAP of urban life and can't find the happiness you are looking for, it is not too late to pause, pray and reflect; get counseling; take the NEW WAY. Don't rely on pills; they won't be enough.

"This pill-popping became the norm, even though clinical studies suggest there are numerous natural remedies that can help us feel better, without the pricey and life altering side-effects that many of these drugs can cause.

"Indeed, many individuals can find relief from depression with simple lifestyle changes, even just dietary changes. Even the spice turmeric has been shown to treat depression better than Prozac, one of the best selling, yet least effective anti-depressants of all time."

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No Association Between Salt And Blood Pressure, Study Finds

No Association Between Salt And Blood Pressure, Study Finds | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it
Sodium has long been labeled the blood-pressure bogeyman. But are we giving salt a fair shake? A new study published in the American Journal of…

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Is it a virus or a bacteria? New test may help curb unnecessary antibiotic prescription

Is it a virus or a bacteria? New test may help curb unnecessary antibiotic prescription | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it
A team of Israeli researchers have developed a test that can distinguish whether an infection stems a virus or a bacteria – a simple but potentially impactful screener that could cut down unnecessary use of antibiotics.

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How much sugar is in your food?

How much sugar is in your food? | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it
Discover the surprising amounts of sugar found in the everyday food and drink that you're consuming. Consuming sugar in excess can have big health consequences.

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Doctors and social media: It's time to embrace change

Doctors and social media: It's time to embrace change | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it

 

I recently took on a position of medical journal editor. It is with the Journal of Kentucky Medical Association.

It’s been a good learning experience. Part of the job of editorial board members is to write an opinion column. (Check, I’ve done that before.) What follows below was published in this month’s journal.

The editorial board put no restrictions on me. So I decided to write about social media and why it is time that doctors make the leap from analog to digital. (It breaks the less than 500 words rule.)

The Greek philosopher Heraclitus gets credit for the idea that change is central to the universe. Physicians know this doctrine well. For us, in the practice of medicine, change is a constant. And in recent years, a major vehicle for change is the Internet and social media. Facebook boasts more than a billion users, Twitter more than 120 million, and up to 80% of patients go online for health information. Google yourself and you will discover your digital footprint—whether you like it or not.

Social media expert Dr. Bryan Vartebedian (Texas Children’s Hospital/Baylor College of Medicine) writes that there are two realities of online reputation management: 1) you have no control over what people say; and 2) you have 100% control of the story you create. Yet doctors have been slow to embrace social media. That’s not surprising; we are hardwired to be risk-averse.

It’s true; engaging with social media brings risk. That which is digital is permanent—a sobering reality for sure.

But I ask: What medical intervention, what shot at making things better, comes free of risk? A rule of doctoring is that to do good a doctor must risk doing harm. A distinguished heart surgeon once consoled me—after I had caused a procedural complication—that if I didn’t want complications, I shouldn’t do anything.

It’s the same with engaging in social media. In the hyper-connected world of 2014, medical professionals have reached a fork in the road. One path is a road well traveled. On this familiar route, we continue to keep our heads down, stay in the weeds, out of trouble. Don’t wiggle; don’t rock the boat; check the boxes; fill out the forms and accept what comes. Don’t dare engage in the online conversation. Choosing this path is like not treating a disease: less ownership confers less personal risk.

The purpose of what follows is to encourage you to consider the other path: the path of engaging in the online conversation and using the tools of social media to enhance the good that can be done—for patients, for ourselves, and for the profession at large.

As a multi-year participant in social media, I see more benefit and opportunity than risk. Here are five factors to consider while pausing at that fork in the road.

First, consider the blank-slate status of the playing field for health care social media. Beyond common sense and decency, there are few rules. Digital natives—like me, and perhaps you—will make the rules. Pause for a moment here and consider that idea: making rules rather than following them. Sounds good, doesn’t it?

Second, as a doctor, you are different. People will listen to you; your voice matters. Currently the Internet overwhelms people with information but, too often, the details come in the form of highly edited groupspeak from medical societies, or pseudo-science from people selling things, or anecdotes from patient forums. What patients really want to read is what their doctor says. How does John Mandrola feel about anticoagulation; what does James Patrick Murphy say about opioid addiction, and how does Kathy Nieder feel about electronic medical records?

Third, social media can be therapeutic. It’s an understatement to say morale amongst caregivers is low, and sinking lower. The primary reason for this, I believe, is that joy is being debrided from our job. It’s as if joy is extra; there’s not time for it anymore. Bulleted HPIs and 10-pt review of systems replace the beautiful stories; white screens inhibit human-human connections; and appropriate use criteria supersede the pleasure of using clinical judgment. Social media offers an elixir, a chance to reflect about what is still so good about our work. When you write, or Tweet, or blog, or create videos, you are forced to dwell on the patient who actually lost the weight, the pacing lead that found the perfect branch of the coronary sinus, or the family who sent you a Thank You note for having had the courage to discuss end-of-life care. What’s more, the social aspect of social media connects you with colleagues across the world, not just your hospital’s doctors’ lounge. I regularly connect with colleagues in Germany, Australia, and the UK. This is nice.

Fourth, social media can make you a better doctor. The pace of change in health care is increasing. Look no farther than the new cholesterol and hypertension guidelines. In the course of three weeks in late 2013, two ensconced paradigms of cardiovascular medicine were upended. Social media covered the story in real time; print journal coverage came later. Another example: one of my favorite types of sessions at medical meetings is the pro/con debate. Social media brings these lively discussions to your smartphone or tablet. (In fact, as a participant in social media, you could be a debater.) The challenge for physicians of the past was having enough to do for patients. The challenge for today’s caregiver is about managing the expanding menu of options. Staying current and informed has never been more important. The micro-blogging platform Twitter allows easy curation of content from trusted sources as it comes available. Another aspect of creating content is the depth of knowledge it requires. In this way, I have no doubt that participating in social media has made me a more informed clinician.

Finally, the democracy of social media levels the playing field of influence–for patients, doctors and even journalists. The blog and Twitter feed of stage IV breast cancer patient Lisa Adams has stirred the mainstream of journalism and medicine. When writers Bill and Emma Keller (of the NY Times and the Guardian, respectively) weighed-in on Ms. Adams poignant posts, a torrent of criticism and conversation followed. The vastness of the response (from the New Yorker, Wired, NPR, Atlantic, The Nation, the American College of Oncology and many more outlets) removed any doubt that social media has transformed the sphere of influence.

I recently presented at an Indiana University Medical Student Council Leadership conference. One of the other speakers, Dr. Richard Gunderman, a radiology professor and author, told attendees about the importance of narrative. “If you can tell a story, you are a leader. Stories are powerful. Medicine is story-penic.” He went further, speaking a truth well known to today’s clinicians: “there are things in medicine that need to be said. But it takes courage to speak candidly…. If you are courageous, you are a leader.”

My recent experience provides proof of this concept. Although I am an academic nobody, at the 2013 Heart Rhythm Society Sessions I shared a stage with three other distinguished leaders in the field. Why? Dr. Rich Fogel, the president of HRS said this when I posed the why me question to him: “John, you say things we need to hear.” Social media gives regular doctors a voice, a chance to influence.

Perchance I have piqued your interest in social media, that the benefits outweigh the risks, the peril of not engaging greater than engaging. If so, I invite you to read my Ten Simple Rules for doctors on social media and follow me on Twitter at @DrJohnM.



Read more: http://medcitynews.com/2014/02/doctors-social-media-time-embrace-change/#ixzz2usggM6fQ


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Ces aliments qui contiennent plus de fer que la viande rouge

Ces aliments qui contiennent plus de fer que la viande rouge | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it
"Vous avez une petite carence en fer, pensez à manger de la viande rouge" , nombreux sont ...

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Brain cancer symptoms that affect health

Brain cancer symptoms that affect health | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it

Symptoms of brain cancer depend on several factors, including the tumor type, size, location and extent, as well as age, health history and more.


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5 Healthy Habits That Will Actually Change Your Life

5 Healthy Habits That Will Actually Change Your Life | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it

 

Why do most people fail to stick to something challenging, like losing weight or getting in better shape? They don't start small. They immediately go all in. They change everything, which pretty soon results in not changing anything.

Here's a better approach. Don't immediately go all in. Don't waste your time adopting the latest trendy diet or the current fitness fad. No matter how incredible the program, go all in and you're incredibly unlikely to stick with it.

Instead, just start with making a few simple changes to your day. You'll lose a little weight, feel a little better, and then find it a lot easier to incorporate a few more healthy habits into your routine.

So for now just make these five changes:


1. Drink a glass of water before every meal.

Everyone needs to drink more water. That's a given. Plus when you drink a glass of water before you eat you'll already feel a little more full and won't be as tempted to eat past the point of hunger.


2. Eat one really healthy meal.

Pick one meal. Just one. Then change what you eat. If it's lunch, eat one portion of protein that fits in the palm of your hand, a vegetable or fruit, and four or five almonds.


I know that's not a lot of food, but it's healthier than what you're eating now and, just as important, it lets you take small steps toward better controlling your portions at every meal.

 

3. Use your lunch to be active.

It doesn't take 30 minutes or an hour to eat. So make your lunch break productive. Go for a walk. (Better yet, find a walking buddy or do like LinkedIn's Jeff Weiner and have walking meetings.) Or stretch. Or do some push-ups or sit-ups.


4. Eat one meal-replacement bar.

OK, so most protein bars taste like flavored sawdust. But most are also nutritious and low in calories, and they make it easy to stave off the midafternoon hunger pangs you'll inevitably feel after having eaten, say, a light lunch.


Eating a midmorning or midafternoon meal replacement bar doesn't just bridge the gap between meals; it's an easy way to get in the habit of eating smaller meals more frequently, another habit you'll eventually want to adopt.


5. Have fun completing a physical challenge.

It would be great if you could consistently hit the gym four to five days a week, but if you're starting from zero instantly transforming yourself into a gym rat isn't realistic.

Instead, once a week pick something challenging to do. Take a really long walk. Take a long bike ride. Take a testing hike.

Just make sure you pick an accomplishment, not a yardstick. Don't decide to walk six miles on a treadmill; that's a yardstick. Walk the six miles to a friend's house. Don't ride 20 miles on an exercise bike; ride to a café, grab a snack, and then ride back home.

 


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Trust Leads to Sales… But What Leads to Trust?

Trust Leads to Sales… But What Leads to Trust? | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it
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VanillaSoft's curator insight, June 9, 2015 10:55 AM

Deb Calvert talks about the importance of trust in the sales cycle.  Trust is an important aspect of any type of relationship and the sales process is no exception.  She talks about the 12 dimensions of trust and how they play a pivotal part in building relationships with potential prospects.


A few of the trust dimensions stuck out to me, which I've listed below.  If your sales team uses lead management software like VanillaSoft, then it can aid in the trust building process.  


Consistency - Logical branch scripting will help your sales team be consistent with the messaging of the company.  It's important to make sure everyone is conveying the same message.


Decision Making - Email drip campaigns can help put important information in the hands of your potential buyers to help them in the decision making process.


Follow-Through - Appointment setting features will keep your sales team on track and make sure appointments are followed through with prospects.


Investing in lead management software is a great way to help keep your sales team focused and building up trust with potential customers.  Check out VanillaSoft's free trial!

Jane Anderson's curator insight, June 15, 2015 10:04 PM

Trust is so crucial as part of the sales process, love tip #4.

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Certain medications cause people to commit murder… homicide risk increased by 31% to 200%... 100 million Americans take these drugs

(NaturalNews) Just as Natural News has warned for over a decade, mind-altering medications such as tranquilizers and psychiatric drugs (SSRIs) have now been confirmed to increased to risk of a person committing murder.A new study published in the...

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Do You Have A Healthy Relationship With Opportunity?

Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.”

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Don Dea's curator insight, May 28, 2015 12:36 AM

Opportunities also serve as the driving force that pushes organizations into pursuing new territory, in the hopes of discovering potential new markets for their products/services to boost stagnant or declining revenue shares.

It’s no doubt the reason why we find it so hard to say “No” to new opportunities because of the inherent belief that any opportunity which crosses our path is an open door leading us one step closer to our objectives.

Although we spend so much time talking about seeking opportunities, we rarely consider the importance or value of the quality of the opportunities we’re offered. That’s why most of us approach opportunities from the vantage point of “if we don’t accept it or if we pass this up, what will we lose?”

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Some 30 nations have dangerously weak health systems: WHO

Some 30 nations have dangerously weak health systems: WHO | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it

About 30 countries have health systems that are as dangerously weak as the ones that allowed Ebola to ravage Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, the World Health Organization warned Thursday.

 

The UN health agency stressed the urgency of learning the lessons drawn from the outbreak that has killed more than 11,100 people in west Africa, calling for strengthening health systems so they can rapidly detect and counter looming disasters.

 

"We must reverse the trend in global health where we wait for the fire to flare up, run to put it out but then forget to fireproof the building," said senior WHO official Ruediger Krech.

 

The world, he told reporters, had to create a health system "built to withstand shocks whether from an outbreak like Ebola, a natural disaster or a financial crisis."

 

The fragile health systems in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Libera, weakened by conflict and poverty, were an important factor in Ebola's rapid spread through the three countries last year.

 

And Krech said at least 28 other countries worldwide, mainly in Africa, but also in Asia and Latin America, had similarly weak systems.

 

The list includes Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar, Burundi, Sudan, Afghanistan and Haiti.

 

"So our work will not be limited to west Africa," he said.

The Ebola outbreak began in late 2013 in Guinea, but was permitted to spread silently for three months before the WHO and the region raised the alarm.

 

The crisis sparked a global health scare, with the humanitarian response especially gaining momentum once stray cases were detected in the United States and some European countries.

Liberia, once the worst-hit country, was declared Ebola-free on May 9. But Krech said the crisis was far from over in the two neighbouring countries and refused to give a timeframe for them to acquire a similar status.

 

On Wednesday, the WHO's annual decision-making assembly approved a significant hike in its budget for 2016-17 to among other things help strengthen health systems in west Africa and elsewhere.

Just pouring in money will not fix the problem, Krech warned, adding that "corruption is rife in many countries."

 

"The elephant in the room" in many nations with poor health systems is endemic corruption and a lack of transparency of how funds are spent in key sectors such as health, he told AFP.

"To further complicate things, the private health sector in many countries in unregulated," he said.

 


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No Association Between Salt And Blood Pressure, Study Finds

No Association Between Salt And Blood Pressure, Study Finds | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it
Sodium has long been labeled the blood-pressure bogeyman. But are we giving salt a fair shake? A new study published in the American Journal of…

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AstraZeneca - Non-adherence to cardiovascular medicine: Tackling the ‘global threat’

AstraZeneca - Non-adherence to cardiovascular medicine: Tackling the ‘global threat’ | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it

Non-adherence is when a patient does not take their medication as frequently as prescribed or for the period of time recommended by their physician.2

The clinical implications are clear, with poor adherence to CV therapy increasing so does the risk of poorer patient outcomes and death.2Risks relating to non-adherence have been reported in many studies and remain an ongoing challenge for treating physicians as well as patients around the world.


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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, March 18, 2015 6:29 AM

Astra Zeneca

 

Associated risks

Non-adherence to cardiovascular therapy is associated with increased mortality. A recent study has shown that patients who stop taking their medication experienced a five-fold increase in the number of deaths versus those who remained adherent,2reinforcing the importance of tackling the non-adherence pandemic.

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Not all GMO plants are created equally: it's the trait, not the method, that's important

Not all GMO plants are created equally: it's the trait, not the method, that's important | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it
People have been changing plant genomes ever since agriculture got started thousands of years ago. Here are the high-tech ways researchers insert new genes into plants now.

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La grosse arnaque de l’AMM d’un médicament

La grosse arnaque de l’AMM d’un médicament | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it

L’autorisation de mise sur le marché d’un médicament doit être rigoureuse

 

L’AMM d’un médicament, son efficacité, son prix et son remboursement sont soumis  à diverses commissions supposées indépendantes.

 
Cependant, une récente enquête de Mediapart à permis de découvrir que ce n’était pas du tout le cas. Mais bon, ce n’est pas un scoop, au BonCoinSanté nous dénonçons depuis plusieurs années tous les conflits d’intérêts liés au business du médicament. Voici donc les grandes lignes de cette enquête.

 

Qui décide qu’un médicament va être sur le marché ?

 

La commission de mise sur le marché du médicament, permet à un médicament d’être vendu sur le territoire français. Les avis rendus par cette fameuse commission sur les médicaments proposés par les labos ont deux gros impacts:
La sécurité sanitaire, avec tous les risques qu’ont connait, il suffi de se rappeler l’affaire du médiator, protelos ou autre champix…

Le prix du médicament, et donc le taux de remboursement par la Sécurité sociale, avec le risque d’augmenter son déficit…

 

Intérêts des labos

 

Pour les labos qui proposent un nouveau médicament sur le marché, vous comprendrez certainement que l’avis de cette commission va peser lourd, jusqu’à plusieurs centaines de millions d’euros pour un seul médoc. Nous ne parlerons pas d’efficacité car c’est vraiment la dernière chose qui va intervenir dans une AMM. Donc  si un médicament ne reçoit pas, ou peu de remboursement, il ne se vendra pas ou très peu. Il faudra donc que le nouveau médicament (efficace ou pas, dangereux ou pas…) reçoive cette fameuse autorisation avec un bon taux de remboursement, tous ceci afin de contribuer à la bonne santé financière du fameux labo qui fabrique le médicament.

 

Comment fonctionne le système ?...Lire la suite sur: http://www.bon-coin-sante.com/blog-sante-sans-prise-de-tete/actualites-sante/grosse-arnaque-amm-medicament/


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Bressuire Pratique's curator insight, May 16, 2015 1:18 PM

L’Autorisation de Mise sur le Marché (AMM) d’un médicament, son efficacité, son prix et son remboursement sont soumis  à diverses commissions supposées indépendantes. Indépendantes et sans intérêts financiers derrière vous êtes certains...!  De toute façon ce n'est pas grave puisque c'est nous, via la sécurité sociale, qui payons tout ça !!!!

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No Association Between Salt And Blood Pressure, Study Finds

No Association Between Salt And Blood Pressure, Study Finds | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it
Sodium has long been labeled the blood-pressure bogeyman. But are we giving salt a fair shake? A new study published in the American Journal of…

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Man with two hearts survives double-sized attack

Man with two hearts survives double-sized attack | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it
Doctors shocked to discover that Italian man who sought medical treatment for cardiovascular distress has two hearts.

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11 Benefits of Lemon Water You Didn’t Know About

11 Benefits of Lemon Water You Didn’t Know About | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it
This simple combination boosts your health in so many ways! Here are 11 of them.

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Train Your Mind, Not Just Your Body

Train Your Mind, Not Just Your Body | Healthy Pharma Attitude | Scoop.it

As athletes and fitness enthusiasts, it's easy for us to get carried away and focus only on training our bodies. After all, these are what we primarily use when we play sports or exercise. However, in doing so, we often neglect one part essential to our progress and performance: our minds.

 

It may not seem obvious, but our minds play crucial roles in how well we do and how far we go in sports and fitness. They can be the difference between a bad performance and a good one, or between a good one and a great one. They can either slow down our progress (even bring us back!) or they can speed us along faster than we ever imagined. Our minds are powerful tools, perhaps the most powerful one that we have. Unfortunately, we often forget this and fail to use our minds to their full potential.

 


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