Organic Farming
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Start a Community Seed Project

Start a Community Seed Project | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Across the country, people are reclaiming seed as a public resource for local food and gardening communities. We encourage you to start your own community seed project, and keep this amazing momentum growing. Our Community Seed Toolkit resources are free, adaptable, informative, and meant to be shared, just like seed. Whether you are a beginner…

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Organic Farming
There are many options out there to raising healthy food. Let's take a closer look.
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Ethiopian farmers need urgent assistance to feed country caught in major drought

Ethiopian farmers need urgent assistance to feed country caught in major drought | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Timely agricultural assistance for the upcoming rainy season is essential to help the drought-affected people of Ethiopia, as one of the strongest El Niño events on record continues to have devastating effects on the lives and livelihoods of farmers and herders.

Via CIMMYT, Int.
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Ethiopians in major drought.
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How To Make Healthy Choices As We Age

How To Make Healthy Choices As We Age | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
This  post has been  contributed by Laura.

Via Ingrid Long
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Healthy?
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How Fast Food Messes With Your Hormones ("prefer home-cooked meals vs home delivered fast food")

How Fast Food Messes With Your Hormones ("prefer home-cooked meals vs home delivered fast food") | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

A new study shows people who eat fast food have higher levels of plastics chemicals, called phthalates, in their system

If you want to eat healthy, you’ll need to forgo fast food, which is high in sodium, sugar and grease. A new study supplies even more incentive to do so by finding that fast food is a source of chemicals called phthalates, which have been linked to a list of possible health burdens like hormone disruption and lower sperm count. 

The new report, published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, found that people who ate more fast food also had higher levels of two substances that occur when phthalates—which make plastic more flexible—break down in the body. “The same range of concentrations measured in this [group] overlaps with the range of concentrations that have been measured in some of epidemiological studies that find adverse health effects,” says study author Ami Zota, an assistant professor of environmental and occupational health at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health.

Prior studies have shown that diet is a source of exposure for plastics chemicals like phthalates and Bisphenol A (BPA), and that processed food may be of particular concern. The new study is the largest to look at exposure from fast food fare specifically.


Via Bert Guevara
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Fast food vs hormones?
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, June 21, 10:06 PM
It is always healthier to eat home-cooked meals. Do away with frequent "home deliveries" from fast-food chains; prepare your meals.

"If you want to eat healthy, you’ll need to forgo fast food, which is high in sodium, sugar and grease. A new study supplies even more incentive to do so by finding that fast food is a source of chemicals called phthalates, which have been linked to a list of possible health burdens like hormone disruption and lower sperm count."
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News

News | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
MAD Scientist Associates shares news updates regarding wetland, stream, and
ecological projects.  Community volunteer projects are highlighted as well
as awards and achievements.  Check here often for updated news items!

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MAD Scientists?
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Ohio Wetlands Association's curator insight, May 27, 6:46 AM
How do you celebrate Wetlands Month?
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2014: A Banner Year for Legalization of Pot? | RealClearPolitics

2014: A Banner Year for Legalization of Pot? | RealClearPolitics | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
2014: A Banner Year for Legalization of Pot?
#colorado #marijuana #legislation #aida #pot #weed
http://t.co/gH1juMETeK

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Medicinal marijuana.
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How To Make A Vertical Wind Generator From A Washing Machine Motor

How To Make A Vertical Wind Generator From A Washing Machine Motor | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Just came across this great step-by-step instructable showing you how to make a vertical wind generator from a washing machine motor.

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Your own wind generator.
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Below-ground plant–fungus network topology is not congruent with above-ground plant–animal network topology

Below-ground plant–fungus network topology is not congruent with above-ground plant–animal network topology | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

In nature, plants and their pollinating and/or seed-dispersing animals form complex interaction networks. The commonly observed pattern of links between specialists and generalists in these networks has been predicted to promote species coexistence. Plants also build highly species-rich mutualistic networks below ground with root-associated fungi, and the structure of these plant–fungus networks may also affect terrestrial community processes. By compiling high-throughput DNA sequencing data sets of the symbiosis of plants and their root-associated fungi from three localities along a latitudinal gradient, we uncovered the entire network architecture of these interactions under contrasting environmental conditions. Each network included more than 30 plant species and hundreds of mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi belonging to diverse phylogenetic groups. The results were consistent with the notion that processes shaping host-plant specialization of fungal species generate a unique linkage pattern that strongly contrasts with the pattern of above-ground plant–partner networks. Specifically, plant–fungus networks lacked a “nested” architecture, which has been considered to promote species coexistence in plant–partner networks. Rather, the below-ground networks had a conspicuous “antinested” topology. Our findings lead to the working hypothesis that terrestrial plant community dynamics are likely determined by the balance between above-ground and below-ground webs of interspecific interactions.


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Mycorrhizal patterns are very complex.
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Whats on in Brighton | Wake up to Organic

Whats on in Brighton | Wake up to Organic | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Helping Brighton Wake up to Organic, one free breakfast at a time. Most of the city’s wholefood stores and organic cafes are taking part by offering free organic mini-breakfasts on the morning of Wednesday June 15th 2016.

Via Soil Association
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Going organic?
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Ants move indoors across Chicago area after soggy spring

Ants move indoors across Chicago area after soggy spring | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Ants move indoors across Chicago area after soggy spring

Via Ron Wolford
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Ants moving indoors.
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Ron Wolford's curator insight, June 11, 10:58 PM
Chicago Tribune
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Failure to tackle soil will lead to ‘catastrophic’ breakdown 

Failure to tackle soil will lead to ‘catastrophic’ breakdown  | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Farmland soils must be better protected for future generations, a cross-party group of MPs and peers has warned. Current policies fail to reflect the impor

Via Soil Association
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Agricultural soils headed for serious problems.
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Cornell Garden-Based Learning Program | resources for gardeners & educators

Cornell Garden-Based Learning Program | resources for gardeners & educators | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Via Ron Wolford
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Cornell gardens?
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Vermeer CT1010tx compost turner

Vermeer elevating face compost turner.

Via Chad R. Steenhoek
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Vermeer compost turner?
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Chad R. Steenhoek's curator insight, March 19, 2015 3:55 PM

Not the Unit we use, but a video of composting equipment is always cool.

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Organic fertilizers have many benefits to your crops

Organic fertilizers have many benefits to your crops | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Via Chad R. Steenhoek
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Organic fertilizers?
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Chad R. Steenhoek's curator insight, April 8, 2015 6:50 PM

Happy Roots is proud to provide you with compost

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Non-Native Diets Are on the Rise as Countries Increasingly Rely on Foreign Crops

Non-Native Diets Are on the Rise as Countries Increasingly Rely on Foreign Crops | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
A new study has found that the proportion of non-native food crops in diets and agricultural systems has been steadily increasing over the past 50 years.

Via CIMMYT, Int.
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Foreign crops?
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Fat is back! Shoppers opt for whole milk, Greek yogurt ("decrease diabetes, cardio disease, some cancers, etc.")

Fat is back! Shoppers opt for whole milk, Greek yogurt ("decrease diabetes, cardio disease, some cancers, etc.") | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Once taboo, full-fat milk can help consumers decrease risk of diabetes, heart disease, new studies find.

Once snubbed, whole-fat milk, yogurt and other dairy products are finding their way back into our refrigerators, thanks to a growing interest in "whole foods" diets and new evidence that full-fat dairy products can be good for us, experts say. 

The trend is showing up in milk sales, both nationally and in Des Moines, industry data show. Whole milk sales in Des Moines climbed 9.6 percent last year over 2014; nationally, they climbed 4.5 percent. 

At the same time, fat-free milk sales in Des Moines dropped 9.5 percent, and nationally, they shrank 12.3 percent, according to data provided by Dairy Management, a marketing group for the industry's 45,000 U.S. dairy farmers. 

Chicago analytics company IRI collects the data. Statewide sales information wasn't available.

"There is some research that's coming out that shows consumption of whole-fat dairy is decreasing risk of Type 2 diabetes, decreasing risk of cardiovascular disease, decreasing risk of certain kinds of cancer, and people who consume whole-fat dairy products are less obese,"

Researchers are exploring whether it's the "dairy itself or their eating pattern as a whole," Litchfield said. 

"People who consume dairy products also tend to have other healthy behaviors," she said. "They're less likely to be smokers, they're more likely to be active, and they're more likely to consume whole grains."


Via Bert Guevara
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Fat?
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, June 20, 2:37 AM
I stopped buying low-fat dairy products after I realized this and my health has improved.

"There is some research that's coming out that shows consumption of whole-fat dairy is decreasing risk of Type 2 diabetes, decreasing risk of cardiovascular disease, decreasing risk of certain kinds of cancer, and people who consume whole-fat dairy products are less obese,"
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Holy Guacamole! People In New Zealand Are Stealing Avocados ("low supply makes it very in-demand")

Holy Guacamole! People In New Zealand Are Stealing Avocados ("low supply makes it very in-demand") | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

As Sid Vicious once said, "You can't arrest me, I'm a guac-star." Or something like that.

In the interview, which can be heard below, Scoular elaborated on the cause of the problem: “In New Zealand, we don’t import avocados, and we’ve had a moderate supply of avocados in the last season and a big increase in demand.”

The going rate for the guacamole eggs is currently $4 to $6 New Zealand dollars ($2.80 to $4.20) each. That’s a pretty high price to pay for something you smush on toast, which explains the appeal of stealing them and selling them on the black market. 

New Zealand police are thinking the criminal — or criminals — are using the cloak of darkness to pluck avocados from trees. 

“They must have spent a few hours there taking fruit off the trees, loading them into his own car. We are not sure if he parked the car down the driveway or kept it on the side of the orchard,” Sergeant Aaron Fraser told Stuff.co.nz.

Despite all this madness, there is one thing thieves should know: The avocados they’re plucking aren’t ripe yet! 

The crops are immature this time of year, Fraser has said, and they aren’t expected to be ripe and ready until around September or October. Black market buyers: Beware of shoddy avocados! 

Our resident Kiwi in the office, who asked to remain anonymous, had this to say about avocados: “I enjoy them sometimes.”


Via Bert Guevara
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Avocado?
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, June 24, 12:56 AM
Have you discovered the nutritional benefits of this super-fruit yet? Don't be left behind because of the myths that its oil is bad for your health.
It is selling at $2.80 to $4.20 per piece (not per kilo) in New Zealand. In the Philippines, I just bought them for P60/kg in Silang (Cavite) and P120/kg from the supermarket. Some supermarkets are selling them at P199/kg.
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Black Swamp Conservancy - Local Land Named "MVW"

Black Swamp Conservancy - Local Land Named "MVW" | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Black Swamp Conservancy’s Forrest Woods Nature Preserve was recently named the Society of Wetland Scientists first ever Most Valuable Wetland as part of their "Wetland Treasure" program. The program features and highlights wetlands that exhibit exemplary function and service.

Via Ohio Wetlands Association
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Wetland Treasure?
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Ohio Wetlands Association's curator insight, June 15, 6:53 AM
The new 'Wetland Treasures' program is an inspiration.
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The Science of Phosphorus | Blog Series | 1 of 5

The Science of Phosphorus | Blog Series | 1 of 5 | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Nationwide, runoff from non-point sources is the largest source of nutrients, including N and P discharged to surface water. Although phosphorus is the 11th most abundant element in the earth’s crust, most natural phosphate compounds are very insoluble, and therefore, not quickly replenished. Therefore, plant available phosphorus is only a fraction of phosphorus in the soil. To make up for the difference between what is available and what is needed, more soluble forms are created for use in commercial fertilizers. Unfortunately, this same property makes them susceptible to runoff to surface waters through field tiles, storm sewers, and non-point sources.

Via YSI
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Phosphorus runoff?
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Carpenter Bee | Wood Destroying Insect | Entomology

Carpenter Bee | Wood Destroying Insect | Entomology | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Learn more about wood destroying insects like carpenter bee and pest management control from our entomology expert Stoney Bachman.

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Carpenter bee destruction.
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Would YOU eat insects to lose weight? This man says they're delicious

Would YOU eat insects to lose weight? This man says they're delicious | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Jason Brink, 29, from Thailand, claims crickets contain just 121 calories per 100 grams, compared to 567 calories in the same amount of peanuts.

Via HOTLIX®
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Edible insects?
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Rescooped by Eric Larson from All About Ants
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Pharaoh ants plague our kitchens in search of food

Pharaoh ants plague our kitchens in search of food | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Pharaoh ants (Monomorium pharonis Linn.) are, arguably, the most ubiquitous ant species in the world. They were first described in 1758 from specimens acquired in Egypt. From their location and their ability to make life miserable for us humans, they were thought to be one of the Biblical plagues set upon ancient Egypt.


Via Ron Wolford
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Pharaoh ants.
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Organic sector gets £50,000 boost after 25% decline

Organic sector gets £50,000 boost after 25% decline | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
A £50,000 development fund to give organic farming in Scotland a shot in the arm was launched yesterday – as official figures showed that the area of land devoted to organic production north of the Border had fallen to almost a quarter of its 2002 level.

Via Soil Association
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Money where their mouths are.
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SWOS gets help from community to build school garden in Cortez, Colorado

SWOS gets help from community to build school garden in Cortez, Colorado | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
SWOS gets help from community to build school garden

Via Ron Wolford
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SWOS builds garden?
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Life Lab: School Garden Lessons & Activities

Life Lab: School Garden Lessons & Activities | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Via Ron Wolford
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Not the first time for school gardens?
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Rescooped by Eric Larson from Happy Roots Compost News
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Organic gardening: it's not as hard as you may think

Organic gardening: it's not as hard as you may think | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Organic gardening is all about working with nature, not against nature. That's the message from Gayle Larson, a Master Gardener and certified professional horticulturalist, who lives in Kitsap County.
Via Chad R. Steenhoek
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Organic gardening easy?
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Chad R. Steenhoek's curator insight, March 18, 2015 11:21 AM
Keep working at it and the easier Organic growing will be for you.