Organic Farming
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Study suggests probiotics could prevent obesity and insulin resistance | KurzweilAI

Study suggests probiotics could prevent obesity and insulin resistance | KurzweilAI | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Obese vs. lean mouse (credit: Wikimedia Commons) Vanderbilt University researchers have discovered that engineered probiotic bacteria (“friendly”


Via Ray and Terry's
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Interesting idea.

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Organic Farming
There are many options out there to raising healthy food. Let's take a closer look.
Curated by Eric Larson
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Rescooped by Eric Larson from Bees, Bee Hives, and Beekeeping
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Pollen, Bees and Household Bug Spray

Pollen, Bees and Household Bug Spray | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
A 16-week study in the Midwest found that bees in a variety of landscapes were all exposed to similar pesticide levels, regardless of their proximity to treated crops.

Via Bruce Shriver
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Bee study?
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Bruce Shriver's curator insight, June 2, 6:55 PM
Pesticide-carrying agricultural crops aren't the only thing putting honeybee populations at risk, according to a recent study: your household may be, too. Bees will thank you next time you reconsider spraying insecticide around the yard (although the other pests will, too). You can read/download the research article that this story is based on at http://go.nature.com/286VJ0T
Rescooped by Eric Larson from Health, Food Security, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation
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The Post Foods Cases: When ‘Natural’ Means Stay

The Post Foods Cases: When ‘Natural’ Means Stay | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Three nearly identical class action complaints were filed recently against Post Foods on behalf of consumers, alleging that the cereal brand company’s use of the term ‘natural’ in promoting Shredded Wheat cereal constitutes false, deceptive and misleading advertising: Wu v. Post Foods (N.D.C.A. Case No. 16-cv-03494), Stephenson v. Post Foods (E.D.N.Y. Case No. 16-cv-03396) and Organic Consumers Assoc. v. Post Foods (D.C. Supr. Ct. Case No. 2016CA004551). The sole ingredient in the cereal is whole grain wheat. Plaintiffs object to the phrases “100% Natural Whole Grain Wheat” and a “Natural Source of Fiber” because the wheat crop is treated with a synthetic herbicide. According to the plaintiffs, consumers reasonably believe that a product labeled ‘natural’ contains no, and indeed has never been sprayed with any, synthetic ingredients and that the cereal advertising therefore violates California, New York and District of Columbia consumer protection laws. Of course, whether or not this is so depends in large part on how the courts, or better still the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), chooses to define ‘natural.’

Via The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California
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What does natural mean?
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Dwarf Grey Sugar Pea - (Pisum sativum)-Store.underwoodgardens.com

Dwarf Grey Sugar Pea - (Pisum sativum)-Store.underwoodgardens.com | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Dwarf Grey Sugar Pea is one of the earliest and most dwarf edible sugar pod pea around. This very old heirloom sugar pea dates to before 1773 and was likely described as the Early Dwarf Dutch Sugar pea in Fearing Burr’s book “Field and Garden Vegetables of North America”, published in 1863.


Via The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California
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Dwarf grey sugar pea?
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The Goodman Affair: Monsanto Targets the Heart of Science

The Goodman Affair: Monsanto Targets the Heart of Science | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Richard Smith, former editor of the British Medical Journal, has jested that instead of scientific peer review, its rival The Lancet had a system of throwing a pile of papers down the stairs and pu...

Via Harmon Foley
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Chickens vs. Vegetable Beds, Round Two | Garden Rant

Chickens vs. Vegetable Beds, Round Two | Garden Rant | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Via Dave Sands
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Chickens and raised beds?
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WEED BLOCK BETWEEN RAISED BEDS PART ONE

WEED BLOCK BETWEEN RAISED BEDS PART ONE | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
So this weekend, I had several things planned. Well, first I spent too long in Home Depot on Saturday (but I did get a bunch of stuff). Then on Sunday when I went to the farm again, I didn't realize how much rain we had ...

Via Dave Sands
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Dave Sands's curator insight, January 22, 2014 2:40 PM

Very interesting information concerning keeping weeds down between beds.

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Agroecology can help fix our broken food system. Here’s how. | Ensia

Agroecology can help fix our broken food system. Here’s how. | Ensia | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

“In short, there’s a systems problem with the many incarnations of ‘sustainable food.’ Good intentions notwithstanding, most alternatives leave untouched the underlying structures and forces of the agri-food system. They don’t ask how farmers can listen to their land, scientists can listen to farmers, eaters can listen to restaurant workers and the government can listen to people’s needs. Sustainable food, it turns out, lacks a science with which to deal with a system as complex as farming and food. But there is an approach that embraces complexity and change. It involves developing the capacity to listen, to grow new connections, and to build solidarity among animals, plants and people. It’s called agroecology.”


Via John Payne
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Fix the broken food system?
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John Payne's curator insight, July 29, 8:46 PM
Perhaps the most important contribution robotics can make to enabling better land management and food production practices is in the realm of data collection, building a strong foundation upon which to build a true science of sustainable methods.
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Plant These 10 Perennial Vegetables and Reap Harvests Year After Year - Modern Farmer

Plant These 10 Perennial Vegetables and Reap Harvests Year After Year - Modern Farmer | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Gardeners like perennial flowers because you do the work to get them established once and they bloom again and again. There are numerous perennial vegetable perennial vegetables as well but they lack the same recognition. Asparagus is by far the most well-known; from there the list quickly becomes obscure. But it is a beautiful world to discover, featuring crops like capers, chayote, and tree collards, which give year after year with minimal effort on your part, much like a fruit tree.


Via The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California
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Perennial vegetables?
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Raising Backyard Chickens

Subscribe to our new Food Farmer Earth channel on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/foodfarmerearth?sub_confirmation=1 Visit http://cookingupastory.com fo...

Via Mark Burrows
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Raising backyard chickens?
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Jataí bees at the entrance of their hive. Photo by Bernard Dupont.

Jataí bees at the entrance of their hive. Photo by Bernard Dupont. | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
The Tetragonisca angustula is a small, stingless, honey producing native bee in Central and South America. It is called the jataí bee in Brazil and has a different name in other regions, some of which are yatei, jaty, virginitas, angelitas ingleses, españolita, mariola, chipisas, virgencitas, and mariolitas.

Via Bruce Shriver
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Jatai bees?
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Bruce Shriver's curator insight, August 12, 4:11 PM
Here are links to some interesting articles about the Jataí Bee:

"Friday Fellow: Jataí Bee" by Boll - http://bit.ly/2bnZjvE

"Jataí bees are the only species that have a soldier caste" by Yao-Hua Law - http://bbc.in/2bo6SCs

"A morphologically specialized soldier caste improves colony defense in a neotropical eusocial bee" by Grüter et al - http://bit.ly/2b4f0tg

"Soldier production in a stingless bee depends on rearing location and nurse behaviour" by Segers et al - http://bit.ly/2b4fe3e

The Wikipedia entry for "Tetragonisca Angustula" - http://bit.ly/2bmiZ47
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Lake Erie, S. Florida algae crises share common toxins and causes

Lake Erie, S. Florida algae crises share common toxins and causes | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Several parallels exist between the putrid algae that has sickened South Florida and the green goop that has appeared in western Lake Erie nearly every summer since 1995. Florida’s Lake Okeechobee and western Lake Erie are both huge, but shallow, bodies of water. That shallowness keeps Lake Okeechobee warm year-round. It allows western Lake Erie to warm up relatively quickly each spring. Both are especially prone to algal growth because of heavy agricultural runoff that gets into their tributaries. In Lake Okeechobee’s case, the Kissimmee River south of Orlando carries a large influx of nutrients, many from cattle ranches where nutrients flow off land much as they do off corn fields in northwest Ohio, where a combination of synthetic fertilizers and soil soaked with animal manure gets

Via Ohio Wetlands Association
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Algae crisis?
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Ohio Wetlands Association's curator insight, July 25, 6:35 PM
OWA Board Member, Bill Mitsch, is quoted in this article. Thanks to Tom Henry and the Toledo Blade for their analysis.
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To Live Longer, Study Suggests Getting Protein From Plants, Not Meat ("fish & chicken not that bad")

To Live Longer, Study Suggests Getting Protein From Plants, Not Meat ("fish & chicken not that bad") | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Study suggests that people who eat more red meat die sooner than those who get their protein from plants.

How much protein you eat—and where that protein comes from—may affect your lifespan, suggests research published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. The new analysis, conducted at Massachusetts General Hospital, found that people who ate a lot of animal protein had a higher-than-average risk of dying over the next few decades, especially if they favored processed red meat over fish or poultry. Those who ate more plant-based protein, on the other hand, had a lower-than-average risk of death. 

The new research included data from two prior long-term studies, which collectively had more than 170,000 total participants. The people in these studies were tracked for 26 to 30 years and also asked to answer questions about their health and eating habits every few years. On average, they received about 14% of their daily calories from animal protein, and 4% from plant-based protein. During this time, more than 36,000 of them died. 

After adjusting the results for lifestyle and other risk factors, the researchers found that those who ate the most animal protein—defined as any type of meat, eggs, or dairy—had a slightly increased risk of death. People who ate less animal protein and consumed more protein from plant-based sources—breads, cereals, pastas, beans, nuts, and legumes—were the least likely to die during the study.

The news isn’t all bad for meat lovers, though. The increased risk of death only applied to people who had at least one "unhealthy lifestyle" factor, such as being a heavy drinker, a smoker, or overweight or obese, or getting very little exercise. For participants who led overall healthy lifestyles, the link disappeared.


Via Bert Guevara
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Beans over red meat for protein?
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, August 16, 11:21 PM
The enemy is processed and unprocessed red meat. If you can't help animal meat, fish and chicken is better. Otherwise, this study suggests plant-based protein food.

"Indeed, when they broke down the study results into specific types of animal protein, they found that the link between animal protein and increased risk of death applied primarily to people who ate lots of processed and unprocessed red meats (including beef and pork), and not to fish or poultry.
“Our findings suggest that people should consider eating more plant proteins than animal proteins,” said Dr. Song, “and when they do choose among sources of animal protein, fish and chicken are probably better choices."
Rescooped by Eric Larson from WHAT THINGS ARE GMO FOODS OR SUPPORTERS OF MONSANTO? Weather Disasters
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Could Worms In Your Gut Cure Your Allergies?

Could Worms In Your Gut Cure Your Allergies? | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Some people are trying to treat autoimmune problems with an unlikely tool: worms that live in your gut, permanently. Scientists are finally starting to figure out whether they work.
Via Poppen Report
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Allergy cure?
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Rescooped by Eric Larson from Health, Food Security, Nutrition, Physical Fitness, & Recreation
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This Region is Twice Flint's Size—and its Water is Also Poisoned

This Region is Twice Flint's Size—and its Water is Also Poisoned | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
In two of California's most productive farming regions, at least 212,000 people rely on water that's routinely unsafe to drink, with levels of a toxin  above its federal limit. And even if the pollution source could be stopped tomorrow, these communities—representing a population more than twice as large as that of Flint, Michigan— would endure the effects of past practices for decades. That's the takeaway of a major new assessment by researchers at the University of California-Davis.


Via The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California
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The True Cost of Food - why organic is not too expensive, but conventional too cheap

Organic vegetables and fruits are the best, aren't they? But they seem expensive. That's why we, as a supplier of organic food, decided to share the Tru

Via The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California
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Really? Organic not too expensive?
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Pusa Asita Carrot (Black Carrot) - (Daucus carota)-Store.underwoodgardens.com

Pusa Asita Carrot (Black Carrot) - (Daucus carota)-Store.underwoodgardens.com | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
The Pusa Asita Carrot is very unique, developed with traditional plant breeding for the highest possible nutrient density. It is the work of Pritam Kalia, Head of Vegetable Science at the Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi.


Via The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California
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Unusual carrot?
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The Monsanto Tipping Point Has Been Reached: We Shall Overcome Global Food Injustice (GMO)

Monsanto is now in full retreat against a global grassroots rejection of its poisons and lies. The company is backpedaling on every front now, even admitting defeat in Europe and now trying to focu...

Via Harmon Foley
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Monsanto tipping point?
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Over 100 Raised Beds... and growing! - Buffalo Rising

Over 100 Raised Beds... and growing! - Buffalo Rising | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Very interesting site. Unique raised beds on a disused roof car park.


Via Dave Sands
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Di-Wheel Concept | Australian Centre for Field Robotics

Video demonstration of the di-wheel concept for agricultural use

Via John Payne
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Interesting invention?
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OCA Mexico Defends Maya Beekeepers from Monsanto

OCA Mexico Defends Maya Beekeepers from Monsanto | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
The art of beekeeping in Maya communities can be traced back centuries. Beekeepers pass the skill down from one generation to the next.

For these indigenous communities in Mexico’s Campeche and Yucatán regions, beekeeping isn’t just a tradition or a hobby. For many, it’s a livelihood. 

And that livelihood is now being threatened by Monsanto.

Via The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California
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Maya beekeepers?
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Garlic-Store.underwoodgardens.com

Garlic-Store.underwoodgardens.com | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Garlic Is Da Bomb!

Via The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California
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Growing garlic?
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Squash Bees: How squash agriculture spread bees in pre-Columbian North America

Squash Bees: How squash agriculture spread bees in pre-Columbian North America | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
"Using genetic markers, researchers have found that the spread of the squash bee in pre-Columbian Central and North America was tied to the spread of squash agriculture. This is the first time researchers have been able to show how cultivating a specific crop led to the expansion of a pollinator species." See http://bit.ly/28VKrmj

Via Bruce Shriver
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Squash bees?
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Bruce Shriver's curator insight, June 26, 4:07 PM
Unlike the honey bees which fly during the day, squash bees fly before sunrise. You can read about squash bees at http://bit.ly/28Vtqty
Eric Larson's curator insight, July 10, 8:40 AM
Genetic markers and bees?
Rescooped by Eric Larson from Cannabis & Drug Policy Reform
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Cannabis Fights Cartilage Loss in Arthritis - Culture Magazine - Cannabis Lifestyle and News Magazine

Cannabis Fights Cartilage Loss in Arthritis -  Culture Magazine - Cannabis Lifestyle and News Magazine | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
RT @iReadCulture: Cannabis Fights Cartilage Loss in Arthritis - https://t.co/v93APiuNfu #cannabis #iReadCulture #arthritis https://t.co/59V…
Via MildGreen Initiative
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Arthritis help?
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MildGreen Initiative's curator insight, August 18, 6:26 AM
We need Better Joints, JK!
Rescooped by Eric Larson from Green Consumer Forum
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Health Benefits of Pineapples | Organic Facts ("cures cough & colds, digestion, lose weight, etc.")

Health Benefits of Pineapples | Organic Facts ("cures cough & colds, digestion, lose weight, etc.") | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Pineapples can improve respiratory health, cure cough and colds, improve digestion, help you lose weight, strengthen bones, improve oral health.

Pineapples are a funny-looking fruit with a serious impact on health, and their health and medicinal benefits include their ability to improve respiratory health, cure coughs and colds, improve digestion, help you lose weight, strengthen bones, improve oral health, boost eye health, reduce inflammation, prevent cancer, increase heart health, fight off infections and parasites, improve the immune system, and increase circulation.

Arthritis Management: One of the most celebrated uses of pineapple in terms of health is its ability to reduce the inflammation of joints and muscles, particularly those associated with arthritis, a truly debilitating disease that affects millions of people around the world. Pineapples contain a relatively rare proteolytic enzyme called bromelain, which is primarily associated with breaking down complex proteins, but it also has serious anti-inflammatory effects, and has been positively correlated with reducing the signs and symptoms of arthritis in many test subjects.

Immune System: A single serving of pineapple has more than 130% of the daily requirement of vitamin-C for human beings, making it one of the richest and most delicious sources of ascorbic acid.

Tissue and Cellular Health: One of the commonly overlooked benefits of vitamin C is its essential role in creating collagen.

Cancer Prevention: In addition to the antioxidant potential of vitamin C in the battle against cancer, pineapples are also rich in various other antioxidants, including vitamin A, beta carotene, bromelain, various flavonoid compounds, and high levels of manganese, which is an important co-factor of superoxide dismutase, an extremely potent free radical scavenger that has been associated with a number of different cancers. Pineapple has directly been related to preventing cancers of the mouth, throat, and breast.


Via Bert Guevara
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Many health benefits from pineapples?
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, August 16, 9:51 PM
Another powerhouse fruit for everyone.

"Pineapples are a funny-looking fruit with a serious impact on health, and their health and medicinal benefits include their ability to improve respiratory health, cure coughs and colds, improve digestion, help you lose weight, strengthen bones, improve oral health, boost eye health, reduce inflammation, prevent cancer, increase heart health, fight off infections and parasites, improve the immune system, and increase circulation."
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Soil Carbon Restoration: Can Biology Do the Job?

Soil Carbon Restoration: Can Biology Do the Job? | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
A great deal of discussion in scientific and governmental circles has been focused recently on how to deal with greenhouse gas emissions and the resulting weather extremes they have created. Most analysts believe we must stop burning fossil fuels to prevent further increases in atmospheric carbon, and find ways to remove carbon already in the air if we want to lessen further weather crises and the associated human tragedies, economic disruption and social conflict that they bring.


Via The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California
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Are we seeing some of these challenges?
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