Organic Farming
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We Call this a chef tray ...

We Call this a chef tray ... | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Here on the microgreen farm we produce not only the live trays and kits but provide live trays to chefs here to use on dishes and as added ingredients.  We have now created a grow your own kit based...

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Organic Farming
There are many options out there to raising healthy food. Let's take a closer look.
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RiseEarth : Cure for AIDS? Bee Venom Destroys HIV Cells, Finds Washington University Study

RiseEarth : Cure for AIDS? Bee Venom Destroys HIV Cells, Finds Washington University Study | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Only together we can make a difference! The truth awaits to be known.

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Watch How A Guy Removes A Wild Infestation Of Bees, While Preserving The Hive

Watch How A Guy Removes A Wild Infestation Of Bees, While Preserving The Hive | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Rather than let these bees get killed by insecticide, Cody (of Cody's Lab) saved the colony and relocated them to his own personal hive.

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This Is Your Brain On Junk Food

This Is Your Brain On Junk Food | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Food companies are spending millions of dollars to design foods with addictive sensations. What can you and I do about it? Is there any way to counteract the money, the science, and the advertising behind the junk food industry?

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The BioSync Team's curator insight, November 17, 2013 8:18 PM

Learn how food scientists and manufacturers have created food addictions by design and read tips to counter the cravings including the "outer ring strategy" and "5 ingredient rule".


Read more ...

Sandi Cornez's curator insight, November 18, 2013 7:48 PM

Read how the food companies trick you into craving junk food by making certain foods more addictive and tasty than others.

 

Steven Witherly, a food scientist has spent the last 20 years studying the why of addictive junk food. Read the entire article to get links to his excellent report, "Why Humans Like Junk Food".

 

Witherly says there are 2 factors that make eating pleasurable: one is the sensation of eating the food. This includes tastes, smell, and mouthfeel - which is very important. Food companies spend millions of dollars to discover the satisfying level of crunch in a potato chip or the perfect amount of fizzle in a soda. These factors all combine to create the food your brain craves.

 

The second factor is the actual macronutrient makeup of the food - blend of proteins, carbs, and fats it contains. And in the case of junk food, the manufacturers are looking for the perfect combination of salt, sugar, and fat that excites your brain, and gets you coming back for more.

 

So what can you do about this craving because as you probably know by now, junk food is unhealthy and causes a myriad of chronic diseases, weight gain, obesity, and even death in certain individuals. 

 

As you begin eating less and less processed foods, you begin to go through a transition period known as "gene reprogramming".

 

Best strategy is to avoid buying these products. If you can't do that then try to reduce the amount you buy/eat by using his strategies.

 

"Outer ring" and "5 ingredient rule". 

Shop on the outer ring of the grocery store where the produce section is located and the eggs, meats, fish etc. Remember you're really wanting real whole food, food that you're body recognizes, and food that serves your body.

 

.If the product has more than 5 ingredients, then put it back on the shelf. It most likely is trying to trick you into buying.

 

Eat a variety of foods and eat Rainbow Foods. These are the foods that contain the antioxidants, the phytonutrients, the minerals, and vitamins that your body craves.

 

Instead of eating a chip with a dip of unknown ingredients. try eating carrots, celery, red, orange peppers with hummus or nut butters. You'll still get the crunch and your body will thank you by keeping you healthy. Just remember to chew slowly and you'll get a great mouthfeel. Plus your digestive system will be happy.

 

And there are better alternatives to handling stress than eating junk foods which really do not comfort you in the long run. Listen to music you like, get up and dance with your special ones, breathe deeply and let out a pleasurable sound, try yoga, meditation, take a nature walk, sing in the shower, laugh for no reason - a great stress reducer, help someone else and you'll forget your problems.

 

This www.scoop.it/t/zestful-living site is being curated by Sandi Cornez. Follow Sandi for more healthy food tips and wisdom @www.facebook.com/wisdomfromthewell

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Monsanto’s Roundup and Other Glyphosate-Based Herbicides Directly Linked to Chronic Disease Spike

Monsanto’s Roundup and Other Glyphosate-Based Herbicides Directly Linked to Chronic Disease Spike | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
“ A new correlation study published in the Journal of Organic Systems has linked glyphosate, the primary ingredient in Monsanto’s best-selling herbicide, Roundup, to an enormous increase in chronic d...”
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Stephanie Anderson's curator insight, December 28, 2014 4:10 PM
Glyphosate Herbicide- Genocide-Attack on the human and plant microbiome.
John Decato's curator insight, March 27, 2015 12:49 PM

This is the real deal and the real reason much of the food we eat causes so many of the issues we have with our health.  This crap is everywhere and very difficult to avoid.

Eric Larson's curator insight, September 26, 2016 9:20 AM
Roundup linked to disease spike?
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RiseEarth : Homemade Ginger Oil To Replace Pain Pills, Cough Syrup, Antibiotics

RiseEarth : Homemade Ginger Oil To Replace Pain Pills, Cough Syrup, Antibiotics | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Only together we can make a difference! The truth awaits to be known.

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GMO and Monsanto Roundup: Glyphosate Weedkiller in our Food and Water?

GMO and Monsanto Roundup: Glyphosate Weedkiller in our Food and Water? | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Historians may look back and write about how willing we are to sacrifice our children and jeopardize future generations with a massive experiment that is based on false promises and flawed science ...

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Caloric restriction increases monkey lifespan, benefits health

Caloric restriction increases monkey lifespan, benefits health | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Can the lifespan of an animal be increased by restricting their intake of calories? The question has been the subject of study for decades, primarily through two concurrent long-term experiments using rhesus monkeys. Interestingly, these two studies came to conflicting conclusions, but by comparing their results and accounting for other variables, scientists have now determined that the answer is yes – caloric restriction does help monkeys stay healthier and live longer.

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33 blood-cancer patients have dramatic clinical remission with new T-cell therapy | KurzweilAI

Chinese doctors have reported success with a new type of immunotherapy for multiple myeloma*, a blood cancer: 33 out of 35 patients in a clinical trial had clinical remission within two months.

The researchers used a type of T cell called “chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T.”** In a phase I clinical trial in China, the patient’s own T cells were collected, genetically reprogrammed in a lab, and injected back into the patient. The reprogramming involved inserting an artificially designed gene into the T-cell genome, which helped the genetically reprogrammed cells find and destroy cancer cells throughout the body.

The study was presented Monday (June 5, 2017) at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) conference in Chicago.

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A better way to predict environmental impacts of agricultural production | Stanford News

A better way to predict environmental impacts of agricultural production | Stanford News | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Scientists at Stanford, the University of Minnesota and Unilever have found a way to better predict and quantify environmental impacts.

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Monsanto attempt to block glyphosate from California cancer list tossed by judge

Monsanto attempt to block glyphosate from California cancer list tossed by judge | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
A California state court has dismissed a legal challenge by multinational agribusiness firm Monsanto that seeks to bar the state from adding glyphosate, the lead ingredient in the company's Roundup herbicide, to a list of cancer-causing chemicals.
On March 10, Fresno County Superior Court Judge Kristi Culver Kapetan ruled against Monsanto's challenge to a provision of Proposition 65, a California voter initiative passed in 1986 that requires the state's governor to publicize a list of chemicals known to cause cancer.

The California Office of Environmental Health Health Hazard Assessment proposed to add glyphosate to the Proposition 65 list after the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified the chemical as a probable human carcinogen in 2015.

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GMO 'superseeds' leading to 'superweeds'

  The approval by the U.S. Department of Agriculture this month for new soy and corn seeds by Dow Chemical is setting off another battle over genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

At issue is whether the extended use of GMOs is creating a new type of "superweed."

These weeds are developing resistance to herbicides, because the GMO seeds can tolerate greater use of certain herbicides and pesticides.

As more herbicides are sprayed, that's created stronger, herbicide resistant weeds on farmland, reportedly costing farmers a billion dollars in lost crops.

"It is a crisis situation," said Neil Harker, a weed ecologist at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. "We're losing the effectiveness of herbicide tools against weeds going forward."

"I'm in favor of GMOs, but they should be used judiciously," he said.

Others say the weed infestation is one more reason to avoid GMOs altogether.

"We don't need pesticide-resistant GMOs to control weeds. There are natural ways to fight them," said Bill Freese, a science policy expert at the Center for Food Safety.

"The GMO industry likes to put a warm fuzzy glow on GMOs but we don't see much use for them at all," he argued.

However, farmers like Bill Horan, who has 4,000 acres in northwest Iowa, believe GMO seeds are irreplaceable. "We've used GMO corn seeds for decades and they're a great product," said the 66-year-old Horan. "It's always a battle with weeds but with the new seeds, the pesticides work better," he said.

$1 billion in damages

The newest genetically modified corn and soybeans were developed by Dow AgroSciences, a division of Dow Chemical. They are to be sold under the brand Enlist Weed Control System.

The seeds can tolerate glyphosate, the world's most widely used herbicide, as well as the lesser used herbicide called 2,4-D.

While approved by the USDA on Sept. 17, the seeds still need the go-ahead from the Environmental Protection Agency for their herbicide-resistant formula. However, that approval is expected, according to experts, with the seeds going to market in 2015.

The infestation of superweeds has more than doubled since 2009, according to Dow Chemical, which also states that an estimated 70 million acres of U.S. farmland are infested with herbicide-tolerant weeds that cost roughly $1 billion in damages to crops so far.

In an email response to CNBC.com, a Dow spokesperson wrote: "We agree with our critics that with unvarying use of the same model of weed control action ... weeds will adapt. We differ from critics however, in that we believe the best way to promote responsible use of weed control technology is to provide growers with the broadest practicable range of weed control options."

Other companies making grains resistant to herbicides include Pioneer, Syngenta and Monsanto, the world's largest producer of GMOs.

Monsanto also makes the herbicide Roundup, whose chief ingredient is glyphosate.


"(Weed) resistance to herbicides existed prior to the introduction of genetically engineered seeds," wrote a Monsanto spokesperson in an email to CNBC.

"Monsanto has been working for many years with scientists and academics to educate growers on the need for multiple modes of action," the email said.

'More toxic' herbicides
Because the fight against weeds is hardly new, that's a reason to avoid putting all the blame on GMOs for the current infestation, said Justin Gardner, a professor of agribusiness at Middle Tennessee State University.

"What's going on is natural selection," Gardner said. "Weeds were resistant before GMOs. The best way around this is to use different weed killers instead of the same one all the time."

But the increased resistance by weeds to herbicides only highlights why GMOs are at fault, said Itzick Vatnick, a professor of biology, biochemistry and environmental science at Widener University.

Read MoreUnapproved GMO wheat find should not hurt U.S. exports

"With the introduction of GMOs engineered to resist glyphosate in the mid-1990s, genetic resistance of many weeds to it rose dramatically," he said.

"The problem is so severe that the agrochemcial companies are now poised to introduce herbicides that are more toxic," Vatnick argued.

Divide deepens

The superweed infestation is unlikely to end the debate over GMOs. If anything, it just deepens the divide, say analysts.

The companies that make GMOs vouch for their safety and continued use. Bill Horan sees them as life-changing.

"We don't have weeds anymore, so we can take time to do the little things like going to our kids' swim team lessons," said Horan, who's harvesting his 40th corn crop this year.

"We couldn't do that when I was growing up when we didn't have the GMOs," he said.


But the critics point to what they say is a continuing list of harmful effects.

The Center for Food Safety's Freese said increased herbicide use—because GMOs are more herbicide tolerant—are decimating the monarch butterfly population in the U.S.

Freese said it's decreased by 90 percent due to herbicides killing off the milkweed that is a natural habitat for the butterflies.

John Kempf, a farmer and CEO of Advancing Eco Agriculture, a soil nutrition consulting firm, said GMOs fail to match their claims.

"They don't increase crop yields and they increase the resistance of weeds to herbicides," he said. "We should use the science of nutrition for the soil instead of the science of GMOs." 


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Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact - Bonny (2015) - Env Management

Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact - Bonny (2015) - Env Management | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Genetically modified (GM) crops have been and continue to be a subject of controversy despite their rapid adoption by farmers where approved. For the last two decades, an important matter of debate has been their impact on pesticide use, particularly for herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Some claim that these crops bring about a decrease in herbicide use, while others claim the opposite...

 

The repetition of glyphosate-tolerant crops and of glyphosate only applications in the same fields without sufficient alternation and herbicide diversity has contributed to the appearance of glyphosate-resistant weeds. These weeds have resulted in a rise in the use of glyphosate and other herbicides. This article explores this situation and the impacts of herbicide-resistant weeds...

 

The paper analyzes the spread of GMHT crops worldwide and their consequences on herbicide use in the USA in particular. It then addresses the global development of glyphosate-resistant weeds and their impact, particularly focusing on the USA... The last section explores how industry, farmers, and weed scientists are coping with the spread of resistant weeds... 

 

In the last 20 years, almost all GM crops have been herbicide tolerant (HT) or insect resistant, and thus an important topic of debate has been their impact on pesticide use... Insect-resistant crops have generally led to a decrease of previously used insecticides, while the impact of HT crop varies and is more unclear.. 

 

For the last 15 years, a new factor has fueled the controversy: the development of weeds resistant to glyphosate... Since the 1950s when weedkillers began to be widely used, 245 herbicide-resistant (HR) weeds have appeared over the years and many weed species have developed resistance to different herbicides. Hence weed resistance is not a new phenomenon... 

 

However, GMHT crops are greatly affected by glyphosate-resistant (GR) weeds, due to the high predominance of glyphosate-tolerant [GT] crops since 1996. In addition, glyphosate is by far the most widely used herbicide, also widely applied on non-HT crops. Thus this paper focuses mainly on glyphosate. Although there are fewer weed species resistant to glyphosate today than there are species resistant to some other herbicides... 

 

The aim of this paper is thus to analyze in more depth the importance of glyphosate-resistant weeds in relation to GMHT crops, as well as their impact and the remedial measures that the involved stakeholders are implementing or looking for... 

 

The environmental impact of GT crops was often assessed as beneficial by a great number of papers, due to the fact that some rather noxious herbicides previously used were replaced by glyphosate. Indeed at that time, glyphosate was often considered to be rather benign. Another frequently mentioned benefit was the concomitant expansion of soil conservation practices, to which glyphosate-tolerant crops are well suited... 

 

As the trend in the amount of herbicide use is frequently not sufficient to evaluate the environmental impact, it is useful to take into account the health and environmental profiles of herbicides. This is, however, a complicated task... A certain number of articles have used the Environmental Impact Quotient (EIQ)... the EIQ was recently assessed as ‘‘a poor indicator of potential environmental risk of herbicides’’... Thus Kniss and Coburn (2015) call for better approaches... 

 

The rise in GR weeds has a broad impact, and glyphosate’s loss of efficacy is seen as having great repercussions in the areas growing many GT crops... Glyphosate is now often increasingly supplemented, and sometimes replaced, by other herbicides; however, these are frequently more harmful and difficult to use... Moreover, since 1997, the number of new active herbicide ingredients put onto the market has declined... Hence weed control may be more difficult to accomplish. This decrease in the marketing of new active ingredients is partly an outcome of the expansion of GT crops. Indeed, the market for herbicides other than glyphosate has grown smaller; at the same time, the number of agrochemical companies has decreased... 

 

Because of the high impact of herbicide-resistant weeds, weed scientists, crop advisors, and GM seed companies prompt farmers to adopt better weed management practices. In addition, the solution the involved companies put forward is to shift toward GM crops with tolerance trait to glyphosate (or another herbicide) stacked with one or two other HT traits such as tolerance to 2,4-D, Dicamba, glufosinate, etc. ... 

 

A number of farmers and weed scientists think that a new paradigm, a new way of tackling weed management and weed resistance to herbicides, is necessary. This would be, notably, integrated weed management (IWM)... that integrates different methods of weed control to provide the crop an advantage over weeds... combines the coordinated use of multiple techniques to reduce weed pressure, instead of putting the main emphasis on herbicides... 

 

IWM ‘‘provides opportunities to reduce selection pressure for
weed resistance’’. Among other aspects, IWM requires better knowledge on weeds, crops, and their interactions, preventive measures against weed infestation, early detection, rapid response, regular monitoring of weeds, and integrated use of several methods, such as crop rotation, cover crops and mulches, reduced tillage, precision agriculture, adequate seeding rates, seed quality, etc. ... 

 

The HT traits appears more lucrative at present... before the eventual launching and marketing of the next kinds of traits or innovations... dealing with food quality, drought tolerance, bioenergy, chemical, and polymers, which have often been presented as the next waves of agricultural biotechnology... Companies are also investing in other biotech applications and other lines of products, such as biopesticides, as well as tools for farmers to gather and analyze field-level data for precision farming. Thus HT crops may be still used for some time, while the next products or services are under development. 

 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00267-015-0589-7

 


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Maui Initiative to Ban GMO Crops Gets Enough Signatures for Ballot - Honolulu Civil Beat

Maui Initiative to Ban GMO Crops Gets Enough Signatures for Ballot - Honolulu Civil Beat | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Honolulu Civil Beat Maui Initiative to Ban GMO Crops Gets Enough Signatures for Ballot Honolulu Civil Beat A group of Maui County residents has collected enough valid signatures to put a temporary ban on genetically modified crops before voters...

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Tumor Scanner Promises Fast 3D Imaging of Biopsies

Tumor Scanner Promises Fast 3D Imaging of Biopsies | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
After surgically removing a tumor from a cancer patient, doctors like to send off some of the tissue for evaluation by a pathologist to get a better idea of whether the margins are cancer free and to guide further treatment decisions. But for technical reasons, completing the pathology report can take days, much to the…

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This is amazing! 

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The Health Benefits of Honey - Green Living - Natural Home & Garden

The Health Benefits of Honey - Green Living - Natural Home & Garden | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
In addition to being a tasty natural sweetener, honey is rich with healing antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Discover the many health benefits of honey!

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The Vitamin That Targets And Kills Cancer Stem Cells | Care2 Healthy Living

The Vitamin That Targets And Kills Cancer Stem Cells | Care2 Healthy Living | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Discover the vitamin that destroys cancer stem cells-by best-selling author of 60 SECONDS TO SLIM, THE LIFE FORCE DIET, & BE YOUR OWN HERBALIST, Dr. Cook.

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Did you know that Vitamin C has been found to seek out and destroy cancer stem cells?

 

Because vitamin C is water soluble. it’s not stored in your body and therefore needs to be eaten on a daily basis to avoid being deficient.

 

Health Tips:

Are you aware that red pepper and broccoli have more vitamin C than does citrus fruits? Eating vitamin C rich foods can improve iron absorption in your body.

 

As for supplements, vitamin C in pill form doesn’t seem to work states Dr Michael Greger inches book, “How Not to Die”.

 

Read more about “The Vitamin that targets and Kills Cancer Stem Cells” from www.care2.com by Michelle Schoffro Cook.

 

This www.scoop.it/t/zestful-living site is being curated by Sandi Cornez. Follow sandi for more healthy food/water tips @https://www.facebook.com/wisdomfromthewell

 

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8 Toxic Foods Banned Around the World But Not in the USA

Learn more about other toxic foods on my website here

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Gotu Kola Benefits for the Brain, the Nerves and Varicose Veins

Gotu kola is an Ayurvedic herb that is particularly replenishing and rejuvenating for the nervous system. Also known as a "brain tonic" for increasin

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Severe pollution ‘devastating’ China’s vital ecosystem, research study shows

Severe pollution ‘devastating’ China’s vital ecosystem, research study shows | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

The startling extent to which man-made pollution is devastating China’s vital ecosystem’s ability to offset damaging carbon emissions has been revealed.

 

The study found that the Net Primary Productivity (NPP) – or the amount of carbon plants in an ecosystem can take in – is significantly reduced when the amount of surface ozone increases. Crucially, this reduction is significantly greater than the effect aerosol particles have in encouraging plants to increase carbon intake through reducing canopy temperatures and increasing the scattering of light.

 

Professor Unger added: “Essentially, our results reveal a strong ‘dampening effect’ of air pollution on the land carbon uptake in China today. “This is significant for a number of reasons, not least because the increase in surface ozone produced by man-made pollution in the region will continue to grow over the next 15 years unless something is done. “If – and it is of course a big ‘if’ – China reduce their pollution to the maximum levels, we could reduce the amount of damage to the ecosystems by up to 70 per cent - offering protection of this critical ecosystem service and the mitigation of long-term global warming.”

 


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33 blood-cancer patients have dramatic clinical remission with new T-cell therapy | KurzweilAI

Chinese doctors have reported success with a new type of immunotherapy for multiple myeloma*, a blood cancer: 33 out of 35 patients in a clinical trial had clinical remission within two months.

The researchers used a type of T cell called “chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T.”** In a phase I clinical trial in China, the patient’s own T cells were collected, genetically reprogrammed in a lab, and injected back into the patient. The reprogramming involved inserting an artificially designed gene into the T-cell genome, which helped the genetically reprogrammed cells find and destroy cancer cells throughout the body.

The study was presented Monday (June 5, 2017) at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) conference in Chicago.

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Hemp Is God's Gift To Mankind

Hemp Is God's Gift To Mankind https://myclub8.com/home/?rep=6735 * Mike Adams is a food scientist running LC/MS instrumentation to examine organic compound

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How To Grow Red Amaranth - A Nutrition Powerhouse Superfood

How To Grow Red Amaranth - A Nutrition Powerhouse Superfood How To Grow Red Amaranth - A Nutrition Powerhouse Superfood How To Grow Red Amaranth -

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India: Genetic Engineering, the Commercialization of GM Mustard and the Future of Agriculture | Global Research - Centre for Research on Globalization

India: Genetic Engineering, the Commercialization of GM Mustard and the Future of Agriculture | Global Research - Centre for Research on Globalization | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
The importance of GM mustard should not be underestimated. It is central to the whole debate about the future of agriculture in India and the wider development paradigm. GM mustard is a Trojan horse that would help pave the way for ripping up the economic and social fabric of India and recast for the benefit of powerful Western corporations, not least Bayer-Monsanto (see GM Mustard in India to read my numerous articles on this issue).


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GMO 'superseeds' leading to 'superweeds'

  The approval by the U.S. Department of Agriculture this month for new soy and corn seeds by Dow Chemical is setting off another battle over genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

At issue is whether the extended use of GMOs is creating a new type of "superweed."

These weeds are developing resistance to herbicides, because the GMO seeds can tolerate greater use of certain herbicides and pesticides.

As more herbicides are sprayed, that's created stronger, herbicide resistant weeds on farmland, reportedly costing farmers a billion dollars in lost crops.

"It is a crisis situation," said Neil Harker, a weed ecologist at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. "We're losing the effectiveness of herbicide tools against weeds going forward."

"I'm in favor of GMOs, but they should be used judiciously," he said.

Others say the weed infestation is one more reason to avoid GMOs altogether.

"We don't need pesticide-resistant GMOs to control weeds. There are natural ways to fight them," said Bill Freese, a science policy expert at the Center for Food Safety.

"The GMO industry likes to put a warm fuzzy glow on GMOs but we don't see much use for them at all," he argued.

However, farmers like Bill Horan, who has 4,000 acres in northwest Iowa, believe GMO seeds are irreplaceable. "We've used GMO corn seeds for decades and they're a great product," said the 66-year-old Horan. "It's always a battle with weeds but with the new seeds, the pesticides work better," he said.

$1 billion in damages

The newest genetically modified corn and soybeans were developed by Dow AgroSciences, a division of Dow Chemical. They are to be sold under the brand Enlist Weed Control System.

The seeds can tolerate glyphosate, the world's most widely used herbicide, as well as the lesser used herbicide called 2,4-D.

While approved by the USDA on Sept. 17, the seeds still need the go-ahead from the Environmental Protection Agency for their herbicide-resistant formula. However, that approval is expected, according to experts, with the seeds going to market in 2015.

The infestation of superweeds has more than doubled since 2009, according to Dow Chemical, which also states that an estimated 70 million acres of U.S. farmland are infested with herbicide-tolerant weeds that cost roughly $1 billion in damages to crops so far.

In an email response to CNBC.com, a Dow spokesperson wrote: "We agree with our critics that with unvarying use of the same model of weed control action ... weeds will adapt. We differ from critics however, in that we believe the best way to promote responsible use of weed control technology is to provide growers with the broadest practicable range of weed control options."

Other companies making grains resistant to herbicides include Pioneer, Syngenta and Monsanto, the world's largest producer of GMOs.

Monsanto also makes the herbicide Roundup, whose chief ingredient is glyphosate.


"(Weed) resistance to herbicides existed prior to the introduction of genetically engineered seeds," wrote a Monsanto spokesperson in an email to CNBC.

"Monsanto has been working for many years with scientists and academics to educate growers on the need for multiple modes of action," the email said.

'More toxic' herbicides
Because the fight against weeds is hardly new, that's a reason to avoid putting all the blame on GMOs for the current infestation, said Justin Gardner, a professor of agribusiness at Middle Tennessee State University.

"What's going on is natural selection," Gardner said. "Weeds were resistant before GMOs. The best way around this is to use different weed killers instead of the same one all the time."

But the increased resistance by weeds to herbicides only highlights why GMOs are at fault, said Itzick Vatnick, a professor of biology, biochemistry and environmental science at Widener University.

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"With the introduction of GMOs engineered to resist glyphosate in the mid-1990s, genetic resistance of many weeds to it rose dramatically," he said.

"The problem is so severe that the agrochemcial companies are now poised to introduce herbicides that are more toxic," Vatnick argued.

Divide deepens

The superweed infestation is unlikely to end the debate over GMOs. If anything, it just deepens the divide, say analysts.

The companies that make GMOs vouch for their safety and continued use. Bill Horan sees them as life-changing.

"We don't have weeds anymore, so we can take time to do the little things like going to our kids' swim team lessons," said Horan, who's harvesting his 40th corn crop this year.

"We couldn't do that when I was growing up when we didn't have the GMOs," he said.


But the critics point to what they say is a continuing list of harmful effects.

The Center for Food Safety's Freese said increased herbicide use—because GMOs are more herbicide tolerant—are decimating the monarch butterfly population in the U.S.

Freese said it's decreased by 90 percent due to herbicides killing off the milkweed that is a natural habitat for the butterflies.

John Kempf, a farmer and CEO of Advancing Eco Agriculture, a soil nutrition consulting firm, said GMOs fail to match their claims.

"They don't increase crop yields and they increase the resistance of weeds to herbicides," he said. "We should use the science of nutrition for the soil instead of the science of GMOs." 


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