Organic Farming
Follow
Find
213 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Eric Larson from Vertical Farm - Food Factory
onto Organic Farming
Scoop.it!

Radish Mania - First of New Specialty Microgreen Kits

Radish Mania - First of New Specialty Microgreen Kits | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
MicrogreenFarm is proud to unveil a new line of fun to grow hydroponic microgreen kits.  The first in our line is called Radish Mania and features two wonderful new seeds from one of our favorite...

Via Alan Yoshioka
Eric Larson's insight:

Clever idea.

more...
No comment yet.
Organic Farming
There are many options out there to raising healthy food. Let's take a closer look.
Curated by Eric Larson
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Eric Larson from The Healthy & Green Consumer
Scoop.it!

5 Blood Sugar-Regulating Foods for Diabetics ("cinnamon, oatmeal, broccoli, ginseng, salmon")

5 Blood Sugar-Regulating Foods for Diabetics ("cinnamon, oatmeal, broccoli, ginseng, salmon") | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Whether you have Type 2 or Type 1 diabetes, you can benefit from eating foods that help stabilize blood glucose levels. Here are 5 beneficial foods.

1. Cinnamon

A study published in the journal Diabetes Care in 2003 found daily consumption of cinnamon had positive effects on blood sugar, along with several other markers. The 40-day study period concluded with reductions in blood serum glucose levels of 18 to 29%. But it also worked to reduce triglyceride levels (23-30%), LDL cholesterol (7-27%), and total cholesterol (12-26%).

Cinnamon for diabetes could be one of the most effective known dietary solutions out there.

2. Oatmeal

Because oatmeal is a slow-digesting carbohydrate, it won’t raise blood sugar levels as quickly or as much as other carbs. It’s a better option over white toast, for example. In addition, it can help control weight, a factor in the management of diabetes Type 2 specifically.

3. Broccoli

Like oatmeal, broccoli is high in fiber and is a good replacement for other starchy options. Vegetables like potatoes and corn, for instance, can cause spikes in blood sugar. In addition, broccoli is a good source of chromium, which has been shown to help stabilize blood sugar levels.

4. Ginseng

Ginseng, a root, has been shown to lower fasting and post-meal blood sugar levels. It can be added to the diet as a tea or found in the supplement aisle.

5. Salmon

Salmon is all protein and no carbohydrates, a good mix for blood sugar regulation. Further, it is rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, which are great forboosting heart health—something diabetics must be cautious of. Like broccoli, salmon is also a good source of chromium.

When it comes to controlling diabetes, we often think of what is on the do not eat list. But foods like these are important additions that can improve your health and make the disease easier to manage.


Via Bert Guevara
Eric Larson's insight:

Control diabetes.

more...
Bert Guevara's curator insight, August 18, 10:30 PM

Whether you have Type 2 or Type 1, you can benefit from eating foods that help stabilize blood glucose levels. Some of these foods include:

Rescooped by Eric Larson from Organic Farming
Scoop.it!

Lake Erie's algae explosion blamed on farmers

Lake Erie's algae explosion blamed on farmers | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Huge blooms of toxic blue-green algae fouling Lake Erie recently threatened the drinking water of 400,000 people, decades after the problem was thought to be solved. Here's what scientists think is going on this time, and how it can be fixed.

Via Ohio Wetlands Association, Eric Larson
Eric Larson's insight:

Went swimming there last weekend and my feet got chemical burns and we saw some dead fish there at Port Clinton.

more...
Ohio Wetlands Association's curator insight, August 16, 5:03 AM

While it's easy to point the finger, agriculture has complicated management decisions.

Eric Larson's curator insight, August 17, 5:06 AM

Got some burns on my feet last time I was at Port Clinton.

Rescooped by Eric Larson from Ohio Wetlands
Scoop.it!

Ten Worse States For Water Pollution

Ten Worse States For Water Pollution | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Industry dumped over 206 million pounds of toxic chemicals into U.S. waterways in 2012, according to a new report by the advocacy group Environment...

Via Ohio Wetlands Association
Eric Larson's insight:

Important information.

more...
Ohio Wetlands Association's curator insight, August 16, 7:58 AM

Ohio is one of the leaders in water pollution. Yet there are many who think the U.S. EPA is over-reaching its authority to enforce the Clean Water Act. So who is out there voting against clean drinkable, swimmable, fishable lakes and rivers?

Rescooped by Eric Larson from Vertical Farm - Food Factory
Scoop.it!

Detroit Produce Peddlers: Delivering Fresh Food on Two Wheels

Detroit Produce Peddlers: Delivering Fresh Food on Two Wheels | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
While Detroit's urban farming movement has been generating excitement for more than a decade, the city's bicycling scene has been turning heads lately as well. Over the past few years, new bike lan...

Via Alan Yoshioka
Eric Larson's insight:

Clever!!!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Eric Larson from Straw Bale Gardening
Scoop.it!

Using straw bales makes Lansing woman's garden accessible

Using straw bales makes Lansing woman's garden accessible | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Click here to edit the title


Via Joel Karsten
Eric Larson's insight:

Done a little of this a few years ago.

more...
Joel Karsten's curator insight, August 10, 1:14 PM

Check out this amazing garden!  I think I might try to visit her garden when I am in Michigan in a few weeks, it looks very interesting.

Rescooped by Eric Larson from Vertical Farm - Food Factory
Scoop.it!

Indoor Farming: Future Takes Root In Abandoned Buildings, Warehouses, Empty Lots & High Rises

Indoor Farming: Future Takes Root In Abandoned Buildings, Warehouses, Empty Lots & High Rises | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
By 2050, there will be 9 billion people on Earth, with the vast majority residing in dense urban areas. But how will we feed them all?

Via Alan Yoshioka
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Eric Larson from The Healthy & Green Consumer
Scoop.it!

Why Butter Isn’t All that Bad ("better than margarine; good 4 fat-soluble vitamins + good cholesterol")

Why Butter Isn’t All that Bad ("better than margarine; good 4 fat-soluble vitamins + good cholesterol") | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Is butter bad for you, or might this vilified food actually have some value? Here is why butter is better than margarine and may actually boost health.

The Western Diet shifted several decades ago, eventually leading to the low-fat craze and the belief that fats caused disease. But as we are now finding out, this isn’t necessarily true. Saturated fats like those in butter don’t necessarily contribute to heart disease. As a matter of fact, it’s the highly processed carbohydrates that we need to be wary of instead.

Sweden recently became the first country to formally reject the low-fat idea, by developing national dietary guidelines that favor lower carbohydrate consumption and higher fats. This followed the results of a study from the Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment which found that health markers could be dramatically improved with a lower carbohydrate lifestyle.

For decades, butter was shoved to the side while margarine took over, but as this article presents, butter is actually much better for you. Butter is a source of many beneficial nutrients—things like vitamins A, D, E, and K2—all fat-soluble vitamins which are best absorbed by the body when included in a high fat package like butter.

Butter also contains trace minerals like copper, zinc, chromium, iodine, selenium, and manganese. It is rich in healthy cholesterol that protects the brain, intestines, and nervous system.

But not all butter is created equal. Butter from grass-fed cows, for instance, will have higher amounts of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) which protects the body against cancer and aids in the building of muscle. Raw butter, or that which hasn’t been pasteurized, contains something known as the Wulzen factor, a hormone-like substance that may be effective at preventing arthritis.


Via Bert Guevara
Eric Larson's insight:

Some good qualities in butter.

more...
Bert Guevara's curator insight, August 3, 9:24 AM

In heaven there is no butter; that's why eat it here and now!

Butter is a source of many beneficial nutrients—things like vitamins A, D, E, and K2—all fat-soluble vitamins which are best absorbed by the body when included in a high fat package like butter.

Rescooped by Eric Larson from urban farming
Scoop.it!

RiseEarth : 15 Air Purifying Plants to Remove Harmful Toxins

RiseEarth : 15 Air Purifying Plants to Remove Harmful Toxins | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Via Evieira
Eric Larson's insight:

Important idea.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Eric Larson from Vertical Farm - Food Factory
Scoop.it!

Saving seeds the right way can save the world's plants

Saving seeds the right way can save the world's plants | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Exotic pests, shrinking ranges and a changing climate threaten some of the world's most rare and ecologically important plants, and so conservationists establish seed collections to save the seeds in banks or botanical gardens in hopes of preserving some genetic diversity. For decades, these seed collections have been guided by simple models that offer a one-size-fits-all approach for how many seeds to gather. A new study, however, has found that more careful tailoring of seed collections to specific species and situations is critical to preserving plant diversity.

Via Alan Yoshioka
Eric Larson's insight:

Should we start our own seed banks???

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Eric Larson from Longevity science
Scoop.it!

Substantial Health And Economic Returns From Delayed Aging May Warrant A New Focus For Medical Research

Substantial Health And Economic Returns From Delayed Aging May Warrant A New Focus For Medical Research | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Recent scientific advances suggest that slowing the aging process (senescence) is now a realistic goal. Yet most medical research remains focused on combating individual diseases. Using the Future Elderly Model—a microsimulation of the future health and spending of older Americans—we compared optimistic “disease specific” scenarios with a hypothetical “delayed aging” scenario in terms of the scenarios’ impact on longevity, disability, and major entitlement program costs. Delayed aging could increase life expectancy by an additional 2.2 years, most of which would be spent in good health. The economic value of delayed aging is estimated to be $7.1 trillion over fifty years. In contrast, addressing heart disease and cancer separately would yield diminishing improvements in health and longevity by 2060—mainly due to competing risks. Delayed aging would greatly increase entitlement outlays, especially for Social Security. However, these changes could be offset by increasing the Medicare eligibility age and the normal retirement age for Social Security. Overall, greater investment in research to delay aging appears to be a highly efficient way to forestall disease, extend healthy life, and improve public health.


Via Ray and Terry's
Eric Larson's insight:

Another approach.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Eric Larson from Vertical Farm - Food Factory
Scoop.it!

Urban Bees Using Plastic to Build Hives | Food and Farming

Urban Bees Using Plastic to Build Hives | Food and Farming | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Researchers from Canada found two species of urban leafcutter bees, pictured, have started using small pieces of plastic as a substitute for plant resins in their nests. In both cases, larvae successfully developed and were free from parasites.

Via Alan Yoshioka
Eric Larson's insight:

Talk about adapting????

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Eric Larson from Biogas, Compost and Organic Treamtent
Scoop.it!

Study: giving up beef helps the environment more than ditching cars - Blue and Green Tomorrow

Study: giving up beef helps the environment more than ditching cars - Blue and Green Tomorrow | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Interesting ideaProducing red meat affects the environment 10 times more compared to other livestock types, as it requires more land and irrigation water, while resulting


Via James Lloyd
Eric Larson's insight:

Interesting ideas.

more...
James Lloyd's curator insight, July 22, 9:34 AM

What if you factor straw based litter, muck and slurry into a biogas plant from one of these herds? Buy Biogas Beef.

Rescooped by Eric Larson from Organic Farming
Scoop.it!

Insecticides put world food supplies at risk - HortiBiz

Insecticides put world food supplies at risk - HortiBiz | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

The world’s most widely used insecticides have contaminated the environment across the planet so pervasively that global food production is at risk, according to a comprehensive scientific assessment of the chemicals’ impacts.

The researchers compare their impact with that reported in Silent Spring, the landmark 1962 book by Rachel Carson that revealed the decimation of birds and insects by the blanket use of DDT and other pesticides and led to the modern environmental movement.

Billions of dollars’ worth of the potent and long-lasting neurotoxins are sold every year but regulations have failed to prevent the poisoning of almost all habitats, the international team of scientists concluded in the most detailed study yet. As a result, they say, creatures essential to global food production – from bees to earthworms – are likely to be suffering grave harm and the chemicals must be phased out.

The new assessment analysed the risks associated with neonicotinoids, a class of insecticides on which farmers spend $2.6bn (£1.53bn) a year. Neonicotinoids are applied routinely rather than in response to pest attacks but the scientists highlight the “striking” lack of evidence that this leads to increased crop yields.

“The evidence is very clear. We are witnessing a threat to the productivity of our natural and farmed environment equivalent to that posed by organophosphates or DDT,” said Jean-Marc Bonmatin, of the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) in France, one of the 29 international researchers who conducted the four-year assessment. “Far from protecting food production, the use of neonicotinoid insecticides is threatening the very infrastructure which enables it.” He said the chemicals imperilled food supplies by harming bees and other pollinators, which fertilise about three-quarters of the world’s crops, and the organisms that create the healthy soils which the world’s food requires in order to grow.

Professor Dave Goulson, at the University of Sussex, another member of the team, said: “It is astonishing we have learned so little. After Silent Spring revealed the unfortunate side-effects of those chemicals, there was a big backlash. But we seem to have gone back to exactly what we were doing in the 1950s. It is just history repeating itself. The pervasive nature of these chemicals mean they are found everywhere now.

“If all our soils are toxic, that should really worry us, as soil is crucial to food production."

The assessment, published on Tuesday, cites the chemicals as a key factor in the decline of bees, alongside the loss of flower-rich habitats meadows and disease. The insecticides harm bees’ ability to navigate and learn, damage their immune systems and cut colony growth. In worms, which provide a critical role in aerating soil, exposure to the chemicals affects their ability to tunnel.

Dragonflies, which eat mosquitoes, and other creatures that live in water are also suffering, with some studies showing that ditchwater has become so contaminated it could be used directly as a lice-control pesticide.

The report warned that loss of insects may be linked to major declines in the birds that feed on them, though it also notes that eating just a few insecticide-treated seeds would kill birds directly.

“Overall, a compelling body of evidence has accumulated that clearly demonstrates that the wide-scale use of these persistent, water-soluble chemicals is having widespread, chronic impacts upon global biodiversity and is likely to be having major negative effects on ecosystem services such as pollination that are vital to food security,” the study concluded.

The report is being published as a special issue of the peer-reviewed journal Environmental Science and Pollution Research and was funded by a charitable foundation run by the ethical bank Triodos.

The EU, opposed by the British government and the National Farmers Union, has already imposed a temporary three-year moratorium on the use of some neonicotinoids on some crops. This month US president Barack Obama ordered an urgent assessment of the impact of neonicotinoids on bees. But the insecticides are used all over the world on crops, as well as flea treatments in cats and dogs and to protect timber from termites.

However, the Crop Protection Association, which represents pesticide manufacturers, criticised the report. Nick von Westenholz, chief executive of the CPA, said: “It is a selective review of existing studies which highlighted worst-case scenarios, largely produced under laboratory conditions. As such, the publication does not represent a robust assessment of the safety of systemic pesticides under realistic conditions of use.”

Von Westenholz added: “Importantly, they have failed or neglected to look at the broad benefits provided by this technology and the fact that by maximising yields from land already under cultivation, more wild spaces are preserved for biodiversity. The crop protection industry takes its responsibility towards pollinators seriously. We recognise the vital role pollinators play in global food production.”

The new report, called the Worldwide Integrated Assessment on Systemic Pesticides, analysed every peer-reviewed scientific paper on neonicotinoids and another insecticide called fipronil since they were first used in the mid-1990s. These chemicals are different from other pesticides because, instead of being sprayed over crops, they are usually used to treat seeds. This means they are taken up by every part of the growing plant, including roots, leaves, pollen and nectar, providing multiple ways for other creatures to be exposed.

The scientists found that the use of the insecticides shows a “rapid increase” over the past decade and that the slow breakdown of the compounds and their ability to be washed off fields in water has led to “large-scale contamination”. The team states that current rules on use have failed to prevent dangerous levels building up in the environment.

Almost as concerning as what is known about neonicotinoids is what is not known, the researchers said. Most countries have no public data on the quantities or locations of the systemic pesticides being applied. The testing demanded by regulators to date has not determined the long-term effect of sub-lethal doses, nor has it assessed the impact of the combined impact of the cocktail of many pesticides encountered in most fields. The toxicity of neonicotinoids has only been established for very few of the species known to be exposed. For example, just four of the 25,000 known species of bee have been assessed. There is virtually no data on effects on reptiles or mammals.


Via Giri Kumar
Eric Larson's insight:

Serious business.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Eric Larson from Vertical Farm - Food Factory
Scoop.it!

Apply for a Grant

Apply for a Grant | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Via Alan Yoshioka
Eric Larson's insight:

Nice veggies!!!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Eric Larson from Ohio Wetlands
Scoop.it!

Lake Erie's algae explosion blamed on farmers

Lake Erie's algae explosion blamed on farmers | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Huge blooms of toxic blue-green algae fouling Lake Erie recently threatened the drinking water of 400,000 people, decades after the problem was thought to be solved. Here's what scientists think is going on this time, and how it can be fixed.

Via Ohio Wetlands Association
Eric Larson's insight:

Got some burns on my feet last time I was at Port Clinton.

more...
Ohio Wetlands Association's curator insight, August 16, 5:03 AM

While it's easy to point the finger, agriculture has complicated management decisions.

Eric Larson's curator insight, August 17, 5:45 AM

Went swimming there last weekend and my feet got chemical burns and we saw some dead fish there at Port Clinton.

Rescooped by Eric Larson from urban farming
Scoop.it!

RiseEarth : Four Essential Oils And 40 Ways To Use Them To Improve Your Life

RiseEarth : Four Essential Oils And 40 Ways To Use Them To Improve Your Life | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Via Evieira
Eric Larson's insight:

Exciting ideas.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Eric Larson from Vertical Farm - Food Factory
Scoop.it!

Outside Cape Town: Growing Food for Life - Organic Connections

Outside Cape Town: Growing Food for Life - Organic Connections | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Meet two amazing women living outside of Cape Town whose lives have greatly improved as a result of learning to garden.

Via Alan Yoshioka
Eric Larson's insight:

Good ideas.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Eric Larson from The Healthy & Green Consumer
Scoop.it!

The Benefits of Eating More Raw Foods ("great advantages for a healthy life without extra cost")

The Benefits of Eating More Raw Foods ("great advantages for a healthy life without extra cost") | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
A raw food diet, an even a high-raw diet, has huge advantages. Otherwise, nobody would do it! (Either as a short-term plan or long-term.)
Let’s take a good look at what the benefits are, but also understand where these benefits come from.

Easy weight managementLow-toxin dietNutrient DensityPhytochemicalsLow Toxic LoadIncreased immunityEliminating Everything Else That’s Bad for You


Via Bert Guevara
Eric Larson's insight:

We all need to be eating more raw vegetables.

more...
Bert Guevara's curator insight, August 10, 9:04 AM

Let’s take a good look at what the benefits are, but also understand where these benefits come from. Once we are clear about the benefits and what creates them in the raw food diet specifically, we can design an approach that combines the best from both raw and cooked worlds.

Essentialhealth's curator insight, August 11, 4:49 AM

You can add raw into your life to suit your needs and lifestyle.  Going completely raw isn't for everyone.Try going raw all day and then a cooked evening meal if you prefer.  Maybe half the week raw and the other half cooked.  Just get some good organic raw food into your life!

Jackie Sue Griffin's curator insight, August 11, 6:20 AM

Nature's bounty

Rescooped by Eric Larson from Vertical Farm - Food Factory
Scoop.it!

Five Urban Farms Tackling the School-to-Prison Pipeline

Five Urban Farms Tackling the School-to-Prison Pipeline | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Five urban farms that have embedded the cause of disrupting the school-to-prison pipeline into the purpose of their organization.

Via Alan Yoshioka
Eric Larson's insight:

Important idea.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Eric Larson from Florida Economic Gardening
Scoop.it!

Venture Capital: Deals Beyond the Valley

Venture Capital: Deals Beyond the Valley | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Silicon Valley is still the alpha and omega of venture capital funding. Venture capital funding totaled $29.4 billion in the U.S. in 2013, according to the PricewaterhouseCoopers and National Venture Capital Association MoneyTree report, and of that, deals in Silicon Valley accounted for nearly 42 percent of venture dollars. In fact, venture capital funding in Silicon Valley was greater than the next three regions – New England, New York Metro and Los Angeles/Orange County -combined.

 

With software, media and entertainment, and IT services categories ranking 1, 3 and 5 respectively, it’s easy to connect the dots between Silicon Valley’s vast technology  hub and the dollars that get new ideas off the ground. And while the Valley, Boston and New York continue to attract deals and dollars, other regions of the country are seeing significant increases in venture capital funding.

 

The top five venture capital categories in 2013:

1. Software ($11 billion)
2. Biotechnology/Life Sciences ($4.5 billion)
3. Media and Entertainment ($2.9 billion)
4. Medical Devices and Equipment ($2.1 billion)
5. IT Services ($2.0 billion)

 

Venture Capital: Texas and the Southeast Gain Traction

 

Venture capital funding in the Southeast totaled nearly $1.3 billion in 2013, up more than 62 percent from 2012. Texas is another growing venture capital hotspot, with the total value of deals growing 37 percent in 2013, to more than $1.3 billion. The number of deals and increased funding are in part a confirmation of emerging centers of innovation and their ability to attract the talent that fuels that growth.

 

The Southeast includes hotbeds such as Raleigh and Atlanta, where venture capital funding is on the rise. Atlanta was 13th and Raleigh was 18th on economist Richard Florida’s top 20 locations for venture capital investment in 2013. Austin, which ranked ninth on that list, has not only a booming technology sector, but also a healthy slice of Texas’ rapidly growing life sciences sector.

 

Life sciences and biotechnology are driving venture capital funding growth in other corridors as well. The Washington DC/Metroplex region doubled its venture capital funding to more than $1.5 billion in 2013. The region includes Montgomery County, MD, where more than 300 early-stag biotech companies are based, as well as  1,200 communications and information technology companies. The  Northwest also offers a convergence of software, media and entertainment, IT services and life sciences innovation. The Puget Sound region’s legacy of innovation is evidenced, of course, by Boeing, Microsoft, Amazon.com and a host of other global brands, but it is also one of the world’s centers of life sciences discovery.

 

California is still the innovation leader, attracting venture capital dollars and deals, but it certainly does not have that space to itself. As other regions attract the talent and build the infrastructure to support entrepreneurial growth in emerging industries, the venture capital highway will get even more crowded and all roads won’t lead to the Golden State.

 

How does your community stack up as a place that cultivates innovation? Where does promoting entrepreneurship fit into your economic development strategies and how does your region fare in attracting capital to promote growth in early-stage companies? Share your thoughts.


Via GrowFL
Eric Larson's insight:

Important for venture capital.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Eric Larson from Vertical Farm - Food Factory
Scoop.it!

Single experimental tree produces 40 different kinds of fruit (Video)

Single experimental tree produces 40 different kinds of fruit (Video) | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
This one single tree can grow many different types of stone fruits -- like peaches, plums, apricots, nectarines, cherries and even almonds.

Via Alan Yoshioka
Eric Larson's insight:

Special kind of propagation by grafting. Maybe a little much. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Eric Larson from Longevity science
Scoop.it!

One injection stops diabetes in its tracks: Treatment reverses symptoms of type 2 diabetes in mice without side effects

One injection stops diabetes in its tracks: Treatment reverses symptoms of type 2 diabetes in mice without side effects | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

In mice with diet-induced diabetes -- the equivalent of type 2 diabetes in humans -- a single injection of the protein FGF1 is enough to restore blood sugar levels to a healthy range for more than two days.


Via Ray and Terry's
Eric Larson's insight:

This is cool.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Eric Larson from Longevity science
Scoop.it!

Study suggests probiotics could prevent obesity and insulin resistance | KurzweilAI

Study suggests probiotics could prevent obesity and insulin resistance | KurzweilAI | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Obese vs. lean mouse (credit: Wikimedia Commons) Vanderbilt University researchers have discovered that engineered probiotic bacteria (“friendly”


Via Ray and Terry's
Eric Larson's insight:

Interesting idea.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Eric Larson from Vertical Farm - Food Factory
Scoop.it!

Free Microgreens Workshop! - Craving Greens

Free Microgreens Workshop! - Craving Greens | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Friends! On July 29, I will be giving a free workshop on how to grow your own microgreens! If you're in Montreal or in the area, come on over! Space is limited, so please sign up here. Workshop details: No garden?

Via Alan Yoshioka
Eric Larson's insight:

Good idea!!!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Eric Larson from Organic Farming
Scoop.it!

9 Habits of a Great Farmer - Organic Farming - Sustainable Agriculture - Growers Trust - Growers Trust

9 Habits of a Great Farmer - Organic Farming - Sustainable Agriculture - Growers Trust - Growers Trust | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Farming land is no easy task. For serious growers and farmers, doing so successfully requires time, money, and a ton of effort to ensure that the farm’s harvests and plentiful and growing. In reality, the majority of farmers depend on their crops to pay their bills and keep the farms sustainable and thriving. When one aspect of the harvest fails, it is up to the farmer to create a quick and effective solution to keep the farm operating the way it should be. Organic farming methods are calculated procedures that depend upon the natural biological processes to keep farms healthy. With a mix of modern technology, the right fertilizers, and traditional farming practices, maintaining a successful farm is a real possibility. It is important, however, to remember that farming practices quickly become habits.

The best farmers throughout the world make it a point to perfect their daily habits and turn them into a thriving agriculture business. The following are the top 9 habits of a great farmer:

Staying focused on revenues to ensure that cost management is stable. Stick to budgets and cover all costs of production.Remain disciplined and resolute in keeping the harvests thriving and asking for help when help is needed.Enjoy the work. A man who has fun while farming will never work a day in his life.Learn from your farming errors and make note to not make these mistakes again.Coordinate action plans for all types of “what-if” scenarios. This leaves little room for error when an unexpected storm approaches or a certain crop is producing at optimal rates.Look at your competition and compare how your harvests stack up. Using benchmarks is an excellent way to keep improving production.Be prideful and pay close attention to your reputation. People buy from the farms that they truly trust, keep that trust by building a solid foundation of good work.Sell locally. Not only does this reduce pollution, but it is an amazing way to get involved and enrich your community.Get on board with solar and wind energy now. Alternative energy is here to stay. Farms who utilize this now will be setting themselves up for big wins in the future.

Every farmer has their own unique style. Sustainable agriculture is founded by the habits that these farmers create for their farms. Make an honest effort to be the best farmer that you can be and always remember where you came from. The best farmers have the best habits. When it comes to life on the farm, make every day count.X


Via Giri Kumar
Eric Larson's insight:

Good ideas.

more...
No comment yet.