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LocalSprout: Inside an Urban Farm on San Antonio's Eastside | The Rivard Report

LocalSprout: Inside an Urban Farm on San Antonio's Eastside | The Rivard Report | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Rackspace co-founder Pat Condon and recent Trinity graduate Mitchell Hagney had just made a delivery of freshly grown leafy greens to One Lucky Duck juice bar at the Pearl and ...

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Organic Farming
There are many options out there to raising healthy food. Let's take a closer look.
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Cake Recipes: Rhubarb Pineapple Upside-Down Cake

4.7 / 5 Stars | 25 Reviews by Marne Not your typical rhubarb cake! The pineapple and marshmallows add a little twist! It ll be eaten up in a flash! View Complete Recipe Details and Reviews Allrecipes Daily Recipes for Desserts
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Rhubarb pineapple upside down cake?
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the Organic Review: Campbell’s Soup Being Sued for “Natural” Label, Uses GM Corn

the Organic Review: Campbell’s Soup Being Sued for “Natural” Label, Uses GM Corn | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Food labels are sometimes humorous to the health-conscious consumer but have ultimately shaped the way shoppers perceive various products, such as ‘diet soda’ for instance. Many shoppers view ‘diet...

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Scientists use people power to find disease-resistant ash trees

Scientists use people power to find disease-resistant ash trees | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Walkers and other members of the public will be asked to help create new generation of healthy plants
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Disease resistant ash tree? 
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What Works Well in Raised Beds (and What Doesn't) Part 1 : Dave's ...

What Works Well in Raised Beds (and What Doesn't) Part 1 : Dave's ... | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
I now have two years of experience growing vegetables in raised beds, so I am getting a handle on which vegetables grow very well in raised beds and which don't. I am using the Square Foot Gardening method promoted by ...

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What to grow in your raised beds?
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Dave Sands's curator insight, January 22, 2014 3:05 PM

The title tells all.

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How to Prepare for Economic Collapse: 14 Steps (with Pictures)
http://homesteadi...

How to Prepare for Economic Collapse: 14 Steps (with Pictures) http://homesteadingandprepping.com/links/how-to-prepare-for-economic-collapse-14-steps-with-pictures How to Prepare for Economic Collapse: 14 Steps (with Pictures)...

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Top Tips For Success With Clematis

Top Tips For Success With Clematis | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Looking for some top tips for success with clematis? Here is an Interview with with Clematis Expert – Ray Evison

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Clematis?
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MyGardenSchool's curator insight, February 8, 6:37 AM

Looking for some top tips for success with clematis? Here is an Interview with with Clematis Expert – Ray Evison

 

 

 
Richard Spencer's curator insight, February 8, 11:29 AM

Top  tips  from  the  Clematis  Expert  Ray  Evison  

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Making Your Garden Even Greener

Making Your Garden Even Greener | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
This post has been contributed by Diana Smith. In this era of GMO and junk food, a garden is probably the most valuable thing there is. Here, you can grow your own 100% organic fruit an

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I Went Vegan & Suffered From Anxiety, Candida Overgrowth, Acne & More. Here's Why

I Went Vegan & Suffered From Anxiety, Candida Overgrowth, Acne & More. Here's Why | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Like many experimental teens with Internet access, I found my way to the PETA website to learn a bit more about vegetarianism. Several videos and articles later, I decided to kick meat to the curb.

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NOAA: World's Worst Coral Bleaching Event to Continue 'With No Signs of Stopping'

NOAA: World's Worst Coral Bleaching Event to Continue 'With No Signs of Stopping' | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

NOAA predicts 2016 will be another year with significant coral bleaching. The Pacific islands's corals are likely to suffer from La Nina. The Great Barrier

The Pacific islands’s corals are likely to suffer from La Nina. NOAA predicts there’s a 75 percent chance La Nina will develop this year, bringing above normal water temperatures to the western Pacific.

NOAA said 2016 marks the third consecutive year with ocean water temperatures hotter than normal. This episode of coral bleaching began in mid-2014, making it “the longest and most widespread coral bleaching event on record.” 

During this period, the administration reported, 70 percent of U.S. coral reefs have been exposed to prolonged high temperatures that can cause bleaching. Ninety-three percent of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef was bleached as of this April. Coral bleaching in the world’s largest reef system could cause it to be a “dead ecosystem” in 20 years, EcoWatch reported previously. 

The largest coral atoll in the world, Kiritimati, has lost 80 percent of its coral in the past 10 months due to this coral bleaching event. Last month, Thailand announced it was closing 10 popular dive sites due to coral bleaching.



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Coral bleaching?
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, June 26, 10:31 PM
No signs of stopping!

"The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicts 2016 will be another year with significant coral bleaching; and scientists see no end in site.
“NOAA’s satellite and climate models provide us with the ability to track the high temperatures that are causing this bleaching and alert resource managers and scientists around the world,” C. Mark Eakin, NOAA’s Coral Reef Watch coordinator, said. “However, it is crucial that scientists and the public continue on site monitoring of reefs to track the actual extent and severity of the bleaching.”
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Non-Native Diets Are on the Rise as Countries Increasingly Rely on Foreign Crops

Non-Native Diets Are on the Rise as Countries Increasingly Rely on Foreign Crops | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
A new study has found that the proportion of non-native food crops in diets and agricultural systems has been steadily increasing over the past 50 years.

Via CIMMYT, Int.
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Fat is back! Shoppers opt for whole milk, Greek yogurt ("decrease diabetes, cardio disease, some cancers, etc.")

Fat is back! Shoppers opt for whole milk, Greek yogurt ("decrease diabetes, cardio disease, some cancers, etc.") | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Once taboo, full-fat milk can help consumers decrease risk of diabetes, heart disease, new studies find.

Once snubbed, whole-fat milk, yogurt and other dairy products are finding their way back into our refrigerators, thanks to a growing interest in "whole foods" diets and new evidence that full-fat dairy products can be good for us, experts say. 

The trend is showing up in milk sales, both nationally and in Des Moines, industry data show. Whole milk sales in Des Moines climbed 9.6 percent last year over 2014; nationally, they climbed 4.5 percent. 

At the same time, fat-free milk sales in Des Moines dropped 9.5 percent, and nationally, they shrank 12.3 percent, according to data provided by Dairy Management, a marketing group for the industry's 45,000 U.S. dairy farmers. 

Chicago analytics company IRI collects the data. Statewide sales information wasn't available.

"There is some research that's coming out that shows consumption of whole-fat dairy is decreasing risk of Type 2 diabetes, decreasing risk of cardiovascular disease, decreasing risk of certain kinds of cancer, and people who consume whole-fat dairy products are less obese,"

Researchers are exploring whether it's the "dairy itself or their eating pattern as a whole," Litchfield said. 

"People who consume dairy products also tend to have other healthy behaviors," she said. "They're less likely to be smokers, they're more likely to be active, and they're more likely to consume whole grains."


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Bert Guevara's curator insight, June 20, 2:37 AM
I stopped buying low-fat dairy products after I realized this and my health has improved.

"There is some research that's coming out that shows consumption of whole-fat dairy is decreasing risk of Type 2 diabetes, decreasing risk of cardiovascular disease, decreasing risk of certain kinds of cancer, and people who consume whole-fat dairy products are less obese,"
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Holy Guacamole! People In New Zealand Are Stealing Avocados ("low supply makes it very in-demand")

Holy Guacamole! People In New Zealand Are Stealing Avocados ("low supply makes it very in-demand") | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

As Sid Vicious once said, "You can't arrest me, I'm a guac-star." Or something like that.

In the interview, which can be heard below, Scoular elaborated on the cause of the problem: “In New Zealand, we don’t import avocados, and we’ve had a moderate supply of avocados in the last season and a big increase in demand.”

The going rate for the guacamole eggs is currently $4 to $6 New Zealand dollars ($2.80 to $4.20) each. That’s a pretty high price to pay for something you smush on toast, which explains the appeal of stealing them and selling them on the black market. 

New Zealand police are thinking the criminal — or criminals — are using the cloak of darkness to pluck avocados from trees. 

“They must have spent a few hours there taking fruit off the trees, loading them into his own car. We are not sure if he parked the car down the driveway or kept it on the side of the orchard,” Sergeant Aaron Fraser told Stuff.co.nz.

Despite all this madness, there is one thing thieves should know: The avocados they’re plucking aren’t ripe yet! 

The crops are immature this time of year, Fraser has said, and they aren’t expected to be ripe and ready until around September or October. Black market buyers: Beware of shoddy avocados! 

Our resident Kiwi in the office, who asked to remain anonymous, had this to say about avocados: “I enjoy them sometimes.”


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Bert Guevara's curator insight, June 24, 12:56 AM
Have you discovered the nutritional benefits of this super-fruit yet? Don't be left behind because of the myths that its oil is bad for your health.
It is selling at $2.80 to $4.20 per piece (not per kilo) in New Zealand. In the Philippines, I just bought them for P60/kg in Silang (Cavite) and P120/kg from the supermarket. Some supermarkets are selling them at P199/kg.
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Black Swamp Conservancy - Local Land Named "MVW"

Black Swamp Conservancy - Local Land Named "MVW" | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Black Swamp Conservancy’s Forrest Woods Nature Preserve was recently named the Society of Wetland Scientists first ever Most Valuable Wetland as part of their "Wetland Treasure" program. The program features and highlights wetlands that exhibit exemplary function and service.

Via Ohio Wetlands Association
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Wetland Treasure?
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Ohio Wetlands Association's curator insight, June 15, 6:53 AM
The new 'Wetland Treasures' program is an inspiration.
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New GMO Study Raises Health Concerns

New GMO Study Raises Health Concerns | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
A new study looking at pigs that eat genetically engineered (GE) versus non-GE feed suggests we could be overlooking health problems associated with using the unnatural gene technology in crops tha...

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This huge, ugly fruit is a surprisingly good meat substitute ("it's more than just a dessert")

This huge, ugly fruit is a surprisingly good meat substitute ("it's more than just a dessert") | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Don't know jack about replacing meat with fruit? Here's a helpful guide.

But there’s another option, one that happily satisfies both those who enjoy meat substitutes in any form and those who would rather not eat a highly processed meat imitation. That option is jackfruit: a large — enormous really — fruit found in tropical regions around the world that’s eaten both ripe and unripe. 

When it’s young and green, jackfruit works remarkably well as a natural stand-in for pork or chicken due to its meaty, shreddable texture after cooking. Ripe jackfruit is sweeter, and doesn’t work as a meat substitute, but can be eaten raw.

If you’re ready to try it yourself, you have options: fresh, canned, or packaged.

Look for fresh jackfruit in well-stocked grocery stores or international markets. If you find it sold in smaller chunks, you won’t have to try and wrestle with an entire child-sized fruit — at least this time anyway.

If you can’t find fresh jackfruit near you (or would just prefer not to go through the hassle of prepping it), you can find canned young jackfruit in Asian markets or online. Make sure to get the jackfruit packed in brine or water — not syrup! 

If you’re starting with fresh, green jackfruit or canned jackfruit, you’ll want to season it (it doesn’t have a strong flavor when unripe, which makes it a versatile ingredient) and cook it until the arils start to break down into shreds (often done by sautéing, stir-frying, or simmering in a sauce).


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Jack fruit for dessert?
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, June 29, 8:37 PM
This is an interesting discovery for those who want to look for a meat stand-in. I never expected the jackfruit to be more than just dessert. 

"But there’s another option, one that happily satisfies both those who enjoy meat substitutes in any form and those who would rather not eat a highly processed meat imitation. That option is jackfruit: a large — enormous really — fruit found in tropical regions around the world that’s eaten both ripe and unripe. 
"When it’s young and green, jackfruit works remarkably well as a natural stand-in for pork or chicken due to its meaty, shreddable texture after cooking. Ripe jackfruit is sweeter, and doesn’t work as a meat substitute, but can be eaten raw."
Marty Roddy's curator insight, June 30, 8:27 AM
This is cool #vegan fun, Does it ship well , for northern #vegetarian
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10 steps to building a smart city

10 steps to building a smart city | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
As urban areas swell around the world, leaders are seeking better ways to accommodate citizens. Experts from a recent livechat offer advice
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Stylish Raised Beds - Vegetable Gardener

Stylish Raised Beds - Vegetable Gardener | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
If you want more than the standard box, here's how to kick it up a notch.

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Carrion Beetle - Entomological Associates

Carrion Beetle - Entomological Associates | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
The Carrion Beetle is relatively large, rounded in form, and has a yellow pronotum with a black central spot. Learn more from Entomological Associates, a Blackwater Consulting Services company based in South Carolina.

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Organic Advice - library

Organic Advice - library | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Via Cindy Meredith
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Organics and  pollinators?
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Cindy Meredith's curator insight, June 24, 8:28 AM
Here is a terrific overview of the many pollinators that inhabit our gardens and landscapes... or would if we didn't use so many toxic products outdoors.
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Do's and Don'ts of Food Supplements

Do's and Don'ts of Food Supplements | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
This post has been contributed by Peter Minkoff.

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How your clothes are poisoning our oceans and food supply ("more bad news for ocean life & our food")

How your clothes are poisoning our oceans and food supply ("more bad news for ocean life & our food") | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

New studies show that alarming numbers of tiny fibers from synthetic clothing are making their way from your washing machine into aquatic animals

he first time professor Sherri Mason cut open a Great Lakes fish, she was alarmed at what she found. Synthetic fibers were everywhere. Under a microscope, they seemed to be “weaving themselves into the gastrointestinal tract”. Though she had been studying aquatic pollution around the Great Lakes for several years, Mason, who works for the State University of New York Fredonia, had never seen anything like it. 

New studies indicate that the fibers in our clothes could be poisoning our waterways and food chain on a massive scale. Microfibers – tiny threads shed from fabric – have been found in abundance on shorelines where waste water is released. 

Now researchers are trying to pinpoint where these plastic fibers are coming from.

In an alarming study released Monday, researchers at the University of California at Santa Barbara found that, on average, synthetic fleece jackets release 1.7 grams of microfibers each wash. It also found that older jackets shed almost twice as many fibers as new jackets. The study was funded by outdoor clothing manufacturer Patagonia, a certified B Corp that also offers grants for environmental work.

“These microfibers then travel to your local wastewater treatment plant, where up to 40% of them enter rivers, lakes and oceans,” according to findings published on the researchers’ website.


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Clothes poisoning oceans?
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, June 26, 11:42 AM
What are we dumping into our oceans that we may eat later? Not only plastics; now it's fiber!!!

"Rochman’s own recent study of seafood from California and Indonesia indicates that plastic fibers contaminate the food we eat. 
"Testing fish and shellfish from markets in both locations, Rochman determined that “all [human-made] debris recovered from fish in Indonesia was plastic, whereas [human-made] debris recovered from fish in the US was primarily fibers”."
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Ethiopian farmers need urgent assistance to feed country caught in major drought

Ethiopian farmers need urgent assistance to feed country caught in major drought | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Timely agricultural assistance for the upcoming rainy season is essential to help the drought-affected people of Ethiopia, as one of the strongest El Niño events on record continues to have devastating effects on the lives and livelihoods of farmers and herders.

Via CIMMYT, Int.
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Ethiopians in major drought.
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How To Make Healthy Choices As We Age

How To Make Healthy Choices As We Age | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
This  post has been  contributed by Laura.

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How Fast Food Messes With Your Hormones ("prefer home-cooked meals vs home delivered fast food")

How Fast Food Messes With Your Hormones ("prefer home-cooked meals vs home delivered fast food") | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

A new study shows people who eat fast food have higher levels of plastics chemicals, called phthalates, in their system

If you want to eat healthy, you’ll need to forgo fast food, which is high in sodium, sugar and grease. A new study supplies even more incentive to do so by finding that fast food is a source of chemicals called phthalates, which have been linked to a list of possible health burdens like hormone disruption and lower sperm count. 

The new report, published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, found that people who ate more fast food also had higher levels of two substances that occur when phthalates—which make plastic more flexible—break down in the body. “The same range of concentrations measured in this [group] overlaps with the range of concentrations that have been measured in some of epidemiological studies that find adverse health effects,” says study author Ami Zota, an assistant professor of environmental and occupational health at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health.

Prior studies have shown that diet is a source of exposure for plastics chemicals like phthalates and Bisphenol A (BPA), and that processed food may be of particular concern. The new study is the largest to look at exposure from fast food fare specifically.


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Fast food vs hormones?
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, June 21, 10:06 PM
It is always healthier to eat home-cooked meals. Do away with frequent "home deliveries" from fast-food chains; prepare your meals.

"If you want to eat healthy, you’ll need to forgo fast food, which is high in sodium, sugar and grease. A new study supplies even more incentive to do so by finding that fast food is a source of chemicals called phthalates, which have been linked to a list of possible health burdens like hormone disruption and lower sperm count."
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News

News | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
MAD Scientist Associates shares news updates regarding wetland, stream, and
ecological projects.  Community volunteer projects are highlighted as well
as awards and achievements.  Check here often for updated news items!

Via Ohio Wetlands Association
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MAD Scientists?
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Ohio Wetlands Association's curator insight, May 27, 6:46 AM
How do you celebrate Wetlands Month?