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Earth Day Network and ForestNation Launch New School Fundraiser | EDN Educators' Network

Earth Day Network and ForestNation Launch New School Fundraiser | EDN Educators' Network | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Why should students sell candy bars or wrapping paper for school fundraising when they could sell tree saplings instead? Earth Day Network and ForestNation have teamed up to change school fundraising for the better by encouraging students to sell tree-growing kits.

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GMO and Monsanto Roundup: Glyphosate Weedkiller in our Food and Water?

GMO and Monsanto Roundup: Glyphosate Weedkiller in our Food and Water? | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Historians may look back and write about how willing we are to sacrifice our children and jeopardize future generations with a massive experiment that is based on false promises and flawed science ...

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Caloric restriction increases monkey lifespan, benefits health

Caloric restriction increases monkey lifespan, benefits health | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Can the lifespan of an animal be increased by restricting their intake of calories? The question has been the subject of study for decades, primarily through two concurrent long-term experiments using rhesus monkeys. Interestingly, these two studies came to conflicting conclusions, but by comparing their results and accounting for other variables, scientists have now determined that the answer is yes – caloric restriction does help monkeys stay healthier and live longer.

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33 blood-cancer patients have dramatic clinical remission with new T-cell therapy | KurzweilAI

Chinese doctors have reported success with a new type of immunotherapy for multiple myeloma*, a blood cancer: 33 out of 35 patients in a clinical trial had clinical remission within two months.

The researchers used a type of T cell called “chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T.”** In a phase I clinical trial in China, the patient’s own T cells were collected, genetically reprogrammed in a lab, and injected back into the patient. The reprogramming involved inserting an artificially designed gene into the T-cell genome, which helped the genetically reprogrammed cells find and destroy cancer cells throughout the body.

The study was presented Monday (June 5, 2017) at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) conference in Chicago.

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A better way to predict environmental impacts of agricultural production | Stanford News

A better way to predict environmental impacts of agricultural production | Stanford News | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Scientists at Stanford, the University of Minnesota and Unilever have found a way to better predict and quantify environmental impacts.

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Monsanto attempt to block glyphosate from California cancer list tossed by judge

Monsanto attempt to block glyphosate from California cancer list tossed by judge | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
A California state court has dismissed a legal challenge by multinational agribusiness firm Monsanto that seeks to bar the state from adding glyphosate, the lead ingredient in the company's Roundup herbicide, to a list of cancer-causing chemicals.
On March 10, Fresno County Superior Court Judge Kristi Culver Kapetan ruled against Monsanto's challenge to a provision of Proposition 65, a California voter initiative passed in 1986 that requires the state's governor to publicize a list of chemicals known to cause cancer.

The California Office of Environmental Health Health Hazard Assessment proposed to add glyphosate to the Proposition 65 list after the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified the chemical as a probable human carcinogen in 2015.

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GMO 'superseeds' leading to 'superweeds'

  The approval by the U.S. Department of Agriculture this month for new soy and corn seeds by Dow Chemical is setting off another battle over genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

At issue is whether the extended use of GMOs is creating a new type of "superweed."

These weeds are developing resistance to herbicides, because the GMO seeds can tolerate greater use of certain herbicides and pesticides.

As more herbicides are sprayed, that's created stronger, herbicide resistant weeds on farmland, reportedly costing farmers a billion dollars in lost crops.

"It is a crisis situation," said Neil Harker, a weed ecologist at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. "We're losing the effectiveness of herbicide tools against weeds going forward."

"I'm in favor of GMOs, but they should be used judiciously," he said.

Others say the weed infestation is one more reason to avoid GMOs altogether.

"We don't need pesticide-resistant GMOs to control weeds. There are natural ways to fight them," said Bill Freese, a science policy expert at the Center for Food Safety.

"The GMO industry likes to put a warm fuzzy glow on GMOs but we don't see much use for them at all," he argued.

However, farmers like Bill Horan, who has 4,000 acres in northwest Iowa, believe GMO seeds are irreplaceable. "We've used GMO corn seeds for decades and they're a great product," said the 66-year-old Horan. "It's always a battle with weeds but with the new seeds, the pesticides work better," he said.

$1 billion in damages

The newest genetically modified corn and soybeans were developed by Dow AgroSciences, a division of Dow Chemical. They are to be sold under the brand Enlist Weed Control System.

The seeds can tolerate glyphosate, the world's most widely used herbicide, as well as the lesser used herbicide called 2,4-D.

While approved by the USDA on Sept. 17, the seeds still need the go-ahead from the Environmental Protection Agency for their herbicide-resistant formula. However, that approval is expected, according to experts, with the seeds going to market in 2015.

The infestation of superweeds has more than doubled since 2009, according to Dow Chemical, which also states that an estimated 70 million acres of U.S. farmland are infested with herbicide-tolerant weeds that cost roughly $1 billion in damages to crops so far.

In an email response to CNBC.com, a Dow spokesperson wrote: "We agree with our critics that with unvarying use of the same model of weed control action ... weeds will adapt. We differ from critics however, in that we believe the best way to promote responsible use of weed control technology is to provide growers with the broadest practicable range of weed control options."

Other companies making grains resistant to herbicides include Pioneer, Syngenta and Monsanto, the world's largest producer of GMOs.

Monsanto also makes the herbicide Roundup, whose chief ingredient is glyphosate.


"(Weed) resistance to herbicides existed prior to the introduction of genetically engineered seeds," wrote a Monsanto spokesperson in an email to CNBC.

"Monsanto has been working for many years with scientists and academics to educate growers on the need for multiple modes of action," the email said.

'More toxic' herbicides
Because the fight against weeds is hardly new, that's a reason to avoid putting all the blame on GMOs for the current infestation, said Justin Gardner, a professor of agribusiness at Middle Tennessee State University.

"What's going on is natural selection," Gardner said. "Weeds were resistant before GMOs. The best way around this is to use different weed killers instead of the same one all the time."

But the increased resistance by weeds to herbicides only highlights why GMOs are at fault, said Itzick Vatnick, a professor of biology, biochemistry and environmental science at Widener University.

Read MoreUnapproved GMO wheat find should not hurt U.S. exports

"With the introduction of GMOs engineered to resist glyphosate in the mid-1990s, genetic resistance of many weeds to it rose dramatically," he said.

"The problem is so severe that the agrochemcial companies are now poised to introduce herbicides that are more toxic," Vatnick argued.

Divide deepens

The superweed infestation is unlikely to end the debate over GMOs. If anything, it just deepens the divide, say analysts.

The companies that make GMOs vouch for their safety and continued use. Bill Horan sees them as life-changing.

"We don't have weeds anymore, so we can take time to do the little things like going to our kids' swim team lessons," said Horan, who's harvesting his 40th corn crop this year.

"We couldn't do that when I was growing up when we didn't have the GMOs," he said.


But the critics point to what they say is a continuing list of harmful effects.

The Center for Food Safety's Freese said increased herbicide use—because GMOs are more herbicide tolerant—are decimating the monarch butterfly population in the U.S.

Freese said it's decreased by 90 percent due to herbicides killing off the milkweed that is a natural habitat for the butterflies.

John Kempf, a farmer and CEO of Advancing Eco Agriculture, a soil nutrition consulting firm, said GMOs fail to match their claims.

"They don't increase crop yields and they increase the resistance of weeds to herbicides," he said. "We should use the science of nutrition for the soil instead of the science of GMOs." 


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Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact - Bonny (2015) - Env Management

Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact - Bonny (2015) - Env Management | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Genetically modified (GM) crops have been and continue to be a subject of controversy despite their rapid adoption by farmers where approved. For the last two decades, an important matter of debate has been their impact on pesticide use, particularly for herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Some claim that these crops bring about a decrease in herbicide use, while others claim the opposite...

 

The repetition of glyphosate-tolerant crops and of glyphosate only applications in the same fields without sufficient alternation and herbicide diversity has contributed to the appearance of glyphosate-resistant weeds. These weeds have resulted in a rise in the use of glyphosate and other herbicides. This article explores this situation and the impacts of herbicide-resistant weeds...

 

The paper analyzes the spread of GMHT crops worldwide and their consequences on herbicide use in the USA in particular. It then addresses the global development of glyphosate-resistant weeds and their impact, particularly focusing on the USA... The last section explores how industry, farmers, and weed scientists are coping with the spread of resistant weeds... 

 

In the last 20 years, almost all GM crops have been herbicide tolerant (HT) or insect resistant, and thus an important topic of debate has been their impact on pesticide use... Insect-resistant crops have generally led to a decrease of previously used insecticides, while the impact of HT crop varies and is more unclear.. 

 

For the last 15 years, a new factor has fueled the controversy: the development of weeds resistant to glyphosate... Since the 1950s when weedkillers began to be widely used, 245 herbicide-resistant (HR) weeds have appeared over the years and many weed species have developed resistance to different herbicides. Hence weed resistance is not a new phenomenon... 

 

However, GMHT crops are greatly affected by glyphosate-resistant (GR) weeds, due to the high predominance of glyphosate-tolerant [GT] crops since 1996. In addition, glyphosate is by far the most widely used herbicide, also widely applied on non-HT crops. Thus this paper focuses mainly on glyphosate. Although there are fewer weed species resistant to glyphosate today than there are species resistant to some other herbicides... 

 

The aim of this paper is thus to analyze in more depth the importance of glyphosate-resistant weeds in relation to GMHT crops, as well as their impact and the remedial measures that the involved stakeholders are implementing or looking for... 

 

The environmental impact of GT crops was often assessed as beneficial by a great number of papers, due to the fact that some rather noxious herbicides previously used were replaced by glyphosate. Indeed at that time, glyphosate was often considered to be rather benign. Another frequently mentioned benefit was the concomitant expansion of soil conservation practices, to which glyphosate-tolerant crops are well suited... 

 

As the trend in the amount of herbicide use is frequently not sufficient to evaluate the environmental impact, it is useful to take into account the health and environmental profiles of herbicides. This is, however, a complicated task... A certain number of articles have used the Environmental Impact Quotient (EIQ)... the EIQ was recently assessed as ‘‘a poor indicator of potential environmental risk of herbicides’’... Thus Kniss and Coburn (2015) call for better approaches... 

 

The rise in GR weeds has a broad impact, and glyphosate’s loss of efficacy is seen as having great repercussions in the areas growing many GT crops... Glyphosate is now often increasingly supplemented, and sometimes replaced, by other herbicides; however, these are frequently more harmful and difficult to use... Moreover, since 1997, the number of new active herbicide ingredients put onto the market has declined... Hence weed control may be more difficult to accomplish. This decrease in the marketing of new active ingredients is partly an outcome of the expansion of GT crops. Indeed, the market for herbicides other than glyphosate has grown smaller; at the same time, the number of agrochemical companies has decreased... 

 

Because of the high impact of herbicide-resistant weeds, weed scientists, crop advisors, and GM seed companies prompt farmers to adopt better weed management practices. In addition, the solution the involved companies put forward is to shift toward GM crops with tolerance trait to glyphosate (or another herbicide) stacked with one or two other HT traits such as tolerance to 2,4-D, Dicamba, glufosinate, etc. ... 

 

A number of farmers and weed scientists think that a new paradigm, a new way of tackling weed management and weed resistance to herbicides, is necessary. This would be, notably, integrated weed management (IWM)... that integrates different methods of weed control to provide the crop an advantage over weeds... combines the coordinated use of multiple techniques to reduce weed pressure, instead of putting the main emphasis on herbicides... 

 

IWM ‘‘provides opportunities to reduce selection pressure for
weed resistance’’. Among other aspects, IWM requires better knowledge on weeds, crops, and their interactions, preventive measures against weed infestation, early detection, rapid response, regular monitoring of weeds, and integrated use of several methods, such as crop rotation, cover crops and mulches, reduced tillage, precision agriculture, adequate seeding rates, seed quality, etc. ... 

 

The HT traits appears more lucrative at present... before the eventual launching and marketing of the next kinds of traits or innovations... dealing with food quality, drought tolerance, bioenergy, chemical, and polymers, which have often been presented as the next waves of agricultural biotechnology... Companies are also investing in other biotech applications and other lines of products, such as biopesticides, as well as tools for farmers to gather and analyze field-level data for precision farming. Thus HT crops may be still used for some time, while the next products or services are under development. 

 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00267-015-0589-7

 


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Maui Initiative to Ban GMO Crops Gets Enough Signatures for Ballot - Honolulu Civil Beat

Maui Initiative to Ban GMO Crops Gets Enough Signatures for Ballot - Honolulu Civil Beat | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Honolulu Civil Beat Maui Initiative to Ban GMO Crops Gets Enough Signatures for Ballot Honolulu Civil Beat A group of Maui County residents has collected enough valid signatures to put a temporary ban on genetically modified crops before voters...

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Why Home Remedies Are Best For Diabetes

Why Home Remedies Are Best For Diabetes | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Here is why home remedies are the best to treat diabtes. In this article we tell you more reasons as to why you need use home remedies for diabetes.

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How to feed the world sustainably: an overview of the discourse on agroecology and sustainable intensification

How to feed the world sustainably: an overview of the discourse on agroecology and sustainable intensification | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
In order to combat hunger and feed a growing world population, adapt to climate change and reduce environmental impacts of unsustainable farming practices, the need for a paradigm shift in agriculture

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Breakfast Is At Risk If We Don't Do Something About The Bees | Care2 Healthy Living

Breakfast Is At Risk If We Don't Do Something About The Bees | Care2 Healthy Living | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Bee populations are declining more rapidly than expected. Native bee species are at risk for extinction, and that it putting some of our greatest foods at risk.

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Did you know that without the pollination of crops by bees 70 out of 100 most consumed foods you enjoy will be gone from the food chain? The impact on human health could be huge. 

 

A study funded by the National science foundation found that essential minerals, such as calcium for the development of bones and teeth are found in crops produced by pollinators. 

 

The carotenoids found in bright colored pigmented orange, red, and yellow veggies and fruits which are associated with protection from cancer and macular degeneration are also pollinated by bees.

 

The researchers estimate that up to 40 percent of key nutrients found in veggies and fruits could be lost without the bee pollinators.

 

 Bees and other pollinators are experiencing declining numbers in recent years due to environmental pesticides, lack of floral resources, and Colony Collapse disorder.

 

Health tips:  Urge your local big box stores to stop selling bee killing pesticides such as Neonicotinoids. These pesticides, that have been shown to kill bees and other pollinators are now showing up in the Midwest in treated drinking water.

 

Another thing you can do is petition your Congressional legislators and Senators.

 

You could also stop consuming raw honey as this is food for the bees.

 

Read more about “Without Bees, You Can say Goodbye to These Breakfast foods” from www.care2.com by Jordyn Cormier.

 

This www.scoop.it/t/zestful-living site is being curated by Sandi Cornez. Follow Sandi for more healthy food/water tips @https://www.facebook.com/wisdomfromthewell

 

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A Year in The English Garden - Out now! - The English Garden

A Year in The English Garden - Out now! - The English Garden | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
In 2017 we launch our 1st annual edition, A Year in The English Garden, packed full of helpful tips and inspiration gardens to see you through the seasons.

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GM crops: Scientists form group to bring politicians on board

GM crops: Scientists form group  to bring politicians on board | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Stung by adverse political reactions on genetically modified crops, agriculture scientists have formed a 12-member pressure group comprising top scientists to brief ministers and other policy-makers on technology issues in an attempt to win over...

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Severe pollution ‘devastating’ China’s vital ecosystem, research study shows

Severe pollution ‘devastating’ China’s vital ecosystem, research study shows | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

The startling extent to which man-made pollution is devastating China’s vital ecosystem’s ability to offset damaging carbon emissions has been revealed.

 

The study found that the Net Primary Productivity (NPP) – or the amount of carbon plants in an ecosystem can take in – is significantly reduced when the amount of surface ozone increases. Crucially, this reduction is significantly greater than the effect aerosol particles have in encouraging plants to increase carbon intake through reducing canopy temperatures and increasing the scattering of light.

 

Professor Unger added: “Essentially, our results reveal a strong ‘dampening effect’ of air pollution on the land carbon uptake in China today. “This is significant for a number of reasons, not least because the increase in surface ozone produced by man-made pollution in the region will continue to grow over the next 15 years unless something is done. “If – and it is of course a big ‘if’ – China reduce their pollution to the maximum levels, we could reduce the amount of damage to the ecosystems by up to 70 per cent - offering protection of this critical ecosystem service and the mitigation of long-term global warming.”

 


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33 blood-cancer patients have dramatic clinical remission with new T-cell therapy | KurzweilAI

Chinese doctors have reported success with a new type of immunotherapy for multiple myeloma*, a blood cancer: 33 out of 35 patients in a clinical trial had clinical remission within two months.

The researchers used a type of T cell called “chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T.”** In a phase I clinical trial in China, the patient’s own T cells were collected, genetically reprogrammed in a lab, and injected back into the patient. The reprogramming involved inserting an artificially designed gene into the T-cell genome, which helped the genetically reprogrammed cells find and destroy cancer cells throughout the body.

The study was presented Monday (June 5, 2017) at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) conference in Chicago.

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Hemp Is God's Gift To Mankind

Hemp Is God's Gift To Mankind https://myclub8.com/home/?rep=6735 * Mike Adams is a food scientist running LC/MS instrumentation to examine organic compound

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How To Grow Red Amaranth - A Nutrition Powerhouse Superfood

How To Grow Red Amaranth - A Nutrition Powerhouse Superfood How To Grow Red Amaranth - A Nutrition Powerhouse Superfood How To Grow Red Amaranth -

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India: Genetic Engineering, the Commercialization of GM Mustard and the Future of Agriculture | Global Research - Centre for Research on Globalization

India: Genetic Engineering, the Commercialization of GM Mustard and the Future of Agriculture | Global Research - Centre for Research on Globalization | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
The importance of GM mustard should not be underestimated. It is central to the whole debate about the future of agriculture in India and the wider development paradigm. GM mustard is a Trojan horse that would help pave the way for ripping up the economic and social fabric of India and recast for the benefit of powerful Western corporations, not least Bayer-Monsanto (see GM Mustard in India to read my numerous articles on this issue).


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GMO 'superseeds' leading to 'superweeds'

  The approval by the U.S. Department of Agriculture this month for new soy and corn seeds by Dow Chemical is setting off another battle over genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

At issue is whether the extended use of GMOs is creating a new type of "superweed."

These weeds are developing resistance to herbicides, because the GMO seeds can tolerate greater use of certain herbicides and pesticides.

As more herbicides are sprayed, that's created stronger, herbicide resistant weeds on farmland, reportedly costing farmers a billion dollars in lost crops.

"It is a crisis situation," said Neil Harker, a weed ecologist at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. "We're losing the effectiveness of herbicide tools against weeds going forward."

"I'm in favor of GMOs, but they should be used judiciously," he said.

Others say the weed infestation is one more reason to avoid GMOs altogether.

"We don't need pesticide-resistant GMOs to control weeds. There are natural ways to fight them," said Bill Freese, a science policy expert at the Center for Food Safety.

"The GMO industry likes to put a warm fuzzy glow on GMOs but we don't see much use for them at all," he argued.

However, farmers like Bill Horan, who has 4,000 acres in northwest Iowa, believe GMO seeds are irreplaceable. "We've used GMO corn seeds for decades and they're a great product," said the 66-year-old Horan. "It's always a battle with weeds but with the new seeds, the pesticides work better," he said.

$1 billion in damages

The newest genetically modified corn and soybeans were developed by Dow AgroSciences, a division of Dow Chemical. They are to be sold under the brand Enlist Weed Control System.

The seeds can tolerate glyphosate, the world's most widely used herbicide, as well as the lesser used herbicide called 2,4-D.

While approved by the USDA on Sept. 17, the seeds still need the go-ahead from the Environmental Protection Agency for their herbicide-resistant formula. However, that approval is expected, according to experts, with the seeds going to market in 2015.

The infestation of superweeds has more than doubled since 2009, according to Dow Chemical, which also states that an estimated 70 million acres of U.S. farmland are infested with herbicide-tolerant weeds that cost roughly $1 billion in damages to crops so far.

In an email response to CNBC.com, a Dow spokesperson wrote: "We agree with our critics that with unvarying use of the same model of weed control action ... weeds will adapt. We differ from critics however, in that we believe the best way to promote responsible use of weed control technology is to provide growers with the broadest practicable range of weed control options."

Other companies making grains resistant to herbicides include Pioneer, Syngenta and Monsanto, the world's largest producer of GMOs.

Monsanto also makes the herbicide Roundup, whose chief ingredient is glyphosate.


"(Weed) resistance to herbicides existed prior to the introduction of genetically engineered seeds," wrote a Monsanto spokesperson in an email to CNBC.

"Monsanto has been working for many years with scientists and academics to educate growers on the need for multiple modes of action," the email said.

'More toxic' herbicides
Because the fight against weeds is hardly new, that's a reason to avoid putting all the blame on GMOs for the current infestation, said Justin Gardner, a professor of agribusiness at Middle Tennessee State University.

"What's going on is natural selection," Gardner said. "Weeds were resistant before GMOs. The best way around this is to use different weed killers instead of the same one all the time."

But the increased resistance by weeds to herbicides only highlights why GMOs are at fault, said Itzick Vatnick, a professor of biology, biochemistry and environmental science at Widener University.

Read MoreUnapproved GMO wheat find should not hurt U.S. exports

"With the introduction of GMOs engineered to resist glyphosate in the mid-1990s, genetic resistance of many weeds to it rose dramatically," he said.

"The problem is so severe that the agrochemcial companies are now poised to introduce herbicides that are more toxic," Vatnick argued.

Divide deepens

The superweed infestation is unlikely to end the debate over GMOs. If anything, it just deepens the divide, say analysts.

The companies that make GMOs vouch for their safety and continued use. Bill Horan sees them as life-changing.

"We don't have weeds anymore, so we can take time to do the little things like going to our kids' swim team lessons," said Horan, who's harvesting his 40th corn crop this year.

"We couldn't do that when I was growing up when we didn't have the GMOs," he said.


But the critics point to what they say is a continuing list of harmful effects.

The Center for Food Safety's Freese said increased herbicide use—because GMOs are more herbicide tolerant—are decimating the monarch butterfly population in the U.S.

Freese said it's decreased by 90 percent due to herbicides killing off the milkweed that is a natural habitat for the butterflies.

John Kempf, a farmer and CEO of Advancing Eco Agriculture, a soil nutrition consulting firm, said GMOs fail to match their claims.

"They don't increase crop yields and they increase the resistance of weeds to herbicides," he said. "We should use the science of nutrition for the soil instead of the science of GMOs." 


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American Scientists Confirm: Pesticides Are Killing Honey Bees

American Scientists Confirm: Pesticides Are Killing Honey Bees | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
The disappearance of honey bees in the United States is a phenomenon that has many people asking questions. What exactly is going on?

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Maui county clerk advances anti-GMO petition - Hawaii News - Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Maui county clerk advances anti-GMO petition - Hawaii News - Honolulu Star-Advertiser | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Breaking - Hawaii's news leader for Hawaii news. Honolulu Star-Advertiser provides up to the minute breaking news in Honolulu, Hawaii. With expanded photo coverage of Hawaii sports, entertainment, nightlife and insightful business news coverage.

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Foodopoly: The Battle Over the Future of Food and Farming in America from Monsanto to Wal-Mart

Foodopoly: The Battle Over the Future of Food and Farming in America from Monsanto to Wal-Mart | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Wenonah Hauter, the executive director of Food & Water Watch, joins us to discuss her new book, "Foodopoly: The Battle Over the Future of Food and Farming in America." Hauter tackles the corporations behind the meat, vegetables, grains and milk...

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Dr. Mercola's Essential 3 Supplements

Dr. Mercola's Essential 3 Supplements | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
And so it is a team effort you need to take the best control of your health.


There would be a missing nutritional element in the overall team effort required to help improve your health.

And speaking of nutrition, you know I've been very outspoken about excessive use of supplements in your diet. However, I've come to realize there are certain high-quality supplements that can work together as a team to complement a healthy diet and boost your overall health.

Now many people have asked me about the supplements I personally take.

And my colleagues at the Natural Heath Center have also been asked many times to identify the top supplements they would recommend. If they could recommend their top choices to optimize your health, what would they be?

Therefore, I decided to not only make my personal supplement formula available to you, I also want to offer the formula to you in a couple of convenient money-saving packages.

Who doesn't want to save money and add more convenience to their life?

Are you ready to learn how my supplement “team” formula works together to help you take better control of your health?

Okay, let's get starte

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3 supplements?
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Rescooped by Eric Larson from Monsanto: Cultivator of Deciet
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Repeal of Monsanto Protection Act Blocked From a Vote

Two senators took to the floor Thursday to oppose the Monsanto Protection Act rider to the farm bill. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) and Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) have introduced an amendment to the farm bill that would repeal the provision. Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) blocked the vote on the amendment and the Senate voted to end the debate on the Monsanto Protection Act


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The Fascinating Origins of 12 Beautiful Flower Names

The Fascinating Origins of 12 Beautiful Flower Names | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Test your knowledge with amazing and interesting facts, trivia, quizzes, and brain teaser games on MentalFloss.com.

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What's in a name?
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