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It is official: NOTHING is KNOWN about HIV/AIDS

It is official: NOTHING is KNOWN about HIV/AIDS | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

The mainstream literature reveals quite clearly that essentially nothing is known or understood about “HIV” or about “AIDS”; but to appreciate these revelations one must be prepared sometimes to read more or less between the lines.

A fine opportunity for that was provided by the recent 20th International AIDS Conference. The lack of knowledge is not admitted overtly but it clearly underlies what the HIV/AIDS protagonists regard as grist for further research funding.


When will there be a cure?


“‘We have plenty of data telling us we can make progress,’ said Françoise Barré-Sinoussi . . . . But she’s not foolish enough to give a timetable. She recalled predictions in the mid-1980s that a vaccine would be relatively simple to design. As of now, of course, there is still no vaccine even close to clinical availability.”


30 years of promises, announced breakthroughs later retracted, and other “progress” haven’t gotten anywhere.



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Not entirely true......

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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, July 27, 2014 4:24 PM

AIDS is a manufactured disease. The (retro)virus that supposedly causes it can't hardly be found and it isn't active either. No mechanism of disease causation, and of course no cure. Just treatment ... with toxic medicine.

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Social Networking and Twitter in Medical Education

Discuss, Develop and Demonstrate strategies for leveraging social media networking sites (twitter) for dissemination of scholarly work and medical education …

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The Potentially Dangerous Intersection of Healthcare and Social Media

The Potentially Dangerous Intersection of Healthcare and Social Media | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

Lately, there have been numerous reports in the media raising patient privacy concerns due to healthcare providers’ use of social media in the workplace.  A few examples include:

An ER nurse posting to Instagram a photo of a bloodied trauma room taken just after treating a patient who had been hit by a subway train – causing the hospital to take action against the nurse and terminate her employment;A young St. Louis obstetrician who took to Facebook to air complaints about a chronically tardy patient, who had suffered a stillbirth – which was reposted and drew hundreds of angry comments and led to a reprimand of the physician by the hospital where she worked;A Northwestern University physician posting photos of a student admitted to a Chicago hospital for extreme intoxication – leading to a $1 million lawsuit for invasion of privacy and infliction of emotional distress;A Chicago ER nurse sharing information on Twitter about a gunshot patient, including insulting tweets and a photo of the bloodied trauma room where the medical staff tried to save him – leading to a lawsuit against the nurse and the hospital for negligence and emotional distress seeking more than $100,000;Reports of abuse of elderly residents of nursing homes and senior care facilities in California, Colorado and Iowa, including the posting of nude and other humiliating photos to Facebook, Instagram and Shapchat – leading to termination, license suspension, and even criminal prosecution.

Screenshot of a bloody trauma room posted to social media
via NY Med

These and other examples demonstrate that patients, employers, regulators and even law makers and law enforcement are taking very seriously these new types of privacy concerns spawned by emerging and evolving social media platforms, and they are becoming more aggressive in pursing such cases.  Some employers and industry groups are undertaking efforts to revamp internal policies and procedures and training methods to address issues unique to the ever-changing landscape of social media technology.  There is no way to tell what the future might bring in terms of patient privacy issues and social media, but it seems likely that these challenges will continue to plague the healthcare industry.


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Digital Marketing in Healthcare Industry: A Complete Guide

Digital Marketing in Healthcare Industry: A Complete Guide | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

There has been a visible transformation in the healthcare industry that creates both opportunities and challenges for marketers. There are two variables which drive this transition. One is the rise of the digitally empowered healthcare consumer and the other is the shift from a fee for service payment to a healthcare delivery model on the basis of patient satisfaction, quality outcomes, and transparency.

It affects both the ‘who’ and ‘how’ of marketing strategies in the medical industry. Therefore, there has been a transformation in the role of physicians as decision-makers.

There are five key trends that should be considered by every healthcare marketer:

1. CONSUMERS ARE NOW AVID RESEARCHERS

Today, the consumers are no longer satisfied to blindly accept what a doctor tells them. They prefer doing homework before visiting a doctor. This means that the doctor n longer has the only say on medications, hospitals, treatment, and more. Healthcare is more like the collaboration between the doctors and consumers.

2. HEALTHCARE MARKETERS TO TARGET PAYERS AND CONSUMERS

For healthcare marketers, there are different audiences. This segment is the primary ‘who’ on the basis of the product or service being offered. Not so surprisingly, doctors are the primary marketing target. And why not? They still recommend, prescribe, advocate, and buy products and services. However, doctor decision-making is gradually shrinking as decision-making shifts to healthcare consumers and payers. Therefore, the emerging trend is that healthcare marketers need to increasingly target payers and consumers.

3. DIGITAL CHANNELS OVERSHADOWING TRADITIONAL MARKETING

While digital marketing is infusing in almost every sector, the healthcare industry is one of them. The last couple of years has seen a huge jump in the preference of digital marketing over traditional marketing in the healthcare. According to MM&M study, the greatest growth for the biotech, medical, diagnostics, and pharmaceutical device marketing budgets is taking place in digital sales material, mobile apps, and social media. Since consumer marketing tricks are shifting greatly to digital ads, social media, and mobile apps, therefore, the shift to digital channels in the healthcare industry is no wonder.

4. SOME INSIGHTS BY THINK WITH GOOGLE’S ‘THE DIGITAL JOURNEY TO WELLNESS: HOSPITAL SELECTION’Search engines are used by 77% of the patients before booking appointments.Search drives nearly 3 times as many visitors to hospital sites as compared to the number of visitors from other affiliate/referral sites.44% of patients schedule an appointment who research hospitals on a mobile device.The decision process is empowered by digital content.

Before booking an appointment –

77% of patients use search.26% used reviews generated by consumers.50% used health information sites.54% of the patients used health insurance company sites.83% used hospital sites.5. GROWTH RATE OF INDIAN HEALTHCARE INDUSTRY

As per the predictions of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu India, the Indian healthcare market which is currently worth of US $100 billion will grow at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 23% to hit US $280 billion by 2020. This is due to increase in adoption of digital techniques. Seeing these growth trends in India, Google Health card offers health services in India

Also, the Healthcare Information Technology (IT) market which is currently valued at US $1 billion will grow 1.5 times more by 2020.


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On a changing social media landscape for researchers

On a changing social media landscape for researchers | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

Many Stanford researchers are social media savvy. They tweet with ease about the latest happenings in their field, pen blog posts or carefully monitor their LinkedIn pages. Others — both here and elsewhere — lack the time, or the interest, to cultivate their social media skills.

But increasingly, scientists are benefiting from promoting their own research on social platforms, according to a recent article in Nature. The piece quotes Matt Shipman, a communications specialist at North Carolina State University:

Each researcher must make a personal choice about how much time to spend promoting their work on social media. But judicious use of self-promotion, says Shipman, leads to visibility, which in turn can lead to increased citations and attract talented graduate students and postdocs to the lab. Yet scientists cannot simply flit in and out of the social-media landscape and hope to make a significant impact, Shipman adds. ‘Like any other relationship, it takes time and effort to build and sustain an online network.’

The piece also delves into the workings of Kudos, a site created in 2014 — and free to researchers — that offers scientists a one-stop shop for social media, giving each paper an easy-to-read summary and providing analytic features. From the article:

“With so much more research being undertaken and published, the current system of dissemination can no longer guarantee that your work will find its audience,” says [co-founder Charlie Rapple]. Kudos, she says, aims “to make research more discoverable” and to “help researchers get more credit for what they do and achieve more with their work”.

Some of the services Kudos provides are available elsewhere, notes Greg Tananbaum, who owns the California-based ScholarNext consultancy and focuses on scholarly communication and academic technology issues. But integrating them into one site is unique, he says. In particular, Kudos makes it easier for mid-to-late-career academics, who often are wary of social media, to engage on those platforms and measure the impact of that activity. ‘Creating a mechanism that makes it easier to onboard them into that world, is novel,’ he says.

So, scientists, dive on in. My advice? Be shrewd, confident, clever and a bit humble.


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From plate to podium: what does it take to fuel Olympic athletes?

From plate to podium: what does it take to fuel Olympic athletes? | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it
We all know that competing at the Olympics is the end product of years of training, but how much fuel do elite athletes need?

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Why Your Healthcare Practice Needs a Mobile Site

Why Your Healthcare Practice Needs a Mobile Site | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

If you’ve been researching new trends to add to your healthcare marketing plan, you’ve probably noticed that one of the biggest trends for 2016 is creating a mobile site for your practice. Mobile sites are an essential healthcare marketing strategy for 2016 and beyond, and they should be an important part of any marketing plan. Here’s why:

More People Using Mobile Devices

Did you know that the total number of searches on mobile devices has increased 43% year after year? It’s a trend that’s not going away and is only going to increase. Creating an effective mobile site now will help you ensure that your marketing plans are aligned with current trends, so you can increase your practice’s profile. Not only that, but you also want to ensure that you’re meeting your audience’s wants and needs.

More Conversions

Four out of five consumers use their smartphones to shop. Having a mobile site is great, but if it’s not optimized for proper use, you could be missing out on potential new patients. Be sure to make it easy for your audience to make an appointment on your mobile site so you can harness those potential patients who are visiting your mobile site.

Reduce Bounce Rate

Having a site specifically designed for mobile users will also help reduce your bounce rate. Your regular website won’t load as well on a smartphone, so users are likely to leave if it takes too long to load or is unreadable. A specially designed mobile site that can load quickly will ensure that your audience stays with you long enough to become a potential patient.


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How exercise lowers cancer risk

How exercise lowers cancer risk | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it
For decades, health researchers across the world have known that athletes enjoy a significantly lower risk of cancer than the rest of us. - New Zealand Herald

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Mobile devices, social media may improve emergency heart, stroke care -

Mobile devices, social media may improve emergency heart, stroke care - | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

Mobile devices, social media, visual media and crowdsourcing have potential to improve emergency care for cardiac arrest, heart attack and stroke, according to a new scientific statement.

The statement, published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, is based on studies that evaluated the effectiveness of digital strategies in emergency cardiac and stroke care.

“Digital platforms can support existing efforts to educate people about what to do in an emergency,” said Raina Merchant, M.D., M.S.H.P., co-author of the statement and director of the Social Media Lab at the Penn Medicine Center for Health Care Innovation in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

“Learning what to do — including how to perform CPR and recognizing the symptoms of stroke — is something many people can do that can save lives.”

Positive results of digital strategies include a Swedish study in which 62 percent of people alerted to use a mobile phone application within 500 meters of a cardiac arrest victim started CPR, while only 48 percent of bystanders without the app started CPR.

In a Japanese study, emergency department personnel who sent pictures of 12-lead ECGs via their smartphone instead of fax to interventional cardiologists shaved 1.5 minutes off the time clinicians needed to diagnose a patient.

Smartphone apps to view brain images for stroke and Face Time videoconferencing apps to assess stroke patients by a remote neurologist may also be feasible, the statement authors said. But more evidence of the effectiveness of using the tools is needed.

To date, no research has shown negative results of using digital tools for emergency cardiac or stroke care. But the authors said unintended consequences to patients due to inaccurate information provided via digital tools could lead to medical errors, higher costs and disclosing patients’ health information in violation of federal privacy law.

“As many of these interventions are new and emerging, it is an optimal time to conduct rigorous evaluations just as are done for traditional medical therapies and interventions,” Merchant said.


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The Internet of Medical Things

The Internet of Medical Things | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

Manufacturers are eager to lay the bricks and help pave the road to better, more personalized healthcare through integration of connected devices in the new Internet of Medical Things. Compared to other industries, healthcare has been "inherently conservative and slow" to embrace innovations such as the cloud and the Internet of Things -- but that's changing.

 

Innovative tech products and services are making it harder for healthcare providers to ignore the potential benefits of connected medical devices and the IoMT

 

read more at http://www.technewsworld.com/story/The-Internet-of-Medical-Things-Part-1-A-New-Concept-in-Healthcare-83654.html

 


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Mobile Technology Increases Patient Engagement

Mobile Technology Increases Patient Engagement | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

More than 60% of smartphone users used their mobile device to search for information about a health condition, according to Pew Research Center. The analysts at eMarketer have forecast that pharma digital ad spending will rise to $2.55 billion by 2019.


This growing evolution in digital applications to monitor and improve health sets the foundation for new strategies in pharma marketing. Both physicians and patients are heavy users of mobile, and a new challenge arises when the industry shifts its focus to messaging targeting patients. Marketers now need to learn how to create a meaningful digital experience for patient-consumers.

 

The growth in mobile investment within the industry is real. For example, half of Takeda’s Web traffic last year came from smartphones and tablets, which is why the drug maker is optimizing mobile for both patients and physicians in its marketing campaigns.

 

The real opportunities don’t lie in simply providing informational material — the app version of brochureware — but in finding simple ways to improve adherence and outcomes, When mHealth apps are paired with traditional treatments, this becomes possible.

 

The industry needs to act on the opportunity to be in the pockets of its consumers

 

read more at http://www.pharmavoice.com/article/2016-06-mobile-technology/

 


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mHealth Study: Remote Monitoring Cuts Costs, Hospitalizations

mHealth Study: Remote Monitoring Cuts Costs, Hospitalizations | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it
mHealth Study: Remote Monitoring Cuts Costs, Hospitalizations

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Part II: Identifying Social Media Goals for Health Advocacy

Part II: Identifying Social Media Goals for Health Advocacy | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

t me make this clear first. I’m not a social media marketer. I’m a healthcare professional with the passion for healthcare social media.  As a healthcare professional, I want to improve healthcare in the Philippines. This is where social media fit in for me. I use social media to empower healthcare stakeholders. I’m making healthcare, social in the Philippines.

Some of the concepts I’m using in this talk are straight out from social media marketers guidebook. I know these concepts sound  strange to people in the healthcare industry. Indulge me to borrow some terms from the marketers guidebook, if only to elucidate and achieve my goal for this talk- align social media strategy to advocacy goals and measure social media success. I promise to only give you the most basic and practical concept to guide you on formulating your advocacy’s social media strategy.

Here are the steps:

Identifying social media goals and aligning this with your advocacy goals.Deciding your niches or target population.Determining what metrics to use to measure your social media success.Deciding on what social media tools to use in achieving your goals.Determining tools to monitor social media success.

Social Media Goals

Social media goals can be categorize into three broad categories.  Brand awareness, lead generation and customer retention are social media goals that can be can be aligned with any advocacy goals. Brand awareness is aimed at generating more exposure for your brand/advocacy. The aim is more people recognizing your advocacy. Lead generation is about finding more advocates and opportunities for your advocacy. Its about getting converts to your advocacy. Customer retention is about keeping your present clients/advocates coming back for more. You can use social media to accomplish all these goals but it is difficult to do all three unless you have a large advocacy campaign budget.  My recommendation is to pick one goal to focus in the meantime. Usually achieving one goal leads to another.  Pick one that you know could demonstrate early success for your group and show this to your advocacy leaders. “Success”will encourage leaders to pour logistics to your social media campaigns.

So how do you choose which one social media goal fits your advocacy? Let’s do the following activities:

In the first activity, plot your existing social  media strategy inside any of the three circles of social media goals where you think it belongs. If you don’t have one yet, don’t worry. The next activity will help you build one . Note that any strategy may be placed in between circles if they fall for both or all of the three categories.

SOCIAL MEDIA GOALS CIRCLE

The endpoint is to select one goal as your primary goal for social media. Also note that it is important to start with a goal that could potentially demonstrate early success.

The next activity is to do a SWOT analysis of each of your advocacy’s  goals. Remember advocacy goals might be different from your advocacy goals

SWOT ANALYSIS

Look at the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats to all of these three goals. Prioritise your goals based on potential for short or long term success. Then, examine which of these goals would social media make an impact or demonstrate early success. This is basically how to align social media strategy with your advocacy goals

In the next activity we will further break down these social media goals/strategy in a funnel to add value to our advocacy.


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Can exercise cure depression and anxiety?

Can exercise cure depression and anxiety? | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it
A study shows that being active increases brain chemicals linked to mental health.

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Supervising healthcare services with social media

Supervising healthcare services with social media | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

ocial media has become mainstream and a growing number of people use it to share health care-related experiences, for example on health care rating sites. These users’ experiences and ratings on social media seem to be associated with quality of care. Therefore, information shared by citizens on social media could be of additional value for supervising the quality and safety of health care services by regulatory bodies, thereby stimulating participation by consumers.

 
 
OBJECTIVE

In this study, we focused on the added value of social media for two types of supervision by the Dutch Healthcare Inspectorate (DHI), which is the regulatory body charged with supervising the quality and safety of health care services in the Netherlands. These were (1) supervision in response to incidents reported by individuals, and (2) risk-based supervision.

 
 
METHODS

We performed an exploratory study in cooperation with the DHI and searched different social media sources such as Twitter, Facebook, and healthcare rating sites to find additional information for these incidents and topics, from five different sectors. Supervision experts determined the added value for each individual result found, making use of pre-developed scales. Our searches resulted in relevant information for six of 40 incidents studied and provided relevant additional information in 72 of 116 cases in risk-based supervision of long-term elderly care.

 
 
RESULTS

The results showed that social media could be used to include the patient’s perspective in supervision. However, it appeared that the rating site ZorgkaartNederland was the only source that provided information that was of additional value for the DHI. while other sources such as forums and social networks like Twitter and Facebook did not result in additional information. This information could be of importance for health care inspectorates, particularly for its enforcement by risk-based supervision in care of the elderly. Further research is needed to determine the added value for other health care sectors.

 
 
CONCLUSIONS

This study shows that social media could be used to supervise healthcare services and better include the patient’s perspective in supervision. Interestingly, the Dutch rating site ZorgkaartNederland was the only source that provided relevant information.


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Extreme heat isn’t necessary for heatstroke, as this athlete’s harrowing story shows

Extreme heat isn’t necessary for heatstroke, as this athlete’s harrowing story shows | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it
Know the warning signs, and learn how to help someone in trouble.

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Why Snapchat Can And Should Be The Next Big Movement In Healthcare Marketing Features Medical Professionals

Why Snapchat Can And Should Be The Next Big Movement In Healthcare Marketing Features Medical Professionals | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

Social media is both a blessing and a curse for people around the world. With the majority of people posting pictures of their food, workouts, and statuses about their day, it seems like hardly anything is left to the imagination. Even if your profile is set to “private”, there are numerous ways for employers, exes, and random strangers to gain access to your content.

In the marketing world, however, social media represents an entirely new way to reach potential customers.

With the ability to reach billions of followers around the world each day, businesses are using social media to promote specials, attract followers, and expand the reach of their product. Right now, the up and coming new social media platform is Snapchat.

Created in 2011, Snapchat is a mobile messaging app where users send photos and videos to each other that self-destruct after a few seconds. Within the last year, Snapchat’s daily video views grew from 2 billion to 10 billion, according to Bloomberg Technology News. 

Businesses around the world are jumping on Snapchat’s new found popularity. Last December, the NFL became Snapchat’s first sports partner. Even The White House has a Snapchat account. Other statistics about this burgeoning company can be viewed in this article. 

Despite the growing popularity of this social media platform, it seems the healthcare industry is slow to utilize Snapchat as a marketing strategy. Of course HIPAA laws must be taken into consideration when using social media in regards to healthcare, but there are multiple, creative ways for the healthcare industry to use Snapchat.  

For instance, healthcare professionals can create Snapchat stories, a feature which allows the user to string together multiple snaps and create a video narrative that is available for users to view for 24 hours. This feature could be used to highlight a “Day in the Life of [insert medical professional here].”

Additionally, incorporating overlays, graphics or text that can be added on top of a photo, creates snaps which promote awareness for a certain disease or illness. For example, pink text overlay could be used during Breast Cancer Awareness Month. 

The reason Snapchat works so well in marketing is its simplicity and ability to create a sense of intimacy in a short amount of time. In a world where understanding healthcare is becoming more complicated and the digital world is making us feel more connected yet disconnected at the same time, Snapchat offers the ability to send quick, simple messages that still feel heartfelt.

Given that healthcare is now looked at by the general population as a consumer market, Snapchat may be underestimated as one of the best tools available for healthcare providers to create trust and comfort in patients and convey health information to the public.

.


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France's National Health Agency Calls for Reducing Children's Wireless Exposures

France's National Health Agency Calls for Reducing Children's Wireless Exposures | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

On July 8, the French National Agency of Health Security of Food, Environment and Labour (ANSES) published a new scientific report "Radiofrequency Exposure and the Health of Children".

Concluding that children are more vulnerable to radio frequency (RF) wireless exposures, the French report recommends immediately reducing exposures to wireless radiation from all wireless devices for young children.

 

Acknowledging the inadequacies of current outdated RF regulations, ANSES recommends strengthening RF exposure limits with child protective safety margins and developing more sophisticated premarket test methods to fully assess human exposures to RF radiation from wireless devices.

 

The new report has made headlines across the country.


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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, August 13, 1:52 PM

Time to cut down on exposure to wireless and mobile phone radiation? I don't mean only children but us as well!

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Why Hospitals Need to Embrace Digital and Social to Enhance Patient Engagement

Why Hospitals Need to Embrace Digital and Social to Enhance Patient Engagement | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

Recently, I injured my arm during a soccer match and had to have surgery. My experience with the hospital was mixed. Is it just me or do you too feel that patient engagement could still be a higher priority on many healthcare providers’ agenda?

While it was nice to only fill out my personal information once in the digital healthcare passport used by the surgery center, I was surprised to find that I was unable to schedule any appointments online — I had to call in — and my MRI was put onto a DVD that I was asked to keep track of instead of being stored in the cloud, which would have made it more accessible for me, my insurance company, my hospital and physician. I was also disappointed that the clinic didn't follow up with me post-surgery as expected, and didn’t email information about post-op steps. I don’t know about all of you, but generally after the fog of the anesthesia and pain wears off, I have a tough time recalling specific directions and advice.

I also found places where my paperwork and post-op directions didn’t match, as my follow up appointment turned out to be on a different day and time than the paperwork stated. I would have been happy to say some really positive things about the staff and care provided immediately before and after the surgery, should they have provided a link to share my experience with people having gone through a similar procedure. Instead, it’s mainly my family and friends on Facebook who know about my surgery and that I am now unable to do anything without my wife’s help.

Just a few years ago, I wouldn't have expected anything. But the convenience I now experience by booking travel via mobile, making my banking transactions from my laptop or reading restaurant reviews before planning a night out has raised my expectations from all service providers, including my insurer, car mechanic and doctor.

Blame it on digital and the digital disruptors using innovative techniques to deliver new levels of customer delight.

Retail, travel, hospitality, manufacturing and financial services are successfully using the powerful potential of digital and are using social media to effectively communicate with consumers, build brand awareness and engage with employees and partners. 74 percent of consumers now rely on social media to inform purchasing decisions, 51 percent of mobile phone owners in the U.S. will access banking services on their mobile phones in 2016 and 41 percent of consumers say social media affects their choice of a specific doctor, hospital or medical facility.

Despite these compelling statistics, a lot of untapped potential remains in the healthcare market. A Dell Services and UBM Tech study cites 53 percent of healthcare providers as having some presence in social media, but these same providers admit that they’re not particularly active in engaging with their target audience. Only 17 percent of those surveyed felt their organization’s efforts were very effective, and 67 percent said they had room for improvement or were not doing a good job in this space.

Healthcare providers can no longer afford to delegate social or digital initiatives as a nice-to-have program in their marketing campaigns, but instead need to take action to integrate it in their patient engagement strategy and adopt customer engagement practices from other industries.

There are many opportunities where healthcare providers can use social media listening and insights services to create value. Today, social media command centers help the American Red Cross identify critical needs in disaster-affected areas, which in turn increases the organization’s ability to quickly connect people with the resources they need during a disaster — such as food, water, shelter or even emotional support. Other opportunities to create value include:

Patient communication: providers can send alerts and reminders to patients via social channels and communicate personalized advice to improve quality of careCondition communities: caregivers and patients with similar conditions can connect via private and/or sponsored online social communitiesOperational insights: providers can listen for trends in patient comments to address the most significant problems before they escalatePatient sentiment: organizations can gather feedback via social channels on providers within a network and respond to influence patient sentiment and address systemic issuesHealth trends: providers can listen in on social channels to identify emerging seasonal health issues and respond to patient needs

There are some healthcare providers who have begun to cast their nets into the larger digital spectrum and explore the potential of analytics, customer relationship management (CRM), mobile and other channels to increase patient understanding and engagement. An example of this is our Patient360 solution that brings together social, mobile and analytics to provide a 360 degree view of the patient to generate meaningful insights. With the help of Single Score, a component of Patient360, we helped a healthcare provider build more effective marketing initiatives that indicate the likelihood of patients to respond to certain marketing campaigns and join particular patient affinity groups, thus helping them provide a better and more enriched experience.

I will be discussing some of the success factors and challenges to enabling patient engagement in the digital age in an upcoming webinar, Patient Engagement: Strategies for Improving Outcomes and Experience While Lowering Costs, along with a senior analyst from the Everest Group and Stephanie Bartels, Patient Engagement Solutions Leader for Dell Services. I hope you can join us and hope my own provider will be listening in too!


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'Virtual doctors' helping patients in Zambia 

'Virtual doctors' helping patients in Zambia  | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

The idea of a "virtual doctor" project might sound rather futuristic.

 

Zambia has about 1,600 doctors for a population of 14 million, and two-thirds of these are working in towns and cities, while most of the country's population is in the countryside.

 

It means access to good quality health care is often difficult if not impossible.

 

 

For many communities, it is not practical to expect sick and frail people to walk or cycle for hours to hospital.

 

So families depend on rural health centres, which have health workers but no qualified doctors.

 

The virtual doctors project means that these isolated health centres can be supported by doctors thousands of miles away.

 

 

Health workers and clinical officers on the ground use an app on a smartphone or tablet computer to take notes on a patient's symptoms and photographs.

 

This information is sent to a volunteer doctor in the UK who helps with a diagnosis and recommends treatment.  Cases are directed towards doctors with a relevant specialism, whether it is skin diseases or HIV and Aids-related problems.

 

The doctor in the UK will have a list of the drugs and equipment kept in the health centre in Zambia and can suggest treatment or further tests based on what is practical and available.

 

Virtual Doctors is now supporting 19 rural health centres, which typically deal with problems such as malaria, tuberculosis, HIV/Aids and pregnancy-related conditions.

 

 

 

 

 


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nrip's curator insight, July 7, 5:39 PM

The concept of a virtual doctor is not new, but it is one which will never get old.

 

At Plus91 we have been involved with multiple projects and pilots where simple tablet and smartphone based solutions are used by on-ground trained and sometimes untrained staff and advice, opinions, second opinions and in some cases virtual consultations are provided by remotely situated doctors and clinical staff. With time, the solutions eventually become more technologically advanced as the on ground staff get comfortable with such distributed protocols and the use of technology. This is an exciting solution as it helps provide much needed healthcare in small areas without qualified doctors. Who is to say this is not hi-tech ..for the millions who benefit from this, this is cutting edge.

 

Virtual doctor based solutions eventually evolve into distributed EMRs and local health centers become more involved.The Medixcel platform has a remote consultation as well as multi opinion module which was built out of this need and it has grown to be a platform of choice in many parts of Africa for being hi-tech yet simple. 

 

 

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How the desire for masculinity might drive some disadvantaged young men to substance abuse

How the desire for masculinity might drive some disadvantaged young men to substance abuse | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it
Awareness of social factors, such as society's perpetuation of masculinity, are critical to understanding the interconnections between trauma, disadvantage and substance abuse in young men.

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A Digital Health Advisor: The Next Logical Step in Healthcare Tech

A Digital Health Advisor: The Next Logical Step in Healthcare Tech | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it
A Digital Health Advisor: The Next Logical Step in Healthcare Technology

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New survey shows how patients use social media to gain better understanding of health condition

New survey shows how patients use social media to gain better understanding of health condition | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

A new survey from Health Union of more than 2,200 people with chronic health conditions and their caregivers illustrates how patients use online health information to better understand their health condition, learn about symptoms and treatment, and share experiences with other patients living with the same health condition. The findings are summarized in a recently published white paper, entitled "Social Media for Health: What Patients Really Want."

Condition-specific websites are the leading health resources for these patients online, with 70% of survey respondents using them and 29% rating them as their most valuable resource for health-related information. These numbers expound on the findings of the 2013 Pew Research Center survey on the social life of health information, which found that 73% of U.S. adults with at least one chronic condition have sought health information online.

While condition-specific websites are the most popular online resource, Facebook is the most frequently used social media resource for consuming and sharing health information. Twenty-six percent of respondents use it once or more daily for health, and more than half at least monthly. To maximize medical information access, Health Union has a Facebook page for each of its condition-specific online communities. This complementary presence allows community members to maximize engagement. For example, Health Union's Migraine.comhas a weekly Facebook reach of about 500,000.

 

People with chronic-conditions use online platforms to share and get support from others like themselves. As noted in the survey findings:

In the previous six months, 49% of individuals have posted or shared a personal story or content online and 48% have shared a health-related post, photo or video that was not their own... The desire to explain their condition drives most of those who posted or shared content online, along with managing or coping with the symptoms. This mirrors the behaviors observed on Health Union platforms, like MultipleSclerosis.net, RheumatoidArthritis.net andMigraine.com, where content that promotes understanding and support for these conditions receive the highest levels of engagement in social media.

In addition to getting support and information, survey respondents report using social media platforms to inform their discussions with healthcare providers (HCP). A staggering 97% use the information gathered online when visiting their HCP, with 73% citing it as having at least some impact on their health-related decisions.

"We are excited to see that patients are turning to online resources throughout their healthcare journey. People with chronic health conditions prefer online community resources, like the platforms provided by Health Union. These data confirm the value patients find by accessing online communities," said Tim Armand, president and co-founder of Health Union.


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Should Doctors Be More Careful with Social Media?

Should Doctors Be More Careful with Social Media? | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

The Internet provides an invaluable tool for medical professionals to both develop clinical skills, and obtain information. 1 In addition, according to a study put forward by Google, approximately 86% of patients utilize the Internet for educational purposes. 

 

The introduction of social media (SM) interfaces (e.g. Facebook, MySpace, Twitter etc.) has radically altered interaction both within direct social circles, and the wider community. The speed and distance messages can reach is unprecedented, all with the archiving ability provided by Internet sites.  With over 900 million individuals regularly using Facebook few are immune to the reach of SM. However, such interaction comes at a risk for a profession whose central tenants are based on trust and confidentiality.


One only has to look at examples such as Matthew Strausburg to realized the dangers of this situation.5 Interactions on SM websites are often thought of as private; however, this is far from the truth. Conversations can easily be seen by those not intended. This is combined with a disinhibition effect that comes from a feeling of anonymity and invisibility provided by the Internet.

 Given recent media outrage regarding posts by doctors in which ‘black humour’ and derogatory slang were used to refer to patients and other professionals,  it has been argued by some that the Internet in general, and SM in particular, should not be considered as the private sphere many believe it to be. 


An often cited concern with doctors’ use of SM is a resulting blur in the boundaries that constitute the physician-patient relationship. 10 Patients are an inherently vulnerable and dependant group and respect must be given to this situation. It is clearly ethically inexcusable to violate this relationship for personal gain over the well-being of the patient; either in the real, or virtual worlds. However, at what point does interaction between a patient and doctor become ethically unacceptable over SM? Is ‘friending’ on Facebook a step too far? It has certainly been argued as such by other authors. 


The dangers of SM interactions are likely to be disproportionately experienced by those in the lower ranks of the medical hierarchy. They have the least experience of the doctor-patient interaction and yet make up the major demographic on SM websites. Over 60% of medical schools have reported students having posted unprofessional content online; 7% of schools have dismissed a student for such offenses.11 This situation has led to feelings of personal risk from medical students when engaging with SM websites. 


SM provides an excellent mechanism for marketing to a targeted group of consumers. The recent sale of Facebook on the New York Stock Exchange indicates that this potential has been recognized by many.  In the USA, where marketing of private medical providers is commonplace, SM platforms are well utilised in some specialties.  In particular plastic surgery has been shown to have a high use of both Facebook and Twitter when marketing. 16 However, use of such techniques is not without risk, Wong et al. have highlighted the need for ethical overview of such practices.


The wealth of information now contained about individuals online provides a potentially lucrative source for employers. Directors for surgical resident programs in the USA were recently poled regarding the use of SM in assessing candidates suitability for obtaining positions.  Of 227 respondents, 83.7% believed that the information portrayed on SM sites accurately reflected the individual as a physician, with 62.9% believing that it would be fair and reasonable to assess a candidate using their SM profiles.  This position has been supported in other professions such as pharmacists. 


The role of SM in medicine is not without benefits. It provides new scope for targeting public health messages at a demographic often under-penetrated by current policies. 19 It also provides an opportunity for interacting with peers and colleagues in a way not previously possible, and may potentially form a natural extension of tele-medicine. 20 In addition, a compelling ethical argument has been put forward against the move to control doctors’ SM interactions. 21 First, it limits free speech in a way that would be, and in reality should be, unacceptable to the general public. Secondly, it detracts from doctors’ ability to informally raise concerns regarding aspects of the work environment with which they are discontented.


Professional bodies should not infringe upon the civil liberties of those they help to govern. However, advice, support, and education should be provided to the profession as a whole. Both the American Medical Association in the USA, and the General Medical Council in the UK have started to issue some guidance.  However, this is far from clear and definitive.

 

 

The world of social media is now a ubiquitous aspect of modern life. As such, it needs to be treated with more consideration by all concerned so that an equipoise is developed between maintaining a professional appearance on the one hand, while also allowing doctors an aspect of their private lives on the other.

 

References
1. 1. Cook D.A., Levinson A.J., Garside S., Dupras D.M., Erwin P.J., and Montori V.M.: Internet-based learning in the health professions: a meta-analysis. JAMA: the journal of the American Medical Association 2008; 300: pp. 1181-1196

2. 2. Derse A Social media consults may harbor dangers. [Internet]. American Medical News. 2010 [cited 2012 Jul 6];

3. 3. Hyman J.L., Luks H.J., and Sechrest R.: Online professional networks for physicians: risk management. Clinical orthopaedics and related research 2012; 470: pp. 1386-1392

 

4. 4. Key Facts [Internet]. Facebook. 2012 [cited 2012 Jul 7];


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9 Ways Digital Marketing Affects the Outcome of Healthcare Campaigns

9 Ways Digital Marketing Affects the Outcome of Healthcare Campaigns | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

While digital marketing has become a mainstay in many different industries, healthcare has been hesitant to adopt digital strategies. But now that more and more medical professionals are seeing the advantages of digital healthcare marketing, many see that it’s high time to embrace a more digital direction. To show healthcare marketers the value of diving into digital marketing,HealthworksCollective.com treated them to these nine key reasons.

1. Reduces Cost per Patient Acquisition (CPA)
Did you know that digital outreach can slash overall costs by as much as 50%, down to $149 per patient? Compare this to the cost of TV media, which averages $348 per patient. In addition, digital marketing consistently reduces total marketing spend and increases ROI in practically every industry.

 

2. Targets Patients with Certain Conditions
Digital marketing lets physicians target patients in a variety of ways, including by their condition, gender, age, and zip code. And BIA Kelsey research shows that 97% of consumers use the Internet for local shopping. By optimizing search terms in real time, physicians can yield better results and ROI.

3. It’s Modern Medicine
According to McKinsey research, 75% of people want to use digital healthcare services. With patients spending more time online and using mobile resources on a daily basis, digital is the modern way for physicians to practice medicine.

4. Brings Better Decisions with Better Data
While traditional marketing methods tend to be hard to track, digital strategies are rather easy to monitor and measure, thanks to a wealth of data-driven technologies. This data allows physicians to make more effective and efficient marketing decisions.

5. Helps Brands Stand Out in Search Engines
Marketing Land reports that around 20% of Google searches are health related and more than 70% of these searches result in a first-page click. But ensuring that your brand appears on the first page demands savvy SEO strategies and well-placed paid advertising campaigns targeted to your audience.

 
 

6. Allows for Personalized Marketing Messages
Digital marketing allows for personally targeting people, rather than sending a general message to the mass media audience. This lets physicians target prospective patients with just the right message, in the right context, at the right time.

7. Improves Patient Retention
Having a digital presence makes it faster and easier for patients to locate and reach a physician’s website, digital patient portals, and important information. Patients appreciate this convenience when taking control of their healthcare. In addition, patients also value a physician’s social media presence. In fact, PwC research showed that 41% of patients said that social media engagement will determine their choice of physician and medical treatment facility.

8. Increases Patient Referrals
More and more physicians are finding that digital marketing strategies help increase their number of prospective patients, as well as lower the cost of connecting and engaging with them. Plus, digital options make it easy for patients to access and engage physicians, which increases their satisfaction and frequency of referral.

9. Enhances the Patient Experience
Along with easing and expediting patient access, digital marketing improves the patient experience at every step and stage of their journey. Digital tracking systems make it simple to send regular appointment reminders, as well as respond to patient needs with relevant blog articles, and enhance their overall experience with patient satisfaction surveys.

By using digital healthcare marketing strategies, physicians can treat both their patients and their practice to a superior level of care.


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McKinsey & Google: Pharma needs to seize social media opportunity

McKinsey & Google: Pharma needs to seize social media opportunity | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

Pharmaceutical companies are missing out a major opportunity to grow their brands: social media. That’s according to a newly published e-book from McKinsey & Co., Google and The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.

“Historic mixes of advertising in traditional media combined with heavy salesforce coverage and ‘push’ messaging are insufficient,” the publication said. “While each of those tactics remains relevant, today’s commercial mix should reflect the fact that people are now viewing digital channels close to 50 percent of the time, and, even more importantly, that those people seek real engagement in regards to their care.”

From the e-book:

The most innovative marketers today are finding ways to solve a problem, delight, inspire, or empathize with patients right in the flow of what they are doing (instead of interrupting to push a message to them). Similarly, more and more HCPs use digital tools and media to confirm facts and as a way to connect with others for clinical advice as well as emotional support.

Indeed, according to the report, one of every 20 Google searches today is for health information, the book said. That’s grown 15 percent a year since 2011.

“As a result, pharma companies need to make a mindset shift from ‘telling’ to ‘listening’ and then (eventually) ‘engaging’ because patients are no longer passive recipients of care. Rather, they are active shapers of their care,” the McKinsey-Google-Wharton team wrote in the e-book, entitled, “Pharma 3D: Rewriting the script for marketing in the digital age.”

“Pharma 3D” stands for discover, design and deliver. “The 3D approach has helped scores of organizations across industries innovate their approaches to digital engagement,” said the lengthy document, which includes numerous case studies. (The authors promised to update the e-book with additional case studies in the future.)

They said that companies with a high “digital quotient” experience twice the rate of revenue growth as those that do not. “The investment in this considerable change is worth it,” the book said.


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