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Nearly 60 percent of US smartphone owners use phones to manage health

Nearly 60 percent of US smartphone owners use phones to manage health | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it
US consumers are getting more comfortable using mobile devices to manage their health, a new study finds. Even in the face of privacy concerns, Americans are increasingly sharing medical information, sending photos to their doctors, using fitness or activity trackers, and using AI to become active players in their healthcare.

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Younger Skin Through Exercise

Younger Skin Through Exercise | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it
Exercise appears to slow and even reverse the effects of aging on the skin.

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Wearables market up 26 percent since last year, with Fitbit, Xiaomi and Apple leading the pack

Wearables market up 26 percent since last year, with Fitbit, Xiaomi and Apple leading the pack | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it
The global wearables market is continuing to grow, with 22.5 million devices shipped in the second quarter of 2016 alone, according to a new tracking report by the International Data Corporation (IDC). Top companies in the sector are Fitbit, Garmin, Apple and the Chinese company Xiaomi.

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Talkdata2me's curator insight, September 7, 9:21 PM

I am an Apple person all the way, and I own a Microsoft Band! Some days I cannot live without it.

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Exercise Boosts Brain Health, but Is There a Downside?

Exercise Boosts Brain Health, but Is There a Downside? | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it
Some research suggests that exercise could impair long-term memory, but a new study allays many of those concerns.

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Digital marketing is becoming the new wave of healthcare marketing

A look back at the history of healthcare marketing, the present and the future. Healthcare marketing has evolved to both online and offline media. Read more: h…

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Supervising healthcare services with social media

Supervising healthcare services with social media | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

ocial media has become mainstream and a growing number of people use it to share health care-related experiences, for example on health care rating sites. These users’ experiences and ratings on social media seem to be associated with quality of care. Therefore, information shared by citizens on social media could be of additional value for supervising the quality and safety of health care services by regulatory bodies, thereby stimulating participation by consumers.

 
 
OBJECTIVE

In this study, we focused on the added value of social media for two types of supervision by the Dutch Healthcare Inspectorate (DHI), which is the regulatory body charged with supervising the quality and safety of health care services in the Netherlands. These were (1) supervision in response to incidents reported by individuals, and (2) risk-based supervision.

 
 
METHODS

We performed an exploratory study in cooperation with the DHI and searched different social media sources such as Twitter, Facebook, and healthcare rating sites to find additional information for these incidents and topics, from five different sectors. Supervision experts determined the added value for each individual result found, making use of pre-developed scales. Our searches resulted in relevant information for six of 40 incidents studied and provided relevant additional information in 72 of 116 cases in risk-based supervision of long-term elderly care.

 
 
RESULTS

The results showed that social media could be used to include the patient’s perspective in supervision. However, it appeared that the rating site ZorgkaartNederland was the only source that provided information that was of additional value for the DHI. while other sources such as forums and social networks like Twitter and Facebook did not result in additional information. This information could be of importance for health care inspectorates, particularly for its enforcement by risk-based supervision in care of the elderly. Further research is needed to determine the added value for other health care sectors.

 
 
CONCLUSIONS

This study shows that social media could be used to supervise healthcare services and better include the patient’s perspective in supervision. Interestingly, the Dutch rating site ZorgkaartNederland was the only source that provided relevant information.


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Extreme heat isn’t necessary for heatstroke, as this athlete’s harrowing story shows

Extreme heat isn’t necessary for heatstroke, as this athlete’s harrowing story shows | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it
Know the warning signs, and learn how to help someone in trouble.

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Why Snapchat Can And Should Be The Next Big Movement In Healthcare Marketing Features Medical Professionals

Why Snapchat Can And Should Be The Next Big Movement In Healthcare Marketing Features Medical Professionals | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

Social media is both a blessing and a curse for people around the world. With the majority of people posting pictures of their food, workouts, and statuses about their day, it seems like hardly anything is left to the imagination. Even if your profile is set to “private”, there are numerous ways for employers, exes, and random strangers to gain access to your content.

In the marketing world, however, social media represents an entirely new way to reach potential customers.

With the ability to reach billions of followers around the world each day, businesses are using social media to promote specials, attract followers, and expand the reach of their product. Right now, the up and coming new social media platform is Snapchat.

Created in 2011, Snapchat is a mobile messaging app where users send photos and videos to each other that self-destruct after a few seconds. Within the last year, Snapchat’s daily video views grew from 2 billion to 10 billion, according to Bloomberg Technology News. 

Businesses around the world are jumping on Snapchat’s new found popularity. Last December, the NFL became Snapchat’s first sports partner. Even The White House has a Snapchat account. Other statistics about this burgeoning company can be viewed in this article. 

Despite the growing popularity of this social media platform, it seems the healthcare industry is slow to utilize Snapchat as a marketing strategy. Of course HIPAA laws must be taken into consideration when using social media in regards to healthcare, but there are multiple, creative ways for the healthcare industry to use Snapchat.  

For instance, healthcare professionals can create Snapchat stories, a feature which allows the user to string together multiple snaps and create a video narrative that is available for users to view for 24 hours. This feature could be used to highlight a “Day in the Life of [insert medical professional here].”

Additionally, incorporating overlays, graphics or text that can be added on top of a photo, creates snaps which promote awareness for a certain disease or illness. For example, pink text overlay could be used during Breast Cancer Awareness Month. 

The reason Snapchat works so well in marketing is its simplicity and ability to create a sense of intimacy in a short amount of time. In a world where understanding healthcare is becoming more complicated and the digital world is making us feel more connected yet disconnected at the same time, Snapchat offers the ability to send quick, simple messages that still feel heartfelt.

Given that healthcare is now looked at by the general population as a consumer market, Snapchat may be underestimated as one of the best tools available for healthcare providers to create trust and comfort in patients and convey health information to the public.

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France's National Health Agency Calls for Reducing Children's Wireless Exposures

France's National Health Agency Calls for Reducing Children's Wireless Exposures | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

On July 8, the French National Agency of Health Security of Food, Environment and Labour (ANSES) published a new scientific report "Radiofrequency Exposure and the Health of Children".

Concluding that children are more vulnerable to radio frequency (RF) wireless exposures, the French report recommends immediately reducing exposures to wireless radiation from all wireless devices for young children.

 

Acknowledging the inadequacies of current outdated RF regulations, ANSES recommends strengthening RF exposure limits with child protective safety margins and developing more sophisticated premarket test methods to fully assess human exposures to RF radiation from wireless devices.

 

The new report has made headlines across the country.


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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, August 13, 1:52 PM

Time to cut down on exposure to wireless and mobile phone radiation? I don't mean only children but us as well!

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Why Hospitals Need to Embrace Digital and Social to Enhance Patient Engagement

Why Hospitals Need to Embrace Digital and Social to Enhance Patient Engagement | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

Recently, I injured my arm during a soccer match and had to have surgery. My experience with the hospital was mixed. Is it just me or do you too feel that patient engagement could still be a higher priority on many healthcare providers’ agenda?

While it was nice to only fill out my personal information once in the digital healthcare passport used by the surgery center, I was surprised to find that I was unable to schedule any appointments online — I had to call in — and my MRI was put onto a DVD that I was asked to keep track of instead of being stored in the cloud, which would have made it more accessible for me, my insurance company, my hospital and physician. I was also disappointed that the clinic didn't follow up with me post-surgery as expected, and didn’t email information about post-op steps. I don’t know about all of you, but generally after the fog of the anesthesia and pain wears off, I have a tough time recalling specific directions and advice.

I also found places where my paperwork and post-op directions didn’t match, as my follow up appointment turned out to be on a different day and time than the paperwork stated. I would have been happy to say some really positive things about the staff and care provided immediately before and after the surgery, should they have provided a link to share my experience with people having gone through a similar procedure. Instead, it’s mainly my family and friends on Facebook who know about my surgery and that I am now unable to do anything without my wife’s help.

Just a few years ago, I wouldn't have expected anything. But the convenience I now experience by booking travel via mobile, making my banking transactions from my laptop or reading restaurant reviews before planning a night out has raised my expectations from all service providers, including my insurer, car mechanic and doctor.

Blame it on digital and the digital disruptors using innovative techniques to deliver new levels of customer delight.

Retail, travel, hospitality, manufacturing and financial services are successfully using the powerful potential of digital and are using social media to effectively communicate with consumers, build brand awareness and engage with employees and partners. 74 percent of consumers now rely on social media to inform purchasing decisions, 51 percent of mobile phone owners in the U.S. will access banking services on their mobile phones in 2016 and 41 percent of consumers say social media affects their choice of a specific doctor, hospital or medical facility.

Despite these compelling statistics, a lot of untapped potential remains in the healthcare market. A Dell Services and UBM Tech study cites 53 percent of healthcare providers as having some presence in social media, but these same providers admit that they’re not particularly active in engaging with their target audience. Only 17 percent of those surveyed felt their organization’s efforts were very effective, and 67 percent said they had room for improvement or were not doing a good job in this space.

Healthcare providers can no longer afford to delegate social or digital initiatives as a nice-to-have program in their marketing campaigns, but instead need to take action to integrate it in their patient engagement strategy and adopt customer engagement practices from other industries.

There are many opportunities where healthcare providers can use social media listening and insights services to create value. Today, social media command centers help the American Red Cross identify critical needs in disaster-affected areas, which in turn increases the organization’s ability to quickly connect people with the resources they need during a disaster — such as food, water, shelter or even emotional support. Other opportunities to create value include:

Patient communication: providers can send alerts and reminders to patients via social channels and communicate personalized advice to improve quality of careCondition communities: caregivers and patients with similar conditions can connect via private and/or sponsored online social communitiesOperational insights: providers can listen for trends in patient comments to address the most significant problems before they escalatePatient sentiment: organizations can gather feedback via social channels on providers within a network and respond to influence patient sentiment and address systemic issuesHealth trends: providers can listen in on social channels to identify emerging seasonal health issues and respond to patient needs

There are some healthcare providers who have begun to cast their nets into the larger digital spectrum and explore the potential of analytics, customer relationship management (CRM), mobile and other channels to increase patient understanding and engagement. An example of this is our Patient360 solution that brings together social, mobile and analytics to provide a 360 degree view of the patient to generate meaningful insights. With the help of Single Score, a component of Patient360, we helped a healthcare provider build more effective marketing initiatives that indicate the likelihood of patients to respond to certain marketing campaigns and join particular patient affinity groups, thus helping them provide a better and more enriched experience.

I will be discussing some of the success factors and challenges to enabling patient engagement in the digital age in an upcoming webinar, Patient Engagement: Strategies for Improving Outcomes and Experience While Lowering Costs, along with a senior analyst from the Everest Group and Stephanie Bartels, Patient Engagement Solutions Leader for Dell Services. I hope you can join us and hope my own provider will be listening in too!


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'Virtual doctors' helping patients in Zambia 

'Virtual doctors' helping patients in Zambia  | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

The idea of a "virtual doctor" project might sound rather futuristic.

 

Zambia has about 1,600 doctors for a population of 14 million, and two-thirds of these are working in towns and cities, while most of the country's population is in the countryside.

 

It means access to good quality health care is often difficult if not impossible.

 

 

For many communities, it is not practical to expect sick and frail people to walk or cycle for hours to hospital.

 

So families depend on rural health centres, which have health workers but no qualified doctors.

 

The virtual doctors project means that these isolated health centres can be supported by doctors thousands of miles away.

 

 

Health workers and clinical officers on the ground use an app on a smartphone or tablet computer to take notes on a patient's symptoms and photographs.

 

This information is sent to a volunteer doctor in the UK who helps with a diagnosis and recommends treatment.  Cases are directed towards doctors with a relevant specialism, whether it is skin diseases or HIV and Aids-related problems.

 

The doctor in the UK will have a list of the drugs and equipment kept in the health centre in Zambia and can suggest treatment or further tests based on what is practical and available.

 

Virtual Doctors is now supporting 19 rural health centres, which typically deal with problems such as malaria, tuberculosis, HIV/Aids and pregnancy-related conditions.

 

 

 

 

 


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nrip's curator insight, July 7, 5:39 PM

The concept of a virtual doctor is not new, but it is one which will never get old.

 

At Plus91 we have been involved with multiple projects and pilots where simple tablet and smartphone based solutions are used by on-ground trained and sometimes untrained staff and advice, opinions, second opinions and in some cases virtual consultations are provided by remotely situated doctors and clinical staff. With time, the solutions eventually become more technologically advanced as the on ground staff get comfortable with such distributed protocols and the use of technology. This is an exciting solution as it helps provide much needed healthcare in small areas without qualified doctors. Who is to say this is not hi-tech ..for the millions who benefit from this, this is cutting edge.

 

Virtual doctor based solutions eventually evolve into distributed EMRs and local health centers become more involved.The Medixcel platform has a remote consultation as well as multi opinion module which was built out of this need and it has grown to be a platform of choice in many parts of Africa for being hi-tech yet simple. 

 

 

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How the desire for masculinity might drive some disadvantaged young men to substance abuse

How the desire for masculinity might drive some disadvantaged young men to substance abuse | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it
Awareness of social factors, such as society's perpetuation of masculinity, are critical to understanding the interconnections between trauma, disadvantage and substance abuse in young men.

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A Digital Health Advisor: The Next Logical Step in Healthcare Tech

A Digital Health Advisor: The Next Logical Step in Healthcare Tech | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it
A Digital Health Advisor: The Next Logical Step in Healthcare Technology

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Cancer Risk Goes Up the More Years You're Overweight

Cancer Risk Goes Up the More Years You're Overweight | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it
According to recent research, the longer a woman is overweight, the higher her risk of developing breast, endometrial, colon or kidney cancer becomes.

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Life after Fitbit: do trackers really make a difference?

Life after Fitbit: do trackers really make a difference? | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it
When Laura Hart first discovered Fitbit she was convinced the device would be life changing. She diligently tracked her steps and started paying close attentio

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Exercise May Lessen Some of the Bad Effects of Alcohol

Exercise May Lessen Some of the Bad Effects of Alcohol | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it
Good news for moderate drinkers of wine, beer, whiskey and vodka: exercise may offset some of the negative health effects of alcohol

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Here's How Healthcare Can Use Social Media To Create Trust

Here's How Healthcare Can Use Social Media To Create Trust | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

Last year, I had a terrible toothache. However, due to many cavity fillings and braces in my childhood, my relationship with dentists wasn’t the best. Unfortunately, after trying many home remedies that proved to be just temporary fixes, I realized that a trip to the dentist was necessary.

For two days, with the help of Google and social networks, I researched all the dental clinics around town in relation to tooth extraction. I found a clinic (and a dentist) that I thought I could possibly take a liking to. I took the risk and now I can proudly say that my relationship with dentists has definitely changed for the better.

The point of this story though wasn’t to talk about a personal experience. Rather it’s to discuss how the dental clinic used their online presence to convince potential customers to visit.  

Finding them online

You can have a well-designed website, regular social media and great online reviews but none of that will matter if your (potential) customer base doesn’t get to see them. Make sure you’re visible in Google search for the keywords that you want to target. Tip: check which keywords your competitors are using and which relevant keywords are being searched for most. Those are probably your best bet!

Reviews

It’s pretty simple – people trust people. Now that users are on your website and social media pages, they want to know what your existing customers think about you and your services. Make sure to highlight these reviews. Also, rather than showcasing all the reviews that say “I loved their service”emphasize on those reviews that are recent and are insightful as to what made YOU stand out for your customers.

Visual content

Lastly, as a potential customer, I want to know whether I can trust you. Use your social media pages to showcase your relationship with your customers. The dental clinic I ended up going to has a relaxed and fun-filled look with a jukebox in the waiting area. It’s social media pages were filled with pictures of their staff and patients having fun before and after procedures. And that—the personal side of the business—is what finally clinched the deal for me!


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Social Networking and Twitter in Medical Education

Discuss, Develop and Demonstrate strategies for leveraging social media networking sites (twitter) for dissemination of scholarly work and medical education …

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The Potentially Dangerous Intersection of Healthcare and Social Media

The Potentially Dangerous Intersection of Healthcare and Social Media | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

Lately, there have been numerous reports in the media raising patient privacy concerns due to healthcare providers’ use of social media in the workplace.  A few examples include:

An ER nurse posting to Instagram a photo of a bloodied trauma room taken just after treating a patient who had been hit by a subway train – causing the hospital to take action against the nurse and terminate her employment;A young St. Louis obstetrician who took to Facebook to air complaints about a chronically tardy patient, who had suffered a stillbirth – which was reposted and drew hundreds of angry comments and led to a reprimand of the physician by the hospital where she worked;A Northwestern University physician posting photos of a student admitted to a Chicago hospital for extreme intoxication – leading to a $1 million lawsuit for invasion of privacy and infliction of emotional distress;A Chicago ER nurse sharing information on Twitter about a gunshot patient, including insulting tweets and a photo of the bloodied trauma room where the medical staff tried to save him – leading to a lawsuit against the nurse and the hospital for negligence and emotional distress seeking more than $100,000;Reports of abuse of elderly residents of nursing homes and senior care facilities in California, Colorado and Iowa, including the posting of nude and other humiliating photos to Facebook, Instagram and Shapchat – leading to termination, license suspension, and even criminal prosecution.

Screenshot of a bloody trauma room posted to social media
via NY Med

These and other examples demonstrate that patients, employers, regulators and even law makers and law enforcement are taking very seriously these new types of privacy concerns spawned by emerging and evolving social media platforms, and they are becoming more aggressive in pursing such cases.  Some employers and industry groups are undertaking efforts to revamp internal policies and procedures and training methods to address issues unique to the ever-changing landscape of social media technology.  There is no way to tell what the future might bring in terms of patient privacy issues and social media, but it seems likely that these challenges will continue to plague the healthcare industry.


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Digital Marketing in Healthcare Industry: A Complete Guide

Digital Marketing in Healthcare Industry: A Complete Guide | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

There has been a visible transformation in the healthcare industry that creates both opportunities and challenges for marketers. There are two variables which drive this transition. One is the rise of the digitally empowered healthcare consumer and the other is the shift from a fee for service payment to a healthcare delivery model on the basis of patient satisfaction, quality outcomes, and transparency.

It affects both the ‘who’ and ‘how’ of marketing strategies in the medical industry. Therefore, there has been a transformation in the role of physicians as decision-makers.

There are five key trends that should be considered by every healthcare marketer:

1. CONSUMERS ARE NOW AVID RESEARCHERS

Today, the consumers are no longer satisfied to blindly accept what a doctor tells them. They prefer doing homework before visiting a doctor. This means that the doctor n longer has the only say on medications, hospitals, treatment, and more. Healthcare is more like the collaboration between the doctors and consumers.

2. HEALTHCARE MARKETERS TO TARGET PAYERS AND CONSUMERS

For healthcare marketers, there are different audiences. This segment is the primary ‘who’ on the basis of the product or service being offered. Not so surprisingly, doctors are the primary marketing target. And why not? They still recommend, prescribe, advocate, and buy products and services. However, doctor decision-making is gradually shrinking as decision-making shifts to healthcare consumers and payers. Therefore, the emerging trend is that healthcare marketers need to increasingly target payers and consumers.

3. DIGITAL CHANNELS OVERSHADOWING TRADITIONAL MARKETING

While digital marketing is infusing in almost every sector, the healthcare industry is one of them. The last couple of years has seen a huge jump in the preference of digital marketing over traditional marketing in the healthcare. According to MM&M study, the greatest growth for the biotech, medical, diagnostics, and pharmaceutical device marketing budgets is taking place in digital sales material, mobile apps, and social media. Since consumer marketing tricks are shifting greatly to digital ads, social media, and mobile apps, therefore, the shift to digital channels in the healthcare industry is no wonder.

4. SOME INSIGHTS BY THINK WITH GOOGLE’S ‘THE DIGITAL JOURNEY TO WELLNESS: HOSPITAL SELECTION’Search engines are used by 77% of the patients before booking appointments.Search drives nearly 3 times as many visitors to hospital sites as compared to the number of visitors from other affiliate/referral sites.44% of patients schedule an appointment who research hospitals on a mobile device.The decision process is empowered by digital content.

Before booking an appointment –

77% of patients use search.26% used reviews generated by consumers.50% used health information sites.54% of the patients used health insurance company sites.83% used hospital sites.5. GROWTH RATE OF INDIAN HEALTHCARE INDUSTRY

As per the predictions of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu India, the Indian healthcare market which is currently worth of US $100 billion will grow at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 23% to hit US $280 billion by 2020. This is due to increase in adoption of digital techniques. Seeing these growth trends in India, Google Health card offers health services in India

Also, the Healthcare Information Technology (IT) market which is currently valued at US $1 billion will grow 1.5 times more by 2020.


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On a changing social media landscape for researchers

On a changing social media landscape for researchers | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

Many Stanford researchers are social media savvy. They tweet with ease about the latest happenings in their field, pen blog posts or carefully monitor their LinkedIn pages. Others — both here and elsewhere — lack the time, or the interest, to cultivate their social media skills.

But increasingly, scientists are benefiting from promoting their own research on social platforms, according to a recent article in Nature. The piece quotes Matt Shipman, a communications specialist at North Carolina State University:

Each researcher must make a personal choice about how much time to spend promoting their work on social media. But judicious use of self-promotion, says Shipman, leads to visibility, which in turn can lead to increased citations and attract talented graduate students and postdocs to the lab. Yet scientists cannot simply flit in and out of the social-media landscape and hope to make a significant impact, Shipman adds. ‘Like any other relationship, it takes time and effort to build and sustain an online network.’

The piece also delves into the workings of Kudos, a site created in 2014 — and free to researchers — that offers scientists a one-stop shop for social media, giving each paper an easy-to-read summary and providing analytic features. From the article:

“With so much more research being undertaken and published, the current system of dissemination can no longer guarantee that your work will find its audience,” says [co-founder Charlie Rapple]. Kudos, she says, aims “to make research more discoverable” and to “help researchers get more credit for what they do and achieve more with their work”.

Some of the services Kudos provides are available elsewhere, notes Greg Tananbaum, who owns the California-based ScholarNext consultancy and focuses on scholarly communication and academic technology issues. But integrating them into one site is unique, he says. In particular, Kudos makes it easier for mid-to-late-career academics, who often are wary of social media, to engage on those platforms and measure the impact of that activity. ‘Creating a mechanism that makes it easier to onboard them into that world, is novel,’ he says.

So, scientists, dive on in. My advice? Be shrewd, confident, clever and a bit humble.


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From plate to podium: what does it take to fuel Olympic athletes?

From plate to podium: what does it take to fuel Olympic athletes? | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it
We all know that competing at the Olympics is the end product of years of training, but how much fuel do elite athletes need?

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UYP Lifestyle's curator insight, September 3, 9:00 AM

A short look into the dietary requirements needed to be an Olympian.

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Why Your Healthcare Practice Needs a Mobile Site

Why Your Healthcare Practice Needs a Mobile Site | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

If you’ve been researching new trends to add to your healthcare marketing plan, you’ve probably noticed that one of the biggest trends for 2016 is creating a mobile site for your practice. Mobile sites are an essential healthcare marketing strategy for 2016 and beyond, and they should be an important part of any marketing plan. Here’s why:

More People Using Mobile Devices

Did you know that the total number of searches on mobile devices has increased 43% year after year? It’s a trend that’s not going away and is only going to increase. Creating an effective mobile site now will help you ensure that your marketing plans are aligned with current trends, so you can increase your practice’s profile. Not only that, but you also want to ensure that you’re meeting your audience’s wants and needs.

More Conversions

Four out of five consumers use their smartphones to shop. Having a mobile site is great, but if it’s not optimized for proper use, you could be missing out on potential new patients. Be sure to make it easy for your audience to make an appointment on your mobile site so you can harness those potential patients who are visiting your mobile site.

Reduce Bounce Rate

Having a site specifically designed for mobile users will also help reduce your bounce rate. Your regular website won’t load as well on a smartphone, so users are likely to leave if it takes too long to load or is unreadable. A specially designed mobile site that can load quickly will ensure that your audience stays with you long enough to become a potential patient.


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How exercise lowers cancer risk

How exercise lowers cancer risk | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it
For decades, health researchers across the world have known that athletes enjoy a significantly lower risk of cancer than the rest of us. - New Zealand Herald

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Mobile devices, social media may improve emergency heart, stroke care -

Mobile devices, social media may improve emergency heart, stroke care - | Healthcare updates | Scoop.it

Mobile devices, social media, visual media and crowdsourcing have potential to improve emergency care for cardiac arrest, heart attack and stroke, according to a new scientific statement.

The statement, published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, is based on studies that evaluated the effectiveness of digital strategies in emergency cardiac and stroke care.

“Digital platforms can support existing efforts to educate people about what to do in an emergency,” said Raina Merchant, M.D., M.S.H.P., co-author of the statement and director of the Social Media Lab at the Penn Medicine Center for Health Care Innovation in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

“Learning what to do — including how to perform CPR and recognizing the symptoms of stroke — is something many people can do that can save lives.”

Positive results of digital strategies include a Swedish study in which 62 percent of people alerted to use a mobile phone application within 500 meters of a cardiac arrest victim started CPR, while only 48 percent of bystanders without the app started CPR.

In a Japanese study, emergency department personnel who sent pictures of 12-lead ECGs via their smartphone instead of fax to interventional cardiologists shaved 1.5 minutes off the time clinicians needed to diagnose a patient.

Smartphone apps to view brain images for stroke and Face Time videoconferencing apps to assess stroke patients by a remote neurologist may also be feasible, the statement authors said. But more evidence of the effectiveness of using the tools is needed.

To date, no research has shown negative results of using digital tools for emergency cardiac or stroke care. But the authors said unintended consequences to patients due to inaccurate information provided via digital tools could lead to medical errors, higher costs and disclosing patients’ health information in violation of federal privacy law.

“As many of these interventions are new and emerging, it is an optimal time to conduct rigorous evaluations just as are done for traditional medical therapies and interventions,” Merchant said.


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