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The ways in which technology benefits healthcare
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4 keys to maintaining IT initiatives and a healthy hospital culture

4 keys to maintaining IT initiatives and a healthy hospital culture | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

It's no secret CIOs are busy as ever, dealing with everything from to ICD-10 to meaningful use to staff burnout and more. With the flood of new IT and the uncertain future of the industry, it's no wonder many are hesitant about what to do next.

 

We asked John Halamka, MD, CIO at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, about maintaining a healthy hospital culture in today's industry. Halamka looked back to a blog post of his, which describes the popular acronym "VUCA." Using that, he outlined four roadblocks to a healthy hospital culture – and offered ideas about how to overcome them.

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ONC pilot uses tablets for HIE meaningful consent

ONC pilot uses tablets for HIE meaningful consent | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) plans to launch a pilot in September to determine whether patients can “meaningfully consent” to their data being shared with other health care providers using an application on a tablet in the waiting room. The pilot will take place at a hospital and three clinics in western New York that are all a part of the HEALTHeLINK health information exchange. If the pilot works, HHS and ONC plan to make the patient consent education app open source so that other facilities can use it, too.

 

“By ‘meaningful consent’, they meant that individuals would really understand what they were consenting to and would be informed about how their information would be shared,” Joy Pritts, chief privacy officer at ONC said, according to a report over at Healthcare Info Security.

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Legal Frameworks for eHealth: Based on the Findings of the Second Global Survey on eHealth

Given that privacy of the doctor-patient relationship is at the heart of good health care, and that the electronic health record (EHR) is at the heart of good eHealth practice, the question arises: Is privacy legislation at the heart of the EHR? The second global survey on eHealth conducted by the Global Observatory for eHealth (GOe) set out to answer that question by investigating the extent to which the legal frameworks in the Member States of the World Health Organization (WHO) address the need to protect patient privacy in EHRs as health care systems move towards leveraging the power of EHRs to deliver safer, more efficient, and more accessible health care.


The survey began with a question on the existence of generic privacy legislation followed by questions to establish if specific rules had been adopted to address privacy in EHRs. A series of questions followed pertaining to the way in which privacy is addressed in transmittable EHRs and patients' rights to access, correct, and control the use of the EHR. The investigation ended by broaching the issue of privacy protection in secondary uses of data contained in EHRs, such as for international research purposes.

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What Mobile Devices Do Hospitals Support or Plan To Support in the Next 24 Months?

What Mobile Devices Do Hospitals Support or Plan To Support in the Next 24 Months? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Among more than 130 surveyed health IT professionals, 83.3% said their hospital supports clinicians' use of Apple iPads on their network or plans to support such use over the next 24 months, according to a survey by Aruba Networks, a provider of network access technology.


About 65.2% of survey respondents said their hospital supports or plans to support the use of Apple's iPhone or iPod Touch. About 52.3% said their hospital supports or plans to support the use of Blackberry devices and 51.5% said their hospital supports or plans to support the use of an Android-based smartphone.


In addition, 45.5% said their hospital supports or plans to support clinicians' use of Android-based tablet computers.


The report is based on an online survey conducted from December 2011 to January 2012 among more than 130 health IT professionals working at hospitals in North America and around the world.

 

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U.S. leads many nations in health IT

U.S. leads many nations in health IT | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

When it comes to health information technology adoption and use, the United States is among the worldwide leaders, according to research by Accenture.

 

About half of all specialists and primary care doctors are using the technology, the organization said.

 

The management and technology research and consulting group interviewed physicians and health IT leaders from eight countries, including the United States, to determine how mature use is among health care organizations in each nation.

"This research basically says that if you think about maturity as the intersection between adoption and exchange of information, the United States is actually pretty consistently more in the advanced group than has been previously recognized," said Kaveh Safavi, MD, managing director of Accenture's North American health practice.

 

Dr. Safavi said the United States' success has to do with a combination of top-down (government mandates, for example) and bottom-up (physician choice) approaches to health IT adoption. He said one thing that was made apparent in the research was that countries that approached health IT adoption either from an all top-down approach -- or all bottom-up approach -- were unsuccessful.

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Infographic:Social Media in Healthcare

Infographic:Social Media in Healthcare | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Social media is becoming increasingly more prevalent within the healthcare industry. With more hospitals and doctors joining social-media platforms on a consistent basis, it begs the question of “helpful or harmful”? One thing is certain: clear parameters must be established, so professional and personal lines don’t become blurred.

 

It’s vital to have a well-diversified and comprehensive social-media policy in place, outlining the dos and don’ts for everyone within your facility. Start reducing risk and liability associated with social media, stat—access renowned medical facilities’ social media policies for their guidelines on getting social.

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Mobile views healthcare as biggest opportunity

Mobile views healthcare as biggest opportunity | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

According to a recent Deloitte survey, 78 percent of senior mobile industry executives view healthcare as the most promising new growth channel for 4G services. Deloitte conducted about 250 interviews with senior executives from mobile network operators, mobile device manufacturers, software applications developers and infrastructure component manufacturers and finished analyzing the results last August. After healthcare and the life sciences, those interviewed picked the retail industry and the financial industry as the second and third most promising industry verticals for mobile growth potential.

 

Deloitte’s report, which is freely available here, includes a discussion of the trends driving mHealth as well as a summary of the barriers holding it back:

 

“Before the real breakthroughs occur on a scale required to address escalating healthcare costs, mHealth adoption needs to build momentum by overcoming some important hurdles. To begin with, more trials are required to broaden the disease and population samples and align them with FDA recommendations. To date, trials have been carried out on a selective basis but need to broaden to end the uncertainty about the true extent of health benefits to the patient, and the subsequent effect of reducing hospital readmissions and caregiver visits. This should also help broaden commitment from the healthcare industry’s insurance sector, which so far has been reluctant to provide coverage for patients using these technologies. In parallel, pricing on RPM devices needs to align with current consumer electronics price points to stimulate consumer demand and ensure widespread adoption,” Deloitte wrote in the report.

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BCPSQC Quality Forum 2012 | 6 Reasons a Doctor Should Consider Using Social Media

Here are Rich’s 6 Reasons a Doctor Should Consider Using Social Media, along with some examples that were shared in the camp’s workshops.

 

1) Communicate more effectively with the public and peers.
Social Media Camp’s Twitter 101 workshop featured HootSuite Educator Kemp Edmonds. He illustrated how many leading health organizations have taken to Twitter as a means of outreach. Edmonds cited Phillip Baumann’s 140 Health Care Uses for Twitter as a great place to start.

 

2) Stay current on leading issues in health care.
In the world of SM, news travels fast – like how #SocialMediaCamp quickly and easily trended in Canada the morning of the Camp! With the ability to share and repost health articles from medical journals worldwide, it’s never been easier to access the latest information.

 

3) Securely exchange information with peers.
Rich’s “Physician Champions” offer a great example of how doctors are able to share and facilitate ideas through their own online networks. For example check out Dr. Allan Brookstone and Dr. Mike Evans.

 

4) Conduct medical research.

Social media is a great way to engage the public and solicit feedback. Speakers Ian Roe and Mark Gilbert from the BC Centre for Disease Control demonstrated how Immunization BC and Smart Sex BC online campaigns were able to gather data and provide more accessible information to the public.

 

5) Monitor trending health topics.
Health care workers can now engage online and be part of the conversation to help provide information on hot topics or debunk media circulated myths. Many participants learned how to do this at Social Media Camp’s introductory workshops.

 

6) Communicate with and engage patients.
Pat said this is a great benefit to doctors using social media, but they should do so with caution and respect patient privacy. A great example of this, albeit not from the health care field, was given by Vancouver City Councilor Andrea Reimer, who delivered the event’s closing keynote.

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Tablet EHR: Physicians crave them, so what's the hold-up?

Tablet EHR: Physicians crave them, so what's the hold-up? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

With demand high for EHR on tablets and mobile devices, it's surprising how few software vendors have actually developed native iPad apps.

 

Physicians and nurses are unsatisfied with EHRs in general, he added, so this experience of trying to access them on an iPad using Citrix just exponentially increases the frustration.

 

Most physicians tend to love Apple products, he said. They want to access their information wherever they are. “Doctors have been looking for something like this with a clipboard-like apparatus, and the iPad meets most of their criteria,” Berdofe said. “The software vendors are definitely getting requests and pressure from users to create native iPad versions.”

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Online and Mobile: The Potential of Personalized Health Information

Online and Mobile: The Potential of Personalized Health Information | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

An average 24 year old will spend more time on Facebook than they will with their doctor in 20 years, according to Razorfish Health. Given this type of reality, how do you unlock the potential prowess of personalized health in online and mobile health strategies? That is the question.

 

Personalized Medicine vs. Personalized Health

We are in an age of personalized medicine. Personalized medicine refers to therapies that can be tailored to an individuals own genetics and physiology. Some relate this to genomics as a way to bridge the gap between the Human Genome Project to individualized healthcare. According to a report from the Kaufman Foundation, “personalized medicine” is a part of a broader field called personalized health.

 

Personalized health “includes predictive tests and technologies for individuals and for society, and science-based strategies to prevent or mitigate disease and poor health.” We don’t have to look too far to see personalized health at work, especially given the ongoing evolution in mobile technologies, digital strategies, online communities and health IT.

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HHS Revamps Its Open-Source Software for HIEs - Health Care IT - News & Reviews

HHS Revamps Its Open-Source Software for HIEs - Health Care IT - News & Reviews | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
The Department of Health and Human Services has unveiled Connect 3.3, its updated open-source software that allows health information exchanges to be interoperable.

 

The Federal Health Architecture in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has announced version 3.3 of Connect, the open-source gateway software that allows health care IT developers to create health information exchanges. Operating in the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT, within HHS, the FHA manages health IT among 20 federal agencies.

 

States are actively setting up HIEs to allow electronic health records (EHRs) to be interoperable.

 

Several government agencies built Connect to establish interoperability standards for the exchange of EHRs, including the Food and Drug Administration, NASA, the Department of Homeland Security and the National Institutes of Health.

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Social Media From a Pediatrician Point of View: Interview

Social Media From a Pediatrician Point of View: Interview | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

I use my blog as the main space and place to educate. I make videos that live there, as well as on YouTube on a weekly basis, and I author 2-3 posts a week. I also use twitter on a daily basis –I share and opine about recent studies, traction for new work in the media, parenting advice. BUT MORE, I listen. I use twitter to research how moms/dads online are responding to controversial parenting topics and new findings, but also how they share about their own lives. I listen and learn from my incredible community there: world health experts, pediatricians, activated patients, bloggers, etc. It’s a place for me to grow, network and share my thinking. I am also on LinkedIn but I primarily use it as an inbox and a way to connect and network. I also spend time (less and less now) on Google Plus, Quora, and Doximity (an online community for physicians).

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Your Healthcare and Social Media Presence: Reputation Management - Howard J. Luks

Your Healthcare and Social Media Presence: Reputation Management - Howard J. Luks | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The objectives of each healthcare professional who chooses to establish a presence in the healthcare social media space is going to vary.

 

As such we will have colleagues who are interested in “Inbound” marketing objectives, “Outbound” marketing objectives, personal learning, educational outreach, reputation management, or simply for advertising their services. In Part I of this series, we explored “Why you should seek to establish your digital media footprint”. Part II focused on the offline preparation necessary to prepare for a healthcare social media presence. Meredith Gould was kind enough to elaborate on the sociological perspective of your offline planning in Part IIb.

 

I recently surveyed 180 physicians and healthcare professionals and 25 wrote in that they were interested in reputation management. Many people are discussing their diseases and their physicians online … it behooves the practicing physician to actively monitor their presence online and manage their online reputation long before a brewing firestorm has the potential to effect the bottom line of their practice.

 

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Hospitals on Twitter: Current trends and proven strategies

Hospitals on Twitter: Current trends and proven strategies | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Today is the sixth anniversary of the first message sent on Twitter—but 100 billion tweets later, hospital executives still have questions about the service's value and role. Social media experts discuss key lessons and Twitter's potential ROI.

 

There's no doubt that Twitter has transformed online communication—even in health care, where providers are notoriously slow to embrace Web technologies.


But years after hospitals launched their first Twitter accounts, executives are still wrestling with fundamental questions that would be unacceptable for a traditional service line. How much of an impact does Twitter really offer? And are organizations seeing actual return on investment?


State of the health care Twitter-verse
Roughly 1,000 hospitals—about one-fifth of the nation's total—now have a presence on Twitter.
That's either a major achievement or an ongoing disappointment, depending on which social media expert you ask.

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3 ways physicians succeed with social media

While caveats apply, physicians are continuing to report success in using social media to connect with patients and promote their careers.

 

For example, the Surgical Weight Control Center of Las Vegas uses its Facebook page to keep patients motivated to stick with their diet and exercise plans, according to a recent article in the Las Vegas Review-Journal. By posting content, such as photos of patients who have completed marathons or the "50 Best Workout Songs of the Year," the practice provides current and potential patients with ongoing support and resources.

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Poor Physician-Patient Communication – Is “Lack of Time” Really the Problem?

Poor Physician-Patient Communication – Is “Lack of Time” Really the Problem? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

If the lack of time is the chief barrier to poor physician-patient communications, it logically follows that longer patient appointments are the solution. Ok…lets’ say that I could wave a magic wand and add 5 or even 10 more minutes to the average primary care office visit. Would more time really make a difference?


Probably not. A quick examination of just some of the key drivers of physician-patient communications reveals why:

 

More Time Will Not Change How Physicians View the Physician-Patient Relationship
A physician’s communication style is a “window” into how they view the physician-patient relationship, e.g., physician-centered versus patient-centered. One landmark study of physician communication styles found that almost two-thirds of physicians (IM and FP) in the study had a physician-centered view of how physicians and patients should relate to one-another.

 

 

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NIST Releases Technical Guidance for Evaluating Electronic Health Records

NIST Releases Technical Guidance for Evaluating Electronic Health Records | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

An important aspect of any product is how easily someone can use it for its intended purpose, also known as usability. Electronic health records (EHR) that are usable have the potential to improve patient care, which is why the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has outlined formal procedures for evaluating the usability of EHR systems.


The proposed usability protocol encourages a user-centered approach to the development of EHR systems. It provides methods to measure and address critical errors in user performance before those systems are deployed in a medical setting.

 

This guidance can be a useful tool for EHR developers to demonstrate that their systems don’t lead to use errors or user errors,” said NIST researcher Matt Quinn. “It will provide a way for developers and evaluators to objectively assess how easy their EHR systems are to learn and operate, while maximizing efficiency.”

 

The protocol is a three-step process consisting of an analysis of how the application functions, expert review, and validation testing of the user interface to make sure it works as intended.

 

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Challenges Faced by Diabetic Specialists in EHR Implementation

Challenges Faced by Diabetic Specialists in EHR Implementation | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Electronic Health Records (EHRs) and Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) have started to affect almost all the specialties and diabetes care is no exception. A study by The New England Journal of Medicine finds that EHRs can have a positive impact on the quality of the care that is provided to diabetes patients. The report titled Electronic Health Records and Quality of Diabetes Care clarifies that sites with EHRs have better quality of care compared to those with paper based records. Another survey by the U.S National Library of Medicine, National Institute of Health also presents the advantages of using EHRs for caring for diabetes patients in another case study.

 

There are approximately 24 million diabetes patients in the country and as the population ages, this number will grow. Moreover, since diabetes is a chronic condition that has no final cure, caring becomes a continuous process with numerous hurdles. These hurdles can be overcome by using EMRS and EHRs which are especially designed in order to periodically monitor the condition of the patient and provide better care due to this approach. The biggest challenge in diabetes is the monitoring and control of blood sugar on a daily basis which can be exhaustive for the patient to check and keep a detailed record of. This is where EMRs and EHRs can be of immense help. EHRs and EMRs can help in keeping a detailed record of blood sugar levels along with other factors such as Body Mass Index and numerous other features. Such reports can be sent to patients in the form of lab reports and assessed by the patient regularly to maintain better health.

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How to maintain physician professionalism in social media #hcsm

Art is not a mirror held up to reality but a hammer with which to shape it.

- Bertolt Brecht

 

In prior posts, I have discussed the issue of professionalism and social media. I have also taken issue with medical organizations’ extant social media guidelines. In some of these posts’ comments, it has been noted that there is no corresponding guideline or document that expressly discusses appropriate, positive use of social media in health care communications.

 

As a result, I am taking the liberty of making some suggestions as to what I think are important guiding principles for effective physician use of social media. This will include some cautions that I feel are especially useful, but I would also like to explain how and why I think physicians can use social media in positive and useful ways.

 

Part of this task includes defining physician professionalism. There are various definitions, but they share the common themes of respect for patients’ autonomy, individualism, and privacy; response to and concern for societal needs; embodiment of humanistic values of altruism, empathy, compassion, honesty, and integrity; focus on the scientific basis of medical knowledge; accountability to peers; and commitment to professional development and competence

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6 Ways to Promote Health Care Blogs

6 Ways to Promote Health Care Blogs | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Here are six strategies to effectively promote your health care blog to build readership and traffic:

 

1. Optimize for search. Search engine optimization techniques work for blogs too. Selecting relevant keywords and placing them thoughtfully in the titles and body of your blog text are important first steps in optimizing your blog content for search. And don’t forget to register your blog on Google, Bing and Technorati, a specialized search engine focused on blogs.

 

2. Syndicate to maximize exposure. Your original content can be published on your blog’s site as well as health care portals that aggregate content from multiple health care blogs. Each portal has specific directions on submitting posts for publication on their sites. Choose a portal whose target audience or theme most closely matches your blog. Some health portals to consider:

 

Disruptive Women in Health Care

HealthWorks Collective

KevinMD

MedCity News

Prepared Patient Forum

The Health Care Blog

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Why are Cloud Technologies Leaping to the Top?

Why are Cloud Technologies Leaping to the Top? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Providers are increasing their reliance on cloud technology to better address organizational hiccups and bottlenecks. Why? Because cloud technology allows resources to be accessed on demand, which results in a more effective and efficient work force, stronger operations and better customer care. It is a low-cost option that blows the competition out of the water.

 

Cloud-based EHRs:


With the meaningful use mandate and new legislation, many organizations are “improving” operations by implementing new EHR systems. These systems are costly but provide great value to organizations and patients. However, cloud- based EHRs are leaps and bounds above the traditional pre-packaged EHRs, because cloud-based EHRs aggregate the data from multiple, disparate, internal and external sources into a single record or view. This type of EHR is secure and accessible from anywhere, but more importantly – it puts the burden (and possibly liability) of security and maintenance on the vendor instead of the organization.

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5 Ways Hospitals Can Use Facebook Timeline Content Marketing

5 Ways Hospitals Can Use Facebook Timeline Content Marketing | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Many of you have had a chance to play around with Facebook Timeline on your personal profiles.
But by March 30th 2012, Facebook will roll out Timeline for business pages as well. Timeline will change the design and layout of business pages and make them look like personal profiles.

 

The new focus will be to make your content more compelling by using visual elements to tell your corporate story i.e. content marketing. Hospitals will have a great opportunity with Timeline to share some of their history, their current activities and perhaps even their vision with their fans by using photos, videos, apps and company milestones.
Essentially Timeline will give hospitals (and all brands for that matter) a blank template and a chance to share how their story has been built up over the years.


Here are 5 ways that hospitals can use Timeline for content marketing (i.e. to tell their corporate story)

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9 Facebook posts that can help hospitals connect with patients

9 Facebook posts that can help hospitals connect with patients | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

If you’re a hospital on Facebook, hopefully you’ve realized by now that the social networking site isn’t just a marketing tool.

 

A page that’s consistently updated with a fresh variety of content, photos and video can attract followers and become a way to not only bolster the hospital’s reputation but also to share interesting information and engage patients in meaningful conversation.

 

“By setting a standard of having good patient communication and engaging with patients, hospitals are in fact subtly marketing themselves as a cutting edge institution that offers these advantages,” said Nancy Finn, president of Communication Resources and author of E-Patients Live Longer.


But the point is not engagement for engagement’s sake. The real return for hospitals investing in social media is stronger loyalty among patients and new interest from potential patients, so be strategic about what you post and be sure to give users a call to action, added Betsy Weaver, the CEO of healthcare social media content provider Ubicare.

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Survey: Patient engagement important, but loosely defined

What exactly is patient engagement? According to the National eHealth Collaborative's 2012 stakeholder survey released last month, there is little agreement among health leaders. They currently use a variety of definitions that range from patients having access to educational materials to patients using their own electronic health record to transmit data to outside organizations.

 

Survey respondents may not define patient engagement the same way, but an overwhelming 95 percent said the issue is "very important" or "important" in transforming healthcare. Only 5 percent called it "somewhat important," while no respondents characterized it as "not important."

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Is mHealth just another gimmick?

Is mHealth just another gimmick? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The use of cell phones by community health workers and other medical practitioners in low-income countries has been promoted as a potential revolution for health systems development. This “mHealth” revolution has been seen as an opportunity to develop diagnostic, treatment and surveillance networks wirelessly, to build mobile apps allowing remote nurses and doctors to provide higher-quality care to rural patients even in places without a hospital or well-functioning health clinic. Several foundations are now offering grants to build and distribute phone applications that will offer everything from prescription drug advice to epidemic surveillance tools. But is mHealth really going to improve health outcomes? Or is it just another technological bomb thrown at poverty and poor infrastructure?

 

The theory

 

Globally, about 3.1 billion people used mobile phones in 2007; that’s nearly half the planet. The greatest growth during the last decade has occurred in Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. In many of these continents, mobile phone subscribers outnumber fixed-line telephone subscribers, particularly as countries leap-frog over the traditional development step of planting land-lines and rely instead on building wireless communication towers and Internet-based businesses.

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