healthcare technology
123.4K views | +1 today
Follow
healthcare technology
The ways in which technology benefits healthcare
Curated by nrip
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Everything in medicine is going mobile

Everything in medicine is going mobile | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Mobile technology has become such an important part of health information technology that HIMSS launched its mHIMSS initiative just a few months before the annual conference, held in late February in Las Vegas. The effort is intended to provide educational resources and guidance to health IT professionals trying to meet demands of physicians they support. Within three months, it had more than 3,600 members.

 

Cardiologist Eric J. Topol, MD, was on a cross-country flight when an attendant made an announcement asking if there was a doctor on board.

 

Dr. Topol, chief academic officer for Scripps Health, responded and was brought to a man who was in obvious trouble. Only a year or two ago, Dr. Topol would have had to make an educated guess and hope he could take care of the patient until the plane landed.

 

This time, though, he pulled out his iPhone, and with an app that produces an electrocardiogram, he determined that the patient was having a heart attack. The plane made an emergency landing while paramedics waited on the ground to take the patient directly to surgery to open the blocked arteries causing the attack.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Nurses create mobile apps using drag and drop interface

Nurses create mobile apps using drag and drop interface | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
The age of the non-technical app developer may be dawning, as more and more developers create actual mobile application development platforms for Android and iOS devices.

 

Recently, Northern Devon Healthcare Trust adopted a policy and a platform that allowed non-technical employees to design their own mobile apps. The software is from British software provider NDL. The company’s awiMX toolkit is designed to allow non-technical staff to create mobile applications using a drag-and-drop interface.

NHS did this in response to a request from the government, and instead of having to hire more people or force their current staff to do unnecessary work, they settled on the awiMX platform.

 

“From April this year, NHS trusts will be obliged to complete the Community Information Data Set (CIDS), which involves collecting 150 different data points on patients, including demographics, care records and referrals.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Who do Doctors trust in EHR Selection?

Anne Zieger has a really interesting post about Hospital Recommended EHR software over on Hospital EMR and EHR. In it she talks about how most doctors don’t take the hospital recommended EHR software. This will come as little surprise to doctors and likely to hospital systems as well. Doctors and hospitals have always had a mixed bag relationship. There’s this odd co-dependence that usually makes the relationship awkward.

 

 

When it comes to EHR adoption, physicians love the idea of getting IT and implementation support from the hospital. They also love the group buying power. Although, they also are concerned that they’ll just be a small fish in the big hospital waters and not get the support that they think they deserve (and maybe they do). Although, the most important reason doctors don’t want to get the hospital recommended EHR is they don’t want to create that “permanent” tie to the hospital. Of course, this is one major reason why hospitals want doctors to take their recommended EHR.

 

If we can say that doctors don’t trust hospitals recommended EHR software, then who do they trust?

 

That answer is easy: other doctors.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Cloud-based EHRs raise unique HIPAA challenges

Cloud-based EHRs raise unique HIPAA challenges | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Cloud-based electronic health record systems have become increasingly popular. But they raise security issues that providers need to address, according to attorney Howard Burde, speaking at the 20th National HIPAA Summit in Washington, D.C. this week.

 

"The healthcare information is stored, used, and analyzed remotely from the users, and accessed through the Internet," Burde said. "It's going somewhere you don't know."

 

Some security issues that are particularly acute in cloud computing, according to Burde, include:

 

Access to data, back-up plans, and business continuity in the event of a disaster

 

What security incident procedures are in place in the cloud

 

How physical access to the server in the cloud is limited

 

Burde recommended that providers need to conduct security management analysis of the cloud--which includes the ability to audit the cloud provider--to ask if its workforce is adequately trained in HIPAA, and a way to evaluate how the data is kept secure.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Health IT and doctors: A framework for successful partnerships

Health IT and doctors: A framework for successful partnerships | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

We are on the front lines of the healthcare revolution along side our patients and our colleagues in technology. We have firsthand experience of the shortcomings in the healthcare industry, and we know that it’s going to take a concerted effort to upend the system. Those of us who are able to adapt and apply new technology solutions to existing problems will undoubtedly make positive changes.

 

Barriers to entry into entrepreneurship are falling as tools for innovation are becoming ubiquitously accessible. The next phase in healthcare disruption is taking place as smart doctors with good insights and creative developers/designers/engineers get together to create well-rounded problem solving teams.

 

Like any battle for change, good communication between all parties makes for a higher chance of success. Good communication starts with an understanding of the languages spoken between industries and herein lies the reason for this article:

Doctors suck at explaining their health IT ideas to the people who can help make them a reality.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

The Cloud Will Cure Cancer

The Cloud Will Cure Cancer | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Much ink has been spilled on the huge leaps in communications, social networking, and commerce that have resulted from impressive gains in IT and processing power over the last 30 years. However, relatively little has been said about how computing power is about to impact our lives in the biggest way yet: Health. Two things are happening in parallel: technology to collect biological data is taking off and computing is becoming massively scalable. The combination of the two is about to revolutionize health care.

 

Understanding disease and how to treat it requires a deep knowledge of human biology and what goes wrong in diseased cells. Up until now this has meant that scientists do experiments, read papers, and go to seminars to get data to build models of both normal and diseased cell states. However, medical research is about to go through a tectonic shift made possible by new technological breakthroughs that have made data collection much more scalable. Large amounts of data combined with computers mean that researchers will have access to data beyond just what they can themselves collect or remember. A world with affordable massive data in the clinic and in the lab is on the horizon. This will mean exponentially faster medical progress.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Behind the Scenes of the World's First Live-Tweeted Open-Heart Surgery

Behind the Scenes of the World's First Live-Tweeted Open-Heart Surgery | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Doctors and digital pros from the hospital that pulled off the world's first live-tweeted open-heart surgery give their inside story.

 

Dr. Michael Macris performed a double-coronary artery bypass on a 57-year-old patient. Meanwhile, colleague Dr. Paresh Patel provided 140-character updates throughout the procedure, and answered questions submitted by followers of the hospital’s @houstonhospital Twitter account. Dr. Macris also wore a video camera attached to his head. Dr. Patel snapped additional photos, and posted some of the pictures and videos to Twitter. The procedure lasted two and a half hours, and the patient made it through fine.

 

More than anything, though, the feat is a powerful example of social media’s ability to connect people and shed light on even the most unexpected activities. Its success is a lesson in using creativity and digital innovation to educate mass audiences

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Elderly Patients Want Docs To Explain Technology

Elderly Patients Want Docs To Explain Technology | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Older patients asked to use mobile monitoring devices want clinicians to coach them, according to a new survey.

 

Four out of 10 Americans between the ages of 65 to 100 who are thinking about using a medical monitoring device said they would prefer that a clinician teach them how to use the technology, according to a recent survey. The poll also showed that 29% said they would like to receive training from friends or family.


The recently published Linkage Technology Survey, Age 65 to 100, relied on responses from 1,789 seniors, and revealed that 41% of respondents owned a PC and 61% owned a cell phone. However, adoption of other technologies lags behind with 33% indicating they have Internet access. Furthermore, only 3% said they own a smart phone, 3% said they own a tablet, and 8% said they have a laptop.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Why my EMR is still an island

Why my EMR is still an island | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Ever since I ended up in a Florida ER with a misdiagnosis of end-stage congestive heart failure four years ago, I have been keeping tabs on efforts to provide doctors anywhere with access to my most up-to-date medical records during an emergency away from home.

 

At that time the hospital I was visiting didn't have an electronic medical records (EMR) system and had no direct access to my records back home. I was disappointed to discover that four years after that incident things haven't gotten much better.

 

My health care provider did have an EMR system at the time The hospital in Florida did not. But the systems my provider uses were not fully electronic, so all of my data wasn't in my EMR. And that record only reflected activity with my primary care provider and the specialists within that hospital. Activities with other local providers were not integrated

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Why Would Government Launch an Open Source EHR Community?

Why Would Government Launch an Open Source EHR Community? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Last summer, the US Department of Veterans Affairs launched OSEHRA, the central governing body of a new open source software community focused on electronic health records. The community is growing rapidly, with more than 750 members from industry, government, and academia so far. VA has contributed its VistA EHR software, and many community members are engaged in everything from refactoring VistA code to working out the architecture of future EHRs.

 

The care and feeding of OSEHRA’s new open source community will be the subject of a case study at the upcoming Open Source Think Tank.

 

But why would a government agency start down this untrodden path to begin with?

 

VistA, is central to the quality of care that VA delivers to Veterans at 152 hospitals and more than 900 outpatient clinics. It was designed by clinicians for clinicians and embodies the patient-centric clinical workflow that supports VA’s models of care.

However, VistA’s rate of innovation has slowed substantially, even at a time when new models of care are continuously developed and deployed to include new technology – from mobile devices and wireless communications – and new services – from specialized care for traumatic brain injury to outreach to rural Veterans.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

The Mobile Health App Revolution: Why and How

The Mobile Health App Revolution: Why and How | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

A simple glance at James McGinnis's famous pie chart shows that behavior has dramatically more impact on health (measured by premature death) than does the quality of one's health care.

 

Yet, our nation's health expenditures continue to be directed disproportionately at the 10% slice. The simple reason for this is that we have tangible tools to deal with this fraction; we build facilities and fill them with personnel equipped to diagnose and treat this 10%, and we use medical schools to train physicians to run these facilities. We might do the same for the 40%, but we lack the tangible tools to do so (illustrated by the question mark below).

 

Since apps and other digital technologies have had such dramatic impact on other behaviors (witness all those hunched over their phones in elevators, streets, and dinner tables), it's certainly worth a try to apply them towards health behavior.

 

What about the role of medical school?

 

SUNY Upstate's teaching hospital is proudly constructing a new cancer center (illustrated in the graphics above), which is a welcome development for many in Upstate New York. It is inconceivable that a medical student will develop a new chemotherapy treatment or diagnostic modality, although they most certainly may help such developments in the lab.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

9 New Life-Saving Technologies for Doctors

9 New Life-Saving Technologies for Doctors | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

In the past two years, there has been a great leap forward in mobile medical technology, primarily catalyzed by the introduction of iPads. About 75 percent of US physicians now own an iOS device, according to a Manhattan Research study released last year, and they are increasingly using them professionally.


There are ample reasons why iPads should replace physician's clipboards. The iPad is more adaptable, portable, and dramatically more affordable than the medical equipment it's capable of replacing. It's even been proven to increase the efficiency of resident physicians.


While Android- and Windows-powered tablets and smartphones are certainly as capable as their iOS counterparts, they haven't had as successful medical careers. Part of the credit goes to Afshad Mistri, Apple's medical market manager. Early in his career, Mistri was an applications engineer on the Tomahawk Cruise Missile program and now he's just as focused on making the iPad an intermediary in the medical device market. That middleman role is an important distinction; the iPad skirts the line of medical devices since it's the apps themselves, not the iPad, that need FDA approval to be used by the medical profession. And that's how Apple wants it. FDA classification of the iPad would subject not just the iPad but also Apple to a set of byzantine rules and regulations that could easily stand in the way of innovation.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

4 ways to use Evernote for your hospital’s social media work flow

4 ways to use Evernote for your hospital’s social media work flow | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

How I use Evernote to manage my social work flow:

 

Use the unique Evernote email address attached to my account for all my social account email contacts. This way once someone DMs me on Twitter, it flows right into Evernote.


I setup an "Inbox" and made it my default folder so all those notifications coming in fall into a folder where I can deal with them.


Once I review my Evernote Inbox, I can file them in any way I want. I have a hierarchy of folders, for most of the routine stuff, called …wait for it…"notifications."


The great part of all of this is now (along with all my other notes in Evernote) my social notifications are searchable.

 


Other folders in Evernote that have a close tie to my daily life as a social media advisor:

 

HTML—I keep code I use over and over again in client CMSs handy this way


Best Practices—Great place to accumulate case studies, white papers, and best practices


Screen Shots—OCR searchable graphics and images—how great is that.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

5 tips for creating a strategic plan for IT

A strategic plan is crucial to the success of an organization's IT, but today's healthcare landscape is calling for a more patient-centered approach to planning for information technology. In fact, Sue Sutton, president and CEO of Tower Strategies, believes the future of IT planning should focus on an inclusive approach -- all while optimizing workflows, playing up social media, and keeping staff needs in mind.

 

Sutton breaks down five tips for creating a strategic plan for IT.

 

1. Think about the patient experience.

 

What's interesting right now, said Sutton, is how patient experience is one of the "major" challenges in most healthcare organizations. "And many organizations haven't thought through how information technology can support and improve the patient experience," she said. When considering the cultural change the organization is bound to experience when taking on new IT, Sutton said it's crucial to consider what can be done electronically to support patients, whether they're in the facility or not. "This is through kiosks, tablet devices, and more," she said. Another tip she suggested was employing patient focus groups to gauge what patients want to see most when it comes to hospital IT. "I'm not sure that IT [departments have] really thought about [the fact] that one of their customers is really the patients," she said. "They've been thinking their customers are the staff. There are so many tools that are patient-facing or potentially patient-facing that they haven't leveraged."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Acquisitions bolster moves by big contractors in health IT space -- Washington Technology

Acquisitions bolster moves by big contractors in health IT space -- Washington Technology | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Acquisitions and other strategic moves position the largest government contractors for growing health IT opportunities.

 

When General Dynamics acquired Vangent Inc. last summer, the company not only gained new technical capabilities and a portfolio of contracts in the government health information technology space, it landed a top-tier executive with health IT expertise to guide its growing presence in that slice of the market.

 

Kerry Weems, who headed Vangent’s health solutions division, moved over to General Dynamics Information Technology after the merger and became vice president of GDIT’s Health Solutions Sector. Prior to his tenure Vangent, Weems spent 28 years with the federal government and was administrator of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services and vice chairman of the American Health Information Community. During that time, he implemented the Medicare e-prescribing program, started pilot projects in electronic health records and personal health records and implemented landmark payment reforms, including non-payment for certain medical errors.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Making medication alerts in electronic medical record systems more useful and usable

Making medication alerts in electronic medical record systems more useful and usable | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

A study by Regenstrief Institute and U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs investigators provides the first in-depth look at how health care providers react to medication alerts generated by electronic medical record systems.

 

Medication alerts provide the health care team with computer-generated information on a variety of drug-related issues. Among the most common medication alerts are warnings about patient allergies, drug interactions and duplicate prescriptions. The alerts, critical to patient safety, can be triggered by many factors including the prescription of a new medication or a change in a patient's laboratory test results.

 

But health care providers may experience alert fatigue and unintentionally overlook important alerts if the electronic medical record system generates too many medication alerts; if alerts do not apply to the patient (for example, warning about a drug the patient has already been taking without problems); or if the alert provides too much extra information. The goal is to develop alerts that aid healthcare providers more effectively and enhance patient safety.

 

"Prescribers' Interactions With Medication Alerts at the Point of Prescribing: A Multi-Method, In Situ Investigation of the Human-Computer Interaction" appears in the April 2012 issue of the International Journal of Medical Informatics.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Social Gaming Helps The Medicine Go Down

Social Gaming Helps The Medicine Go Down | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Several imaginative mobile apps turn preventive health into competitive fun.

 

To set themselves apart from the competition, many mobile health apps are adding gaming and social networking features to make the "medicine" taste better.


Take the fitness app HealthPer, which was just released. Now available at Apple's iTunes store and designed for iPad, iPhone, and iTouch devices, HealthPer can help you maintain a healthy lifestyle while sharing achievements online with friends

 

Social gaming of all kinds is exploding, according to a 2011 survey. Twenty percent of females and 15% of males are social gamers; and, although the biggest chunk of this audience is 16- to 34-year-olds, some older people also like social gaming. Sports gaming is the most popular category, but healthcare is an up-and-coming field, to judge by the proliferation of healthcare gaming apps.


For example, there's a program called Skimble that brings together people who like to work out and engage in various sports. Designed for iPhones, Androids, and desktop usage on the Web, Skimble lets you track your activities and share them with other people who have common interests. Its screens resemble Facebook

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

What are your top tips for digital marketing success?

Digital marketing is ever-evolving, tracking along with technology trends and revolutions. Now, more than ever, the customer is in the content driver’s seat. They’re used to using technology that suits them, choosing their own “adventure,” sampling experiences, and selecting the content and tools with which they feel are worthy of engaging. Americans have become savvier digital content consumers and even savvier digital health consumers. Digital is increasingly adopted to streamline virtually all aspects of patient care, including:


• Robust health information portals: While the rise of these portals and depth of information, tools, and resources offered may create a self-empowered patient culture, they also lead to health information overload and the customer demand for immediate access to digestible information.


• Waiting room experience: In an effort to streamline the waiting room process and improve patient satisfaction levels, many hospitals and offices are digitizing their queue to keep visits streamlined, paperwork fulfilled, and patients informed of their queue.


• Professional consultations: HCPs are increasingly reliant on mobile devices and reliable resources to augment patient consults. Their access to information to support a differential diagnosis, determine formulary access, and explain medical concepts to patients is becoming critical in practice.


• Clinical trial reporting: Digital tools and communities are streamlining the sharing and discussion of trial results amongst professional participants and enables research.


• Ongoing patient tracking: Patients are often tracking their health behaviors on their mobile and via online tools, while others are engaging in eConsults affording HCPs an unprecedented level of patient tracking.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Docs need to learn more health IT competency earlier

Docs need to learn more health IT competency earlier | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Quality improvement and patient-centered care—two concepts essential to the health reform effort—will require health IT. Current and future physicians must master the minimal competencies required to use health IT if the healthcare system is to reach its quality and cost containment goals, according to an article in the March edition of Health Affairs.

 

“Health IT is becoming integral to the practice of medicine. But, current medical education and professional development curricula do not systematically prepare physicians to use EHRs and the data these systems collect,” wrote Pierce Graham-Jones, project officer with the Beacon Community Program at the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC), and colleagues.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Mobile tools are changing health care

Mobile tools are changing health care | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Can your smartphone replace your doctor? Probably not, but they can make his or her job a whole lot easier. And make you healthier, too.

 

According to Research2Guidance.com, there are approximately 15,000 consumer health apps available today - 25% of which are free. The consulting firm predicts as many as 500 million people will be using health care mobile apps by 2015.

 

That sounds about right to Dr. Eric Topol, a California cardiologist who, in his new book, The Creative Destruction of Medicine, writes we will soon be checking our vital signs on our phones.

This revolution in medicine, he said in a phone interview, is about "rebooting medicine" so patients will finally be able to take charge of their health.

 

"Now we have these new tools including sensors that can talk to your phone and measure any metric that makes you tick," Topol says. "We have all these new tools that can basically lay out the whole story of an individual, from what they're at risk for, what medications might work, what will cause side effects."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Latest healthcare 'meaningful use' rules require patient involvement

Latest healthcare 'meaningful use' rules require patient involvement | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

he latest set of proposed government rules to push healthcare providers to roll out electronic health records (EHRs) requires that patients use the digital technology.

 

Health insurance specialist Robert Anthony detailed the nuances of Stage 2 rules during a webinar this week sponsored by the National eHealth Collaborative.

 

Last month, the U.S. government's Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) published to the Federal Register the second of three sets of guidelines that the healthcare community must follow in rolling out EHRs. Stage 2 proposed rules are currently undergoing a six-month comment period.

 

Anthony, who works for the CMS, said Stage 2 rules require healthcare providers to offer EHR access to more than half of their patients. Clinics and private practices must also prove at least 10% of their patients are actually accessing healthcare information on EHRs. That includes radiological imaging results, which can be accessed directly in an EHR or through a link in the EHR to the images.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

mHealth enthusiasm: Is the industry overhyped?

The joys of mHealth are many. CIOs nationwide are testing smartphone programs, tablet deployment, and remote patient monitoring projects in droves. They are real projects with potentially real outcomes.


But the rhetoric surrounding mHealth continues to be overblown, according to three experts' opinions we ran across over the past couple of weeks. And those individuals have a point: Mobile technology in healthcare has generated an enthusiasm that far outstrips its established benefits just yet.

For example, a blog post written earlier this month by Sanjay Basu, M.D., Ph.D. at EpiAnalysis, points out that proponents are wildly excited about the potential for smartphone-enabled healthcare monitoring, diagnosis and tracking in the developing world, particularly in deeply rural settings. But mobile technologies, he says "are just likely to be widely hyped but used by individuals in limited contexts as another tool for good practice rather than a panacea to global health problems.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Survey Providers say electronic health records improve care, but culture of paper is embedded

Survey Providers say electronic health records improve care, but culture of paper is embedded | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The majority of healthcare professionals believe that electronic health records improve patient care, but most are still using paper records, a new survey says.

 

Sixty-three percent of healthcare professionals said they spend up to 75% on their time on paperwork, according to a survey done by digital transcription company Anoto Group. More than 75% said they believed the Affordable Care Act would increase the amount of time spent on paperwork.

 

Barriers to implementing EHRs, according to the survey respondents, included the high financial cost of adoption, worries about disruption of care and the belief that paper is too embedded in the culture of care.

 

EHRs were discussed at the 2012 McKnight's Online Expo session. You can hear or download the slides from the presentation by clicking here.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Telemedicine Predicted in 1925

Telemedicine Predicted in 1925 | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The 1920s was an incredible decade of advancement for communications technology. Radio was finally being realized as a broadcast medium, talkies were transforming the film industry, and inventors were tinkering with the earliest forms of television. People of the 1920s recognized that big changes were ahead, and no one relished in guessing what those changes might be more than Hugo Gernsback.

 

Gernsback was a pioneer in both radio and publishing, always pushing the boundaries of what the public might expect of their technological future. In 1905 (just a year after emigrating to the U.S. from Germany at the age of 20) Gernsback designed the first home radio set and started the first mail-order radio business in the world. The radio was called the Telimco Wireless and was advertised in magazines like Scientific American for $7.50 (about $180 today).

 

In 1908 Gernsback put out the world’s first radio magazine, Modern Electronics. Distributed by the American News Company, Modern Electronics was a huge hit and was said to be profitable from its first issue. In 1909 he opened the first radio storefront in New York, supplementing his mail-order radio sales by selling radio parts to amateur radio operators in the city.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

User-Centered EHR Design Considered Harmful (Try Process-Centered Instead)

User-Centered EHR Design Considered Harmful (Try Process-Centered Instead) | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Credited father of user- or human-centered system design (variously HCD, UCD, HCSD, or HCD), Donald Norman (DN) wrote a contrarian essay in 2005 (“Human-centered Design Considered Harmful”) offering an alternative vision of usability and design he called “activity-centered design.” Business process management (BPM) and workflow management systems presuppose activity-centered perspectives. I’ve argued that EHRs and HIT usability will benefit from these ideas and technologies. So I’ve titled this essay, User-Centered EHR Design Considered Harmful (Try Process-Centered Instead).

 

For an overview of user-centered EHR design, skim my annotated tweets from NIST’s workshop on EHR usability. Dive into UCD’s original 1986 opus “User-Centered System Design” (the initials for which also stand for University of California at San Diego, DN’s then academic home). But I also recommend “Design for Success: A Human-Centered Approach to Designing Successful Products and Systems” by William Rouse (my adviser during a graduate degree in Industrial Engineering).

more...
No comment yet.

Would you like me to help you?

Please fill this short form and I will get in touch with you