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healthcare technology
The ways in which technology benefits healthcare
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How does a Website help Promote a Gynaecology practice

How does a Website help Promote a Gynaecology practice Examples of Features on Websites by Gynaecs which help Patients, enchant visitors and ensure they get more visibility

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5 Ways to Engage Patients with Social Media

5 Ways to Engage Patients with Social Media | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The success of any social media campaign can be summed up in one word: engagement. An engaging post will generate conversation, is more likely to be shared and can open your social network to more viewers—and potential patients!

 

Here are our 5 favorite ways to engage patients with social media:


1. Host a contest:
Hosting a contest is one of the most popular ways to engage your social media fan base. If there’s a strong incentive to “like” your page, you’ll not only acquire more fans, but have more fans checking back on a regular basis.

Before deciding to host a contest, you may want to take a look at Facebook’s promotion guideline.

A simpler, less time-consuming alternative to hosting a contest is asking your audience trivia questions. Even if you’re not offering an incentive, trivia questions are likely to get a response.

 

2. Ask questions:
Asking for tips and questions from your audience is a great way to get patients involved. Ask them to share their healthiest recipe or favorite fitness routine. This will generate conversation that leads back to your social network!

 

3. Share information in terms fans and followers can understand:
It’s essential to understand your target patient. Knowing how they communicate is important when composing your posts. Using terms your patients can comprehend is crucial in engaging them, because if they don’t understand, they won’t get involved!

 

4. Publish guest blog posts by patients:
Something perhaps more out of the ordinary is reaching out to your past and present patients and asking them to share their stories on your blog or social networks. Publishing these posts by patients can be extremely successful in appealing to readers. The chance of them emotionally relating to another patient is more likely than them relating to you as their healthcare provider.

 

5. Designate time to answer questions:
Make yourself available at the same time daily or weekly to answer questions. Other options to consider are creating tweet chats about designated topics with easy to follow hashtags, e.g. #HighBloodPressure, or even Google+ Hangouts. Google+ Hangouts provide a more interactive forum to connect with patients. You can video chat with numerous users at one time to answer questions and talk healthcare!

 

What types of posts do you find are most engaging to your patients?

 

 

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Do's and Dont's for Physicians on Facebook

Do's and Dont's for Physicians on Facebook | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

So finally Social Media has hit the spot with doctors. Its the first form of technology which Doctors have adopted worldwide on their own( without pressure, incentives or kickbacks.)

 

Recent statistics show that while 87% of the physicians surveyed reported using Social media for personal purposes, a significant 67% also claimed to be using it for Professional use. Social Media has ushered healthcare into an exciting world of free expression and multi faceted communication

 

There have also been some unfortunate cases coming to light, where doctors have been penalized for overdoing it on Social Media. Also 45 % of the organizations surveyed claimed to have no policy for Social Media. In this article we'll look at some do's and don'ts for Physicians so that they can use Facebook safely and not let it cause legal problems for themselves in the future.

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Digital revolution takes on medical records

Digital revolution takes on medical records | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

For decades, technology has advanced the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of patient illnesses and diseases in the medical field.

 

Yet the documentation of patient care has remained mired in the archaic process of handwritten notes — until now.

 

A 2009 law aimed at creating electronic medical records and linking the information to key parties also provided some $20 billion in funding to get doctors and hospitals to convert from handwritten to electronic records.

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Physicians and Blogging

Physicians and Blogging | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

So why should a Physican blog? What can a Physician Blog about ?

 

Physicians as professionals, learn something unique and interesting everyday. They should blog because they have experiences which are fascinating and stories which are unique; that people want to hear.

 

They should blog so that medical students and the younger upcoming physicians learn from their experiences. They should blog because if they don't, they will be wasting an opportunity that is available today to archive the information they possess.

 

A Physician can blog to educate, to share their vision, to market themselves and their practices, or simply show that they have a human side ...

 

A Blog can help you build a physicians online presence faster than any other method today. Its the natural extension to a website and due to its sticky nature, helps create an engaging presence

 

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Is It Time for a Health App Store?

Is It Time for a Health App Store? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

In these cash strapped times, we’re all looking for money whenever we can find it. And few organizations have been hit harder than charities and Not for Profit organizations. So we try and make a point of highlighting “win-win” propositions that help out worth organizations while also helping consumers.

 

Case in point, we received information from the American Diabetes Association about their new Facebook App, a Diabetes Risk Test that helps raise awareness about the risk factors for Type 2 diabetes. The test is easy and free (heck you don’t even have to leave Facebook to take it). And best of all, the ADA receives $5 from a corporate sponsor for every test that’s taken. What worthy organization is helping the ADA with their funding, you ask? Why Boar’s Head delicatessen meats, of course.

 

Say what? With all the efforts being undertaken by Pharma companies when it comes to Diabetes education, Boar’s Head was the only partner the ADA could find? That seems pretty bizarre. especially when the next suggested step after taking the test is to participate in a program called “CheckUp America” which is partially sponsored by Janssen. You know the same Janssen that our pal John Mack was chastising for getting out of the Facebook business a couple of weeks ago. In fact, John’s blog has been full of initiatives by Roche, Sanofi and others to improve diabetes education using digital technology.

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Researchers study the feasibility of mobile robotic telemedicine in the NICU

Telemedicine has been used in a wide array of clinical applications to help eliminate geographic barriers and improve access to services that would often not be otherwise consistently available.

 

To see if this technology is feasible for use in the field of neonatal medicine, neonatologists at the Children’s Hospital in Los Angeles, CA implemented a study to describe the use of a wireless, mobile, robotic telecommunications system in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).

 

The study utilized 304 patient encounters with 46 preterm and term new born infants, also known as neonates, in a level IIIa NICU. An “on-site” bedside neonatologist (ONSN) and an “off-site” neonatologist located at a distant location (OFFSN) evaluated selected demographic information, laboratory data and clinical and radiological findings of the subjects.

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4 tips for start-up health IT companies

Start-up health IT companies have made quite a splash this past year – with some even claiming they have the ability to change the healthcare industry as we know it. Programs have been launched to help fledgling companies grow, and now the focus has shifted onto how these organizations can increase innovation and improve health and wellness.

 

Lisa Suennen, managing member at venture capital firm Psilos Group and author of the blog Venture Valkyrie, outlines four basic tips for start-up health IT companies.

 

1. Have a business model. It sounds basic, said Suennen, but you'd be surprised how many companies fail to complete this step. "I have so many companies [who don't do that], it blows my mind," she said. "I ask how they're going to get paid, and they go, 'We're going to figure that out after the pilot.' Our reaction is 'No, that's not so good.'" She added when creating a business model, it's essential to identify who the customer is, "because you can't build a proper product without knowing your customer, and the customer is who pays you." On her blog, Suennen writes that many companies will find themselves revising their business model – something that's completely normal during their early years. "Truth of the matter is that the average start-up company typically goes through more than one attempt at the brass ring," she wrote. "Early business models often fail and entrepreneurs go back to the drawing board and reinvent their original vision."

 

2. Don't depend on the consumer for your revenue. According to Suennen, during the early years of a company, the consumer shouldn't be depended on for significant revenue. "It's not yet time to depend on the consumer for your revenue model," she said. "They're just not ready, and they won't deliver the revenue to you yet. Consumer-directed health IT products are struggling and people aren't ready to pay."

 

3. Recognize a start-up's role in job creation. On her blog, Suennen writes that start-up companies are playing a critical role in job creation. In fact, she wrote, firms less than five years old have created about 40 million American jobs over the past three decades, accounting for almost all of the net new jobs during that period. "That's a pretty stunning fact," she wrote. "In a world where there is no way out of the healthcare crisis except through the generation of new ideas to solve our healthcare problems, young companies are the golden ticket to new employment."

 

4. Know the path to success isn't always straight and narrow. "To be honest, I haven't yet seen a company that had a straight, upward and to the right pointing line from start to finish," Suennen wrote. Instead, based on her experiences, Suennen said most companies leaving her firm have seen rather unconventional paths to success. "The line looks more like the path taken by a blindfolded cat chasing after a highly uncoordinated mouse – the roundabout, back and forth and a little bit spastic," she wrote. "Start-up companies are a little bit like that story about the six blind guys and the elephant: you get a different story about it, depending on when you touch it." She concluded by pointing almost all successful start-ups have seen their fair share of trying times. "I don't think I could point to a single example of a company that we count among our success and claim that it didn't try to commit suicide at least once along the way."

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Avoid EHR Disasters: How Reliable are your EHR Patient Notes?

A disturbing number of EHR issues and medical professional liability claims are based on serious problems with exam notes and other clinical documentation recorded in an EHR. Regardless of the legitimacy of care and treatment, the inappropriate use of EHRs and/or EHR design vulnerabilities are exposing physicians to questions on the quality of care and physician due diligence. Some key areas to consider follow:

 

Initial Patient Charting:

In some cases, the transition of the patient information to the EHR was not adequately structured: resulting in serious omissions in the patient EHR based record. For example, few physicians consider the patient care information and history that is needed to provide proper context in the EHR for a patient. Previous surgical history and access to previous test results may be critical information to support continuity of care. However, if the historical information is not properly entered, then the EHR will not provide appropriate warnings and notifications to the staff and physician.

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Hospitals Find their Place on Pinterest

Hospitals Find their Place on Pinterest | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The great thing about Pinterest, from a marketer's perspective, is that the demographics skew slightly older and wealthier than Facebook and Twitter. More than 67% of users are 25 or older and 28% of users earn at least $100,000 per year. The site averages one million visitors every day. (To learn more about Pinterest's demographic breakdown, check out the nifty infographic on Mashable.)

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Health Monitoring at Helsinki Hospital in Finland - Mobile Health Around the Globe

Health Monitoring at Helsinki Hospital in Finland - Mobile Health Around the Globe | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

A study is presently being conducted by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland at Sipoo Health Centre and Helsinki University Hospital to determine if patient self-management with the help of mobile phones can serve as motivation for wellness and adoption of healthy lifestyle behavior.

 

Remote patient monitoring (RPM) has been considered a highly potential and cost-effective means to increase patient's motivation for self-care.

 

Patients are asked to submit various test results (e.g. blood pressure) to healthcare professionals by mobile phone, and are given feedback on them. In this way, healthcare professionals can respond to a patient’s condition even before the patient seeks treatment.

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Professionalism in the Use of Social Media

The Internet has created the ability for medical students and physicians to communicate and share information quickly and to reach millions of people easily.

 

Participating in social networking and other similar Internet opportunities can support physicians’ personal expression, enable individual physicians to have a professional presence online, foster collegiality and camaraderie within the profession, provide opportunity to widely disseminate public health messages and other health communication.

 

Social networks, blogs, and other forms of communication online also create new challenges to the patient-physician relationship.

 

 

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The Art of EHR Implementation

While each EHR is different in terms of workflow, training, and usage, there are certain steps one can take in order to ensure a successful and smooth transition from paper charts to digital. From my experience working in HealthIT, here are 7 steps I recommend taking when selecting AND implementing an EHR into your practice.

 

The first major step in the EHR adoption pathway is forming an EHR Selection Committee. I can assure you that forming a committee is NOT a waste of time and resources. Who takes part of your selection committee is a matter of personal preference and staff abilities, however, you should consider including a technology consultant (“the IT guy”), members of your nursing staff, as well as other providers within the practice. Think of adopting an EHR as marriage. Through thick and thin, for better or for worse. You want to make sure you get it right the first time as divorcing your EHR and finding someone else could be a painstaking process.


The selection committee should focus on two key aspects: a) what are the characteristics of a suitable EHR for your practice?; b) what is an acceptable, achievable timeline for implementation? You must be specific in the types of functions your EHR will have. You must also make sure that the new piece of software will have as little impact in your day-day workflow as possible (keep in mind that NO EHR will be able to leave your workflow unchanged….it’s just the nature of software).


Once your selection committee is set, it’s important to begin talking about an implementation roadmap. By when should the team identify a suitable EHR for your practice? Who are the key players that will first learn the system? How will you go about data transfer or conversion? Will there be a consultant involved or is it done in-house?


The Keystone User(s) - once you’ve selected your EHR, it will be important to designate at least one keystone user that will be the “subject matter expert” in your office. While you can always get get on the phone to call support, having someone knowledgeable in the office will always serve you best. The keystone user will be the “go-to person” when new features are released and people need updates.


Test Groups - depending on the size of your practice, it may be a good idea to first do a trial run with just one doctor. This will help you learn the system better, tweak your implementation process and have a clean transition for the other doctors in the practice. Someone has to be the guinea pig right?


Training Staff - when the dotted line is signed, you need to make sure that everyone on your team is trained in using the system. One loose cog in the wheel and your progress toward Meaningful Use can be seriously impaired. Getting your staff trained in a timely fashion will not only ensure accurate chart completion, but will also promote a steadfast movement toward successful MU attestation.


GoLive - once your staff is trained, its time to hit the stage! All of your keystone users should be present during your golive period to ensure a smooth transition from the old fashioned paper charts to your brand new EHR system.

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Why Facebook should be a template for electronic medical records

Why Facebook should be a template for electronic medical records | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

It sounds like Facebook would make a great starting template for a vast interconnected medical records system. But the reality is that the electronic medical record (EMR) industry is still stuck in the era of the BBS.

 

The similarities between modern EMRs and the BBS system are striking. Like many old Bulletin Board Systems the vast majority of EMR systems do not communicate with each other (nor even the outside world). Not only are they often incapable of communicating with another EMR or computer but even in 2012 most new EMRs don’t even have an option for sharing information with other systems! This is one of the biggest paradoxes and failures of almost all EMRs. Designed for an industry where the sharing of medical information among different facilities and health care providers is critical to the timely, effective, and safe delivery of medical care, the majority of these systems are designed to share information only within the limited confines of the specific facility or health care system that they serve. EMRs are essentially information islands cut off almost completely from direct contact with the rest of the interconnected world.

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Social Media in Medical Education

Slides from presentation to University of Utah School of Medicine faculty on the usefulness of social media in medical education.

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Are Smartphones Distracting Doctors?

Doctor, what do you think? Doctor? Doctor?

 

These are words uttered by a number of patients today as doctors use an increasing number of “screens” while simultaneously interacting with their patients.

 

These screens offer access to mobile devices such as touchpads, smartphones, and laptop computers. During the already restricted time that patients have with doctors, they are now being asked to compete with such devices.

 

The question for researchers, clinicians, hospital administrators, and most importantly patients is: does this integration of new devices distract doctors or enhance the care they provide to patients?

 

This article reviews this issue and prospects for future research.

 

The Article : http://www.imedicalapps.com/2012/04/smartphones-distracting-doctors/

 

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Why Would Government Launch an Open Source EHR Community?

Why Would Government Launch an Open Source EHR Community? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Last summer, the US Department of Veterans Affairs launched OSEHRA, the central governing body of a new open source software community focused on electronic health records. The community is growing rapidly, with more than 750 members from industry, government, and academia so far. VA has contributed its VistA EHR software, and many community members are engaged in everything from refactoring VistA code to working out the architecture of future EHRs.

 

The care and feeding of OSEHRA’s new open source community will be the subject of a case study at the upcoming Open Source Think Tank.

 

But why would a government agency start down this untrodden path to begin with?

 

VistA, is central to the quality of care that VA delivers to Veterans at 152 hospitals and more than 900 outpatient clinics. It was designed by clinicians for clinicians and embodies the patient-centric clinical workflow that supports VA’s models of care.

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My Health Checklist 2012 app contains evidence based preventative health advice for patients

How low should my cholesterol be? Should my father be screened for prostate cancer?

Does my daughter need the HPV vaccine?

 

Should my wife be screened for ovarian cancer?

 

Do any members of my family need folic acid, and if so, how much?

 

These are just several examples of the many questions and concerns that adults may have about preventive health and health maintenance for themselves and their loved ones.

 

The US Department of Health and Human Services provides the AHRQ-ePSS App (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality – electronic Preventive Services Selector) for healthcare professionals, but today we review an analogous app that seeks to provide non-healthcare professionals with information on preventive health and health maintenance.

 

Targeted primarily towards non-healthcare professionals, the My Health Checklist 2012 App comes to us from Proven Health Ways.

 

Its trademark is this website developed by Dr. Paul Hartlaub, a preventive medicine physician, to provide consumers with reliable information on “what really works to prevent disease.”

 

Browsing the Proven Health Ways website reveals a dedication to evidence-based recommendations, including reliance on the reputable United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP).

 

More at http://www.imedicalapps.com/2012/04/health-checklist-2012-app-review-preventative-health-advice-evidencebased/ ;

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RxEOB: Mobile soon to be necessary part of ‘meaningful use’ | mobihealthnews

RxEOB: Mobile soon to be necessary part of ‘meaningful use’ | mobihealthnews | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

So far, incentive program for “meaningful use” of electronic health records has not required any mobile component, nor may it ever, but mobility is fast becoming a de facto necessity for achieving meaningful use in many clinical settings.

 

“I’m not sure how [physicians] do that without having access to [EHRs] wherever they are,” Robert Oscar, CEO of RxEOB, a Richmond, Va., company that makes Web-based and mobile applications mostly to help consumers understand the pharmacy benefits of their health insurance, says in an interview with MobiHealthNews.

 

Doctors will use their mobile devices to view and update the EHRs in their practices as well as connect to the hospitals they practice at and admit patients to. “They’re going to need mobile apps,” Oscar says. “The concept that they’re going to carry around a laptop or sit at a desk all the time just doesn’t seem feasible to me.”

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The Sounds of Silence: Are Patients Getting the Information They Need?

Health care information technology can provide mountains of data, but does that data help patients make better health care decisions? Do physicians and patients engage in the kind of dialogue that truly is shared decision-making?

 

his is supposed to be the Age of the Empowered Patient. Websites of all kinds offer evaluations of hospitals, physicians and other providers. Data reporting — mandatory and voluntary — is producing heaps of information that patients are supposed to use in their health care decisions.

 

Initiatives such as patient-centered care, accountable care organizations, report cards and high-deductible health plans all are designed to make patients more involved in their care, in the hope that having "skin in the game" (financially or otherwise) will lead them to make more rational choices. Shared decision-making by patients and providers together is all the rage among the pundits and theoreticians.

 

Is It Working?

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The Many Platforms of Social Media in Healthcare

The Many Platforms of Social Media in Healthcare | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Social media in health care began with the formation of a number of interactive web sites, including SERMO, and iMedXchange some time ago. SERMO and iMedXchange are more formal, and almost a peer reviewed forum requiring authorization and proof of a medical license. They cover subjects organized by specialty category and have business management and policy reform categories.

 

One could also include the many ‘listserv’ forums as social media, although not immediately interactive it functioned as a ready solution for communications.

 

Chat rooms came into existence in the form of mIRC, AOL messenger, MSN messenger, and other chats in Facebook, and Skype

 

If today’ s most popular social media is considered, Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, Tumbler, and Foursquare come to mind.

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masti92.com/chat-room/ a complete decent and family chat room

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How to discuss online health information with your physician

How to discuss online health information with your physician | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
Everyday I get to learn about new articles and websites that are claiming to have reputable health information.

 

Two articles recently caught my eye while I was spending some time on Twitter. First, an op-ed piece was published on Time.com discussing how patients and doctors perceive the use of the online health information. The article was closely followed by the results of a recent PEW research study which stated that 80% of Americans used the internet to “prepare for or recover from” their doctor visit.

 

The results of the PEW study were less than surprising to me. Everyday I have a concerned mom or anxious dad refer to something they have read online.

 

Everyday.

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How doctors should adopt new technology

How doctors should adopt new technology | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
My primary care physician, the last time I was in for a checkup, had not adopted ePrescribing or started using an electronic health record (EHR). My understanding is that the medical group to which he belongs had not rolled out these capabilities to him yet but was planning to do so. Hopefully, this summer when I see him again he will be plugged into the electronic health record that the group is adopting.

 

Although he may not be happy about having to adapt to this new way of working, I will be happy because it provides another layer of safety for me as a patient. For instance, the risks of miscommunication between my doctor and my pharmacy will be greatly reduced. From my experience as a quality and productivity expert, I know that there will be many benefits for his practice group. As the American Medical Association has shown in a white paper my physician may not be spending much less time handling prescriptions, but his office staff surely will. Overall, there will be a significant gain in productivity and safety for the office.

 

After examining this example of the adoption of technology at my physician’s office group I recognize several challenges that the group faces, many of which are common to any enterprise adopting new technology faces, including not just healthcare providers but also small businesses and nonprofit organizations:

 

Will the new technology increase productivity?

 

Will there be a positive return on investment?

 

Will the new technology improve patient safety?

 

If the technology is adopted, how should it be rolled out or implemented?

 

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Physicians on Facebook - Do's and Dont's for #hcsm

Physicians on Facebook - Do's and Dont's for #hcsm | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

So finally Social Media has hit the spot with doctors. Its the first form of technology which Doctors have adopted worldwide on their own( without pressure, incentives or kickbacks.)

 

Recent statistics show that while 87% of the physicians surveyed reported using Social media for personal purposes, a significant 67% also claimed to be using it for Professional use. Social Media has ushered healthcare into an exciting world of free expression and multi faceted communication

 

There have also been some unfortunate cases coming to light, where doctors have been penalized for overdoing it on Social Media. Also 45 % of the organizations surveyed claimed to have no policy for Social Media. In this article we'll look at some do's and don'ts for Physicians so that they can use Facebook safely and not let it cause legal problems for themselves in the future.

 

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Smart Ways To Deal With Dumb Clinical Alerts

Smart Ways To Deal With Dumb Clinical Alerts | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Clinical alerts may help reduce dangerous drug interactions, but sometimes they cause more problems than they solve. Experts describe best practices to make them work better.

 

Clinicians, whether young or old, technophobes or technophiles, continue to complain about the avalanche of unnecessary alerts they get when walking through a clinical decision support or e-prescribing system. It's not uncommon to hear a cardiologist, for instance, complain: "I've been practicing for 15 years. I don't need to be cautioned about ordering aspirin for a patient at risk of hemorrhagic stroke."

 

On the flip side, IT leaders and clinicians worry that these systems miss needed alerts because they're incapable of taking into account important free text data from clinicians' notes. Allison McCoy and her colleagues at the Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, give a good example in a recent Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association (JAMIA) report.. They give the example of an infectious disease specialist who orders a powerful antibiotic for a life-threatening infection in a patient with compromised kidney function, and who inserts that fact into the clinician's notes.

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