healthcare technology
121.7K views | +1 today
Follow
healthcare technology
The ways in which technology benefits healthcare
Curated by nrip
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

6 reasons why your hospital needs video content

6 reasons why your hospital needs video content | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

For starters, video content helps generate better search rankings.

 

Let's dive into it:

 

Video is social: Ever hear of a viral video? I'm not saying that every video created needs have this aspect to it, but overall video content is easily shared (especially emotional content).

 

Video is engaging: Compared to text sites, websites with video have a lower bounce rate (59 percent compared to 87 percent) and a higher average time on site (5 minutes compared to 42 seconds).

 

Videos are getting viewed: 83 percent of executives say they are watching more online video today than they were a year ago.

 

Video content is growing: 48 hours of video content uploaded every minute to YouTube in 2011 compared, to 35 hours in 2010 or eight hours in 2007.

 

Video is accessible: With HTML 5, video can easily be viewed across all devices including iPad's and iPhone's.

 

Video will generate better rankings: Forrester research has identified that web pages with video stand a 50 percent better chance than text pages alone of showing up on the first page of Google search results.

 

So now the Question is "Where to place video content?"

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Patient Satisfaction – Simple Steps Hospitals Can Take

Patient Satisfaction – Simple Steps Hospitals Can Take | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Patient Satisfaction in the hospital setting isn’t so hard after all.

 

I just ran across this study from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) that is a massive reinforcement of common sense. Let me ask your opinion …

 

Which do you think would produce better hospital outcomes and patient satisfaction.

 

a) If the nurse waits for patients to push the call button and then takes care of their specific issue?

 

b) If the nurses round regularly, checking in on patients whether they push the call button or not and that this is a routine expectation for the performance of their job?

 

You got it. (b) wins.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

New Media Medicine | MIT Media Lab

How radical new collaborations will catalyze a revolution in health.


Despite amazing advances in medicines and medical technology over the past 50 years, health care is in crisis. Costs are skyrocketing, health outcomes are uneven, and the patient experience is unacceptable. The reason: the historical inequality between medical experts and health-care professionals (particularly doctors) and patients. This inequality was based on information asymmetry: only experts could access medical information and use it to conduct medical research, make diagnoses and develop treatments. The Internet has all but destroyed the information asymmetry, but the inequality remains. At New Media Medicine, we believe that people, working together in creative new ways, can succeed where the medical establishment has failed. As a society, we have dramatically underestimated the power of ordinary people to transform the system, to take care of their own health, to help develop therapies and to help solve massive public health problems. It’s time for a powershift in health care. We are pioneering new media technologies that will enable radical new collaborations between doctors, patients and communities, to catalyze a revolution in human health.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Doctors Urge Their Colleagues To Quit Doing Worthless Tests

Nine national medical groups are launching a campaign called Choosing Wisely to get U.S. doctors to back off on 45 diagnostic tests, procedures and treatments that often may do patients no good.

 

Many involve imaging tests such as CT scans, MRIs and X-rays. Stop doing them, the groups say, for most cases of back pain, or on patients who come into the emergency room with a headache or after a fainting spell, or just because somebody's about to undergo surgery.

 

A child with low belly pain and suspected appendicitis? Don't rush her to the CT scanner. Do an ultrasound first. That will give the answer 94 percent of the time, is cheaper and doesn't expose the child to radiation.

 

Don't put heartburn patients on high doses of acid-suppressing drugs when lower doses and shorter courses will do, they say. You might just be making their symptoms worse when they try to stop the medicine.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

4 Ways Mobile Technology Can Improve Care | Healthcare Information Technology

4 Ways Mobile Technology Can Improve Care | Healthcare Information Technology | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Mobile technology is popular. That in itself is not shocking. The adoption rate of mobile technology has been rapid. You can take one look around and see most people are using smart phones, iPads and tablets.

 

Mobile technology is not new to healthcare either. Although it may not be as prevalent as it is commercially, many physicians and nurses use iPads and smart phones to aid hospital rounds, communicate and guide patients in treatment recommendations.

 

However, there are heated debates over the safety of mobile health. Data security and HIPAA compliance has yet to be tackled, evident in the onslaught of data breaches, and there are many conflicting reports on the clinical safety of mobile health technology. Some studies report that mobile technologies improve workflow and aid physician productivity, yet other studies report that iPads and smart phones are distracting and dangerous to patients.

 

While the safety of mobile health is questionable, there is no denying its market — and that of health applications — is huge. In 2011, the mobile health market reached $718 million in the United States alone. Harnessing the prevalence of mobile technology to meet CMS regulations and meaningful use requirements could greatly benefit the healthcare industry while not compromising medical professionals' productivity or patient privacy.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Interest in Pinterest? How your hospital can use it | Articles

Interest in Pinterest? How your hospital can use it | Articles | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Pinterest is the newest social media darling. You should check it out.

 

Pinterest is a curation tool that allows users to create “boards” where they “pin” items of interest and share them. Boards can be about specific areas of interest, for example “Books I Love.” And the user can “pin” any URL of the book they want to share. Once these books are pinned and added to the “Board,” the board becomes a visual representation of the books the user loves with links. Others can see them and “like” them or “pin” them—meaning they appear on their boards, too.

 

So, how can Pinterest be used in health care?

 

Pinterest has the potential to aggregate diverse content from different parts of the web that help advance education and patient engagement. For example, a birthing center may offer a breastfeeding e-book on their website and an informative video series from their lactation specialist from their YouTube channel. They could pin those on a board called “The Benefits and Basics of Breastfeeding.”

In addition, they could add a pin on their board from the American Academy of Pediatrics and share the AAP’s resource guide on breastfeeding and the La Leche League’s resources. To get creative and take advantage of the visual medium, the Birthing Center may want to highlight some local photographers that have captured the tender images of moms with their newborns breastfeeding.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

4 Ways Mobile Technology Can Improve Care | Healthcare Information Technology

Mobile technology is popular. That in itself is not shocking. The adoption rate of mobile technology has been rapid. You can take one look around and see most people are using smart phones, iPads and tablets.

 

Mobile technology is not new to healthcare either. Although it may not be as prevalent as it is commercially, many physicians and nurses use iPads and smart phones to aid hospital rounds, communicate and guide patients in treatment recommendations.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

HealthIT Standards 101

HealthIT Standards 101 | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

There are a variety of standards used in the Healthcare Industry to enable interoperable exchange of information. IEEE (a standards and professional organization) originally defined interoperability (in perhaps the most oft-quoted definition in Health IT standards) as:

 

The ability of two or more systems or components to exchange information and to use the information that has been exchanged.

 

A more customer focused definition comes from the IEEE website:

 

Ability of a system or a product to work with other systems or products without special effort on the part of the customer. Interoperability is made possible by the implementation of standards.

 

I really like this definition, because it talks about the impact of the standard on the part of the consumer, rather than the innards. The standards these definitions speak of are standards for information and communication technology. These are often referred to as IT Standards, ICT Standards (more common outside the US), or even more specifically, Healthcare IT Standards.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

5 Ways To Bring Data And Design Into The Battle Against Diabetes

5 Ways To Bring Data And Design Into The Battle Against Diabetes | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Diabetes is one of the most alarmingly large health epidemics in the U.S.--a whopping 25.8 million people Americans live with the disease. That’s 8.3% of the population. Sanofi US aims to impact that group (outside of its diabetes drugs) with the Data Design Diabetes challenge, an effort to bring human-center design and open data to the diabetes community. This week, Sanofi announced the five semi-finalists.

 

Last year, the open innovation challenge brought a number of data-driven products for diabetes out of the woodwork, including Ginger.io, an app that analyzes phone usage data to detect when patients are feeling down. Since its win, Ginger.io has raised $1.7 million in seed funding.

 

This time around, the challenge did things a little differently: Instead of just asking people to submit ideas on how to drive innovation in delivery of diabetes care, Sanofi first polled the public to find out what mattered most in terms of quality, delivery, and cost of diabetes care in the U.S. "They said they wanted to create tools that could make people feel in control, recognize that people want to be well and not just have symptoms addressed, and understand that diabetes is a disease that affects families, friends, and close communities," explains Michele Polz, head of patient solutions, U.S. diabetes at Sanofi. After going through over 70 entries, the judges whittled them down to these semifinalists:

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

3 Reasons Why Social Networking Is Not a Waste of Time for Health Professionals : Health in 30

3 Reasons Why Social Networking Is Not a Waste of Time for Health Professionals : Health in 30 | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Social networking allows doctors, nurses and other health professionals to deeply connect and engage with the community and their colleagues.

 

“We are standing at the precipice of a new online revolution in health care. As more and more health experts embrace the Internet and increase their social media activity, health information seekers will undoubtedly benefit in profound ways.” [Source: Mashable]

 

Dynamic health and medical professionals engaged in social networking, using Twitter, Facebook, Blogs and YouTube are on the front-line of new modern medicine.

 

Today’s modern medicine is all about the patient. Participating, partnering and developing a professional relationship is paramount.

 

While many health consumers are searching the web for support, reassurance and specific health news and information; doctors and nurses continue to question the value of the internet for patients.

Social networking sites such as Twitter, Facebook, and Blogs are not a waste of time for health professionals because it offers value.

 

Social networking sites and blogs are a powerful and phenomenal platform to educate patients, raise awareness of health issues and it offers a forum to collaborate and connect. It gives a voice to patients and it allows for the conversation to get started with their doctors and other health care professionals.

Doctors, nurses and other health professionals can help validate what is important for patients.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Sloppy EHR Implementation Could Threaten Patient Safety

Sloppy EHR Implementation Could Threaten Patient Safety | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

A study of health IT implementation at seven Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals shows that when information systems are implemented without proper planning and management, problems can occur and threaten patient safety. These problems are not unique to VA hospitals, and other institutions will undoubtedly encounter them as they roll out their own electronic health records.


Published in the American Journal of Managed Care, the study was based on interviews with nurses, pharmacists, physicians, IT staff members, and managers. The interviews were conducted several years after the introduction of the VA's computerized patient record system (CPRS) and bar code medication administration (BCMA) system.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Personal v Professional Physician Social Media

Personal v Professional Physician Social Media | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Almost 90% of physicians use at least one site for personal use and over 65% for professional purposes.

 

Personal use surpasses professional use when it comes to physicians on social media. Today, more doctors use two or more social media platforms for personal purposes compared with social sites used for professional purposes.

 

As a profession, doctors have a significant interest in the potential applications of social media to patients and other clinicians. They illustrate interest in online physician communities and patient communities that may facilitate doctor-patients interactions.

 

A small group of “connected clinicians”, use multiple social media platforms for both personal and professional use.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Pharma's iPad attraction marks tech adoption shift

Pharma's iPad attraction marks tech adoption shift | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Tech companies have often struggled to crack the code for appealing to drugmakers and healthcare companies, which have been notoriously resistant to many of the latest trends in IT.

 

But there's mounting evidence that drug companies are changing the way they consume new tech, and one prime example of this shift is the industry's well-documented affection for Apple's ($AAPL) iPad. Pharma companies are buying the tablets by the thousands, doling them out to sales reps and executives, some of whom probably already own the popular devices.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Effect of EHR Implementation On Short Term Hospital Cash-Flow and Revenue Can Be Shocking.

If doctors, nurses, pharmacists and all other end users find their jobs more difficult after EHR implementation, the consequences can be disastrous. Errors will increase. Efficiency will plummet. Patient satisfaction will suffer. Ultimately, hospital revenue will decline as doctors have less time to see patients, choose to leave hospital care or send their patients to other hospital systems that are easier to navigate. These sacrifices will all occur on the backdrop of promises to make everything better. The Medicare National Bank is forcing hospital systems and doctors' offices to implement EHR systems now or face stiff penalties in the future.

 

Unfortunately, I do not believe current EHR tools are being built with the end user in mind. I say that because every experience I have with offices that have implemented EHR platforms generate pages of worthless medical records that provide no insight into the patients' medical needs. These systems are being built by engineers to better mine data that will be used to reward and punish doctors and hospital systems with a never ending list of sticks and carrots that are fabricated using false assumptions and bad policy. For example, many policy folks believed that electronic availability of prior lab tests would decrease unnecessary testing. But recent data contradicts that assumption and suggests that EHRs increase the amount of testing performed.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Speaking personally: where to give voice to healthcare interests on the social web

We are all aware of the importance of discoverability on the Internet.

 

We understand that blog posts which cannot be found, regardless of their quality, will not be read. We therefore take pains to optimise our content for search engines by electing to use natural language search terms as post titles, and judiciously tagging posts and images with keywords.

 

However, how much thought are we giving to the context within which the content we publish across the social web is considered?

 

As the number of platforms and services such as Klout, PeerIndex, Kred and Connect.me that rank and rate social metadata proliferate, so it is becoming increasingly important for those of us within the health conversation on the social web to consider the impact that the reception and assessment of the totality of our activities has on our representation.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Social Media: Promise and Pitfalls for Doctors

How can physicians most effectively use social media to advance their careers, establish thought leadership and engage patients . . . all while steering clear of HIPAA violations and personal privacy issues?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

EMR Blueprint: Steps 3 & 4: Current State Workflow and Validation

What is workflow? Originating in the manufacturing arena, it has come to be an integral part of planning and managing implementations. Fundamentally, workflow delineates and defines the discrete steps involved in completing tasks.

 

Details may vary but the basic components of an office visit are the same: patient arrival, examination, billing. Many individual tasks are contained within each of those very broad categories. Very often tasks are completed out of habit and those are things that get overlooked and subsequently cause consternation upon implementation because the EMR is not aware of/programmed to take into account human habits. It can be, but only if those things are recognized and requested.

 

For example, in placing lab orders for a diabetic patient, an endocrinologist may say to a nurse (or medical assistant), please order the usual tests for Mrs. Johnson. The nurse/MA knows that Mrs. Johnson is an established patient, has been seen several times in the practice. The doctor always orders Hemoglobin A1c, a lipid panel and fasting glucose for patients like Mrs. Johnson. This is called the current state workflow; the steps for this can be defined as follows:

 

Review labs for Mrs. Johnson
Fill out lab order form (specifying which tests are to be performed)
Sign order form (provider)
Give lab slip to Mrs. Johnson
In some offices, blood will be drawn and sent to the lab; in others, patient will need to go to a different location
Wait for lab results to be faxed to practice
File results in Mrs. Johnson’s chart

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Will Things Really Get Worse for Doctors Online?

Will Things Really Get Worse for Doctors Online? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The more I read the more warnings I hear about doctors online. It seems that as more doctors interact online, the more problems we can expect to encounter. According to authorities, things are about to get worse for all of us. Imagine the clinical chaos we can expect come 2050.

 

Or maybe not.

 

The problem with this pessimistic view is what Matt Ridley has referred to as extrapolationism: the assumption that the future is just a bigger version of the past. What’s bad now will be worse later.

But as history has taught us, the future is not simply an extension of the past. We have a remarkable capacity to correct ourselves.

 

Going forward:

 

Doctors will learn from experience.
Digital professionalism will be part of every medical student’s curriculum
We’ll be smarter.


So pay no attention to the apocaholics who have hijacked the public discourse on doctors and social media. And don’t expect the sky to fall any time soon.

 

For a realistic view of the future of the human race, read Matt Ridley’s The Rational Optimist.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

The Great Challenges of Health and Medicine

The TEDMED community includes thoughtful individuals and institutions from the fields of medicine, the sciences, technology, government, business, education, the law, religion, the armed forces, media and the arts. This extraordinarily diverse community gathers at the The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC and — via remote simulcast — in big-screen auditoriums across America in medical schools, research institutions, teaching hospitals, universities, foundations, health-focused corporations and state and federal agencies.

 

TEDMED is hosting the Great Challenges Program because our community is dedicated to sharing cutting-edge ideas and unusual perspectives. TEDMED believes that before America can effectively address its most complex and persistent health issues, we need a broader, richer understanding of these Challenges.

 

Accordingly, the mission of the Great Challenges Program is not to “solve” America’s most confounding health and wellness problems. Instead, we seek to provide America and the world with a comprehensive view, incorporating thoughtful perspectives from every discipline and from all sectors of society.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Do’s and Don’ts of hospital health IT

Do start implementing cloud-based services. Don’t think, though, that just because you are implementing cloud services that you will have less infrastructure or related work to do. Cloud services, especially in the SaaS realm, are “application-centric” solutions and as such the infrastructure requirements remain pretty substantial – especially the sophistication of the network infrastructure.


Do consider programmable and app-driven content management and document management systems as a core for their electronic health records instead of special-purpose EHR systems written decades ago. Don’t install new EHRs that don’t have robust document management capabilities. Do consider EHRs that can be easily integrated with document and content management systems like SharePoint or Alfresco.


Do go after virtualization for almost all apps – as soon as possible, make it so that no applications are sitting in physical servers. Don’t invest more in any apps that cannot easily be virtualized.


Do start looking at location-based asset tracking and app functionality; your equipment should be aware of where it’s physically sitting and be able to “find itself” and “track itself” using location-based awareness. Don’t invest heavily in systems that can not support location-based awareness (like potentially allow or disallow logins based on where someone is logging in from as well as enable / disable certain features in applications on where logins are occurring).


Do start implementing single sign on and common identity management with CCOW integration. Don’t invest in any systems that cannot meet common identity or SSO requirements.


Don’t make long-term decisions on mobile app platforms like iOS and Android because the mobile world is still quite young and the war between Apple, Microsoft, and Google is nowhere near being resolved. A platform that looks strong today may be weak tomorrow and become legacy quickly; however, HTML5 is not going anywhere and will be ultimate winner of the next 15 years just like HTML4 is the winner from 1995 to now. Do start investing in HTML 5 and CSS3 and away from HTML4. Don’t install any more apps that require IE6/7 or older browsers and don’t invest in systems that don’t have HTML5 in their roadmaps.
Don’t write applications on top of legacy EHR platforms; write applications with proper HL7 connectivity and platform independence. Most EHR platforms are using technologies that are either ancient or need to be replaced; by integrating deeply but remaining independent of their technologies you’ll get the best of both worlds.


Don’t buy any medical devices from vendors that don’t have a deep and thorough medical device to healthcare IT enterprise connectivity strategy. If a device doesn’t have wired or wireless TCP/IP access, doesn’t have data export or HL7 connectivity is not worth purchasing.


Don’t buy any thick-client applications that do not have thin-client “remote viewers” available.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Cloud and healthcare IT

While many industries are reliant on information technology to deliver services and drive innovation, none is so deeply entwined in IT than healthcare. Whether it’s federal government mandates to move towards fully electronic information processing, or the explosive growth of consumerized tools like tablets and smartphones, the healthcare industry both shapes, and is shaped by, the technology it uses.

 

As such, it should be no surprise that the potential impact of cloud computing is being felt, with mixed feelings, most acutely in this industry.

 

Cloud, as a platform, has been sometimes dismissed as nothing more than a new name for old technology. That’s understandable – cloud doesn’t rely on anything especially new nor are the business models especially novel. After all, companies have been delivering software services over the internet for some years. However, simply examining the constituent parts of cloud misses the fact that cloud represents so much more than a lot of virtual servers accessed through a browser. Cloud is as much the effect as it is the cause; it is both the technology and the way that the technology is being used. Cloud may be made up familiar building blocks, but the end result is something radically new.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

U.S. Physicians Hesitant About Health IT

U.S. Physicians Hesitant About Health IT | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

American doctors have a curious attitude toward health IT: Most agree with physicians around the world that technology provides better access to quality data for clinical research, improves coordination of care and reduces medical errors.

 

But U.S. physicians are at odds with their international colleagues about technology’s value in improving diagnostic and treatment decisions and treatment outcomes – most American doctors doubted technology could help.

 

Why would American physicians be less inclined than others to be pro-technology? It’s not because they avoid digital tools – 30 percent of U.S. physicians use a tablet device, compared to 5 percent usage by American consumers. But like the rest of the population, doctors may find the endless debates about which manufacturer has the best product for the job just as frustrating as those trying to choose between an iPhone and an Android.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Data breaches of small businesses, including doctor offices, on the rise

Data breaches of small businesses, including doctor offices, on the rise | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

A report says cyber criminals are seeking what they consider easy targets.

 

Small organizations, including physician practices, represented the largest number of data breaches in 2011, according to Verizon’s annual Data Breach Investigations Report.

 

The report examined 855 breaches across the globe that accounted for 174 million compromised records in 2011. The analysis found that cyber criminals are responsible for a large number of breaches globally, and small organizations are considered easy targets.

 

One of the reasons breaches at small health care organizations are on the rise is that automated attacks searching for remote Internet access services combined with weak passwords “were successful against smaller health care businesses, such as physicians’ offices and clinics,” said Marc Spitler, senior risk analyst of RISK Intelligence for Verizon.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Healthcare Basics: Continuity of Care, It Takes an Empowered Patient To Make it Happen

Healthcare Basics: Continuity of Care, It Takes an Empowered Patient To Make it Happen | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Patients are increasingly seen by a wide array of providers in a number of different locations, often raising concerns about fragmentation of care. When patients are most ill and need to be hospitalized, they are seen, not by their PCP who knows them well and who they trust, but by hospitalists and specialists who they have often never met. The way the system is now structured, the level of acuity of hospitalized patients has gone up drastically because insurance companies are increasingly refusing to pay for patients with lesser illnesses to be treated in the hospital. The hospitalist, who has day by day experience with in-patient care becomes the lead doctor.

 

According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, it is an obligation of physicians to provide continuity of care to their patients in all settings, both directly and by coordination of care with other health care professionals. Continuity implies a sense of affiliation between patients and their practitioners and the passing off of all necessary information..

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

The Truth Between Patients and e-Patients

The Truth Between Patients and e-Patients | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

e-Patients, otherwise known as internet patients, are health consumers who use the web to find information about certain medical conditions.

 

ese savvy surfers also use electronic communication to source information for family, friends and their own ailments.

 

e-Patients are equipped, enabled, empowered, engaged, equals, emancipated and experts.

 

e-Patients report two outcomes of their health information searches ::

 

better health information and services

 

different [not always better!] relationship with their doctor

 

 

more...
No comment yet.

Would you like me to help you?

Please fill this short form and I will get in touch with you