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The ways in which technology benefits healthcare
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“Devaluate the Algorithm” And “Tax the Data Sellers”–A Cure for Both Healthcare and an Economy Based Heavily on Intangibles–We’ve Lost Our Balance

“Devaluate the Algorithm” And “Tax the Data Sellers”–A Cure for Both Healthcare and an Economy Based Heavily on Intangibles–We’ve Lost Our Balance | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Now I am very pro technology so wanted to clear the air on this post before folks get the wrong idea, as a matter of fact I used to write code, and thus going back to my roots the visualization is there along with the past where I spent over 25 years as an outside sales representative, calling on and working for Fortune 500 companies. I thought I should mention this as it might help make a little more sense of my opinions.

 

I have no special talent but rather am just wired this way with being logical and not sitting in denial as to what is really happening. So what about devaluating algorithms? Its needs to be done and I might also add that we will always have both open source free software and software that you pay for as we need both.

 

You take a very successful company like Microsoft who creates software for a profit and they have done a great job and develop software solutions that they sell from the business enterprise side to the consumer area, and it’s pretty much affordable. They get boring as folks say on the stock market, but they are steady and stay with their plan and also have some open source software too. Apple, same thing with the exception they are into the hardware side with devices, as we all know the Ipad. Both companies do a great job along with many others out there.

 

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HealthCare Business: 10 Tech Trends that are Going Mainstream and What to Do About It

HealthCare Business: 10 Tech Trends that are Going Mainstream and What to Do About It | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

It’s the end of the year, so you know what that means.  All the armchair prognosticators come out of the woodwork to make their futuristic claims.

 

“the 10 things early adopter companies with unlimited budgets will be experimenting with next year.” Much as we’d like to, most of us don’t live in this world. So what’s a tech realist to do? We’ve outlined 10 tech trends that are going mainstream…and what your healthcare business should be doing about it in the coming year.

 

- Written in December 2011. Ineteresting Read in Mid 2012

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Real-time malaria detection via SMS

Real-time malaria detection via SMS | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

From her house in Snay Anchit Village, about five kilometres from the health centre in Kampot province’s Chum Kiri district, 20-year-old village malaria worker Kong Lida can clearly hear the noise of a generator roaring in the distance. This generator is an important source of power where Lida and other villagers have their car batteries charged every day so that their houses can be lit up at night from electric lamps and at the same time charge up their mobile phones.

 

But soon Lida and other village malaria workers in her village and other communes will not need to pay the generator owner to have their car batteries charged any more. Now, all these VMWs will get their power from a ubiquitous source of energy – namely solar power.

 

As part of the country’s malaria elimination strategy, the National Centre for Parasitology, Entomology and Malaria Control (CNM), with technical support from the World Health Organisation and Malaria Consortium, has launched a pilot program to train VMWs in Kampot, Siem Reap and Kampong Cham provinces on how to send simple mobile phone text messages (SMS) to report in real time on detected malaria cases. These SMS messages also support the paper reporting that feeds into the health information system from the health centres.

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ONC launches challenge for reporting patient safety events app

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT has kicked off a developer challenge to innovate tools to make it easier to report patient safety events to improve care.

 

Hospitals struggle to increase internal incident reporting, especially by busy physicians and nurses, and to create effective systems for the quality and risk management staff to do root cause analyses and follow-up.

 

Patient safety organizations (PSOs) listed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) create a safe environment for healthcare providers to collect, aggregate and analyze data without fear of legal discovery.

 

With this challenge, ONC asks multi-disciplinary teams to develop an application that enables reporting of patient safety events, whether in hospital or ambulatory care settings, according to an announcement in the April 11 Federal Register.

Developers need to submit their applications by end of the day July 23. The first prize award is $50,000, followed by $15,000 and $5,000 awards.

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Can Your Insulin Pump Be Hacked?

Technology security experts have sent out a warning about the potential vulnerability of sensitive equipment — not computers but medical devices such as insulin pumps.


A researcher from McAfee, the global tech security company, was able to hack into an insulin pump and cause the device to dispense all 300 units of insulin it contained, according to BBC News.

 

The wireless signals used to communicate with the pump could compromise the security of the device, researcher Barnaby Jack said.

 

“We can influence any pump within a 300 foot range,” Jack told the BBC. “We can make that pump dispense its entire 300 unit reservoir of insulin and we can do that without requiring its ID number.”

 

A single dose of that much insulin can be fatal.

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Health Systems Ignore Patients at Their Own Peril

Health Systems Ignore Patients at Their Own Peril | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

“The most important member of the care team is the patient.” That has been a statement one has heard in healthcare for decades, yet it has never been more important. Why? It is next to impossible to succeed in the value and outcome-based healthcare reimbursement model every private and government payor is driving towards (with or without Obamacare).

 

In my experience reviewing or implementing over 100 health IT systems, the core purpose of legacy healthIT systems is crystal clear — their job is to get as big a bill out as quickly as possible. Why wouldn’t it? The much-criticized fee-for-service model that incentivizes activity over outcome has driven that outcome. In fact, it would have been irrational for healthcare providers to demand systems that did otherwise. The fuzzy image below is how a patient looks to healthIT systems where it has one point of clarity — the billing codes associated with the patients. That may be good for billing but unfortunately that is at the heart of healthcare’s hyperinflation. Consider that since the 60′s, while all non-healthcare expenditures increased 8x, healthcare increased 274x.

 

While there is great ambiguity about the future of healthcare, there is one certainty: healthcare will be paid based on some blend of value/quality/outcome and a shifting away from the “do more, bill more” reimbursement model. One can’t overstate the scale of this change and what it means for healthcare providers and the organizations that support them. This will make the shift from analog to digital media look trivial.One similarity to the analog-to-digital media shift, however, is healthcare will also face deflationary economics that will produce many winners and losers.

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Meaningful Use Provides Hospital EHR Vendor Lock In

One of the unintended consequences of meaningful use is that it provides a real hospital EHR vendor lock in. Certainly hospital EHR vendors have a pretty significant lock in even without meaningful use. Saying that switching hospital EHR software is a large project is a supreme understatement. However, if that wasn’t lock in enough, meaningful use makes it so that I can’t imagine a single hospital switching EHR software during the 5 year meaningful use cycle.

 

In a Meaningful Use Monday post on EMR and HIPAA, Lynn Scheps covered the details of Switching EHR software in the middle of meaningful use. So, yes it is technically possible and CMS has covered those that do end up switching EHR software. As the meaningful use stages progress I could even see this happening relatively frequently in the ambulatory EHR arena. I don’t see this happening at all in the hospital EHR arena.

 

You might ask why? I can’t imagine a hospital going to the effort of reconciling the details of meaningful use between two systems. Not to mention the implementation time for a hospital EHR system is so long that you’d likely lose out on a year of meaningful use money anyway. I don’t see any hospital CIO making this choice.

 

I made the argument in a previous post that much like ERP software, there will be an opportunity for some EHR software to displace the current vendor. I suggested this is most likely during the renewal or upgrade period. I still think this is sound reasoning and would be the time a hospital CIO could make the case for change. Although, I’m sure that meaningful use and the EHR incentive money will likely mean that many hospital CIOs take the upgrade cost on the chin instead of switching software.

 

Makes me wonder if EHR vendors will use this to their advantage when it’s time to deal with renewals and upgrades. I’d hope this wouldn’t be the case, but I won’t be surprised if it happens.

 

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Why social media tools are a must-have for physicians

Why social media tools are a must-have for physicians | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

With one-third or more of consumers using social media to obtain and share health information, physicians who don't use the technology risk getting left behind, according to several recent posts. 

 

Without a digital presence, physicians risk:

 

losing patients who prefer online communication

 

missing opportunities to brand themselves as experts

 

not reaching potential new patients through social media channels

 

missing the chance to dispel health myths and clarify correct and appropriate health information

 

failing to hear what patients have to say about their health, healthcare in general and other topics that can influence how a physician practices medicine

 

passing up the opportunity to respond to negative reviews of their practices

 

 

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Branded pharmaceutical websites generate highest lifts in Rx conversion and adherence

Branded pharmaceutical websites generate highest lifts in Rx conversion and adherence | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

"Over the years, our benchmarking studies have proven the impact that online marketing continues to have on increasing consumer awareness and favourability toward health brands, ultimately driving treatment," said John Mangano, vice president for comScore Health and Pharmaceutical Solutions. "As we continue to provide the industry standard for measuring online pharmaceutical brand lifts, we're also excited to introduce significant innovations to our methodology that will allow marketers to quantify not only the incremental conversions driven by their online campaigns, but also the incremental impact of each ad exposure in driving overall brand lift."

 

Branded site visitation yields most significant lifts in new patients and Rx adherence
Supporting previous benchmarking studies, the most recent findings indicate that exposure to online display ads yields a nominal lift in brand awareness among prospects, with a higher lift seen for exposure and interaction with rich media ads. However, branded website visitation continues to have the greatest impact for both prospects and patients, yielding significant lifts not just in awareness, but also in favourability and conversion. Existing patients of a pharmaceutical brand who visited the brand site increased their refill rate by 14.7 percentage points compared to the control group. Prospects who visited a branded site also saw a positive increase of 8.9 percentage points in beginning treatment compared to those with no exposure to the site.

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Online Communities Accelerate Adoption of Best Practices for Quality and Cost Savings

Online Communities Accelerate Adoption of Best Practices for Quality and Cost Savings | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

What is an online community?

 

Whether public or private, an online community is simply a place for people to connect and share ideas. It differs from a landing page or a website in that participants engage in various tangents according to their interests. An online community can be based around professional roles, emerging technologies, or initiatives like healthcare quality. Online community members typically connect with experts and share research and their own experiences to arrive at a collective understanding of best practices.

 

Critical Success Factors for Online Communities

 

Getting from here to there can be tough for

healthcare providers with little experience in web-based collaboration. Successful online communities employ three critical success factors:

 

Member engagement. Rather than posting information on a static website, a successful online community is supported by community managers who can post resources, synthesize comments, and keep the conversation going with relevant questions.

 

A framework of tools. The technological underpinnings of a successful online community provide various ways for members to connect and collaborate, from taking polls to posting content and hosting group discussions.

 

Revealing data. Reports can provide healthcare professionals with constant feedback so they can tailor initiatives swiftly.

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Design of a Phone-Based Clinical Decision Support System for Resource-Limited Settings

Design of a Phone-Based Clinical Decision Support System for Resource-Limited Settings | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

This paper uses a multi-method approach to document four failure modes that
can impact CDSS implementations. Building from six design principles, it describes a phone-based system designed to address these failure modes and comes to six core endings that are important for mobile systems implementers and health care providers.

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5 steps to unblocking social media at your hospital

5 steps to unblocking social media at your hospital | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

According to QuantiaMD, 67 percent of physicians use social media professionally, and the ability to always be connected is essential to making online social networking manageable. Health care professionals may eventually fall behind in their social networking efforts if hospitals continue to have those capabilities blocked.

 

Below are the first steps to beginning the process of unblocking social media at your hospital.

 

1. Create a committee

Invite those with varying backgrounds
Develop a plan of action

 

2. Examine the reasons why social media is blocked

Ask why
Identify fears and misconceptions

 

3. Reach out to peers and competitors

Listen and learn what is working
Ask them directly of their experience with unblocking

 

4. Create a Social Media Policy

Be concise and clear
Publicize the policy

 

5. Prove the benefits of social media
Discuss the latest studies and trends; visit stopblocking.org
Provide measurable numbers; speak the decision maker(s)' language
Identify social media as a natural evolution of communication

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mHealth Developers: Take a Minute to Remember Your Audience

mHealth Developers: Take a Minute to Remember Your Audience | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

According to market research from RNCOS, physician adoption of mobile devices in healthcare is expected to reach 81-85 by the end of 2012 as a result of device improvements, increased data speeds and decreased costs.

 

To meet this explosion in device usage and adoption in the healthcare industry, developers and independent software vendors (ISVs) must understand the key similarities and differentiators between an app for the consumer audience and one for the clinical audience. As you begin the design process, keep in mind that just because an app is useful for the consumer user doesn’t mean it’s going to resonate within the confines of the medical community.

 

For example, while you and I may use Siri as our daily digital assistant, the reality is this same technology doesn’t resonate with the everyday practitioner because of distinct differences in ontology and basic support needs as it relates to their specific job duties. For these reasons, I have outlined some important things ISVs and developers should be honing in on as they develop their medical applications

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Do m-Health Tools Really Work? Testing The Impact of Mobile Technology on Maternal and Child Health Care

Do m-Health Tools Really Work? Testing The Impact of Mobile Technology on Maternal and Child Health Care | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

With the proliferation of innovative mHealth tools across the developing world, there comes an inspiring enthusiasm for health system reform. But mHealth raises a critical question as well: how do we know mHealth tools are actually changing health outcomes for the better?

 

We have set out to see if this tool is just a very cool device, or if it actually improves maternal health and decreases maternal and infant mortality.

 

You may be used to reading about the development and testing of mHealth tools aimed at scaling up to farther-reaching implementation. Our work, however, is a bit different: we built a tool on which we will do no further development, and instead rigorously test the impact of this tool on health outcomes of rural mothers and children through a randomized evaluation.

 

Basically, we are searching for hard evidence first, and leave a discussion of scale-up for once we have the data.

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Diabetes Nest

Diabetes Nest | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Diabetes Nest is a Twitter-based diabetes network designed to help people discover the best conversations from the most meaningful voices.

 

It is designed to help people discover the best conversations from the most meaningful voices. The Nest was created by Ignite Health and sponsored by Roche Diabetes Care, makers of ACCU-CHEK® products and services. We hope you enjoy the experience and join the migration.

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“Mobile app challenges” in the US aim to enhance innovation in healthcare

“Mobile app challenges” in the US aim to enhance innovation in healthcare | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Over the past few years, electronic health record (EHR) adoption has increased, there has been significant government investment in health IT, and mobile device and applications use has become pervasive. These factors have spurred the creation of mobile application development “challenges” – competitions which aim to increase innovation in the mobile health (m-health) space. The most prominent organizations sponsoring these competitions have been the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). While these competitions offer financial perks, Ovum suggests that interested developers not only recognize monetary benefits but also consider the benefits around enhanced business networking and the opportunities for partnership development, learning, and mentorship.

 

Organizations are increasingly sponsoring healthcare “app challenges”

 

Recently, much attention has been directed toward the digitization of healthcare records. In order to advance this process and increase adoption among providers, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have provided monetary incentives to those who adhere to “meaningful use” guidelines (a set of requirements on how EHRs should be used). This attention, coupled with the pervasiveness of mobile applications, has created much excitement around, and interest in, health IT, and has influenced government and non-profit organizations to create and sponsor healthcare “app challenges” (some of which are EHR-specific), such as those listed below.

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5 Awesome Medical Apps That Make Medicine More Productive

5 Awesome Medical Apps That Make Medicine More Productive | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Here’s a look at some of the apps that are being used in doctor’s offices and hospitals around the U.S to increase productivity and give ease to patients.

 

1. Interactive Anatomy:

 

This app helps you learn all the names of the body parts and lets you demonstrate that knowledge to a patient than by sharing an intricate 3D model on a tablet? Skeletal System app is one of the most loved app in this category.

 

and 4 more...

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Data analytics driving medical breakthroughs

Data analytics driving medical breakthroughs | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Big data and other technologies are poised to start saving lives and enhancing quality of life for sick patients.

 

A hospital is usually a pretty busy place, but the neonatal intensive care unit at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children has been buzzing with even more activity than is customary. Thanks to a new technology partnership, the hospital is working to use analytics to predict more accurately than ever before which premature babies are at most risk for disease and infection.

 

The hospital is in a study to monitor temperature, heart rate, blood saturation and blood pressure levels on preemies, collecting streaming data from electronic devices that monitor the premature babies.

 

Sick Kids, as the hospital is known, is in good company. Healthcare providers -- from insurance firms to hospitals to service suppliers -- are lining up to adopt advanced technologies to help them take better care of their patients, in many cases becoming more proactive and more personalized than ever before, with the hopes of saving money, too.

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Online oral health education tools: Part 1, Opportunity

Problem: Even people who have regular health-care visits often do not get preventive care and suffer poor oral health literacy.

 

Given the nature of common oral illness, dentists should be looking forward to the use of online personal health tools to improve patient oral health and enhance practice management and patient care efficiency. For years, policymakers have urged American health care to adopt Electronic Medical Records systems (EMR) and Personal Health Records (PMR) that remind doctors and patients about needed care and make it easier for doctors to share information with one another. Dentistry has lagged significantly behind. Increasingly, American health care is shifting to information- and network-based patient care. The slow but steady adaptation of the use of EMR, PMR, among other tools, is intended to address one of the biggest flaws in modern health care.

 

Solution: Use practice-based online tools to track patient self-assessments and dental visit examination outcomes to provide the most effective and efficient method for monitoring patient health and enhance practice management and patient care efficiency.

 

The very nature of common oral illness and the proven beneficial effect of timely preventive dental visits dictate that online health records could have tremendous benefit for promoting health literacy/behaviors and timely dental visits from birth through the senior years.

 

This is just the beginning. As we know, poor oral health is a cofactor for chronic health problems, such as diabetes, heart disease, stroke, pneumonia, low birth weight, and brittle bones. Additionally, medications prescribed for chronic health problems can be harmful for oral health, but online tools can alert primary physicians of the situation. Patient self-assessment and outcome data could help dentists and physicians bridge the communication gap that exists between the professions.

 

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Increase Patient Participation with Health IT

Increase Patient Participation with Health IT | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Providers and patients who share access to electronic health information can collaborate in informed decision making. Patient participation is especially important in managing and treating chronic conditions such as asthma, diabetes, and obesity.

 

How EHRs Foster Patient Participation

 

Electronic health records (EHRs) can help providers:

Ensure high-quality care. With EHRs, providers can give patients full and accurate information about all of their medical evaluations. Providers can also offer follow-up information after an office visit or a hospital stay, such as self-care instructions, reminders for other follow-up care, and links to web resources.


Create an avenue for communication with their patients. With EHRs, providers can manage appointment schedules electronically and exchange e-mail with their patients. Quick and easy communication between patients and providers may help providers identify symptoms earlier. And it can position providers to be more proactive by reaching out to patients.

 

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Using the iPad as a telemedicine aid

Apple iPads are becoming ubiquitous (selling over 55 million of anything will tend to do that). They’re “evolutionizing” education, air travel, and even medicine, but most of these advances have stemmed from replacing lots of paper (e.g., textbooks, maps, patient charts) with a durable hard drive and a big screen. We’ve been testing a slightly more clever use for iPads on an ambitious client project: using the iPad as a novel telemedicine aid.

 

Telemedicine is a catchall term for administering healthcare remotely, i.e., when the patient and the provider are in different physical locations. In our client’s case, this scenario is caused by timing. Research participants with a rare genetic lesion and their families are flown to one of two sites in North America for an extensive imaging evaluation, but they have to return home before it’s possible to have a local neurologist review any clinically-relevant findings with them. A phone call wasn’t going to cut it, since the neurologist would typically review pictures with the family (an MRI scan, for example) … and most people can’t conjure up an anatomical model of the human brain from memory.

 

Using a computer seemed logical, but not every family has a computer with an Internet connection and video camera, and troubleshooting videoconferencing software can be a nightmare. Laptops suffer from the same limitations, and are fragile and difficult to ship, to boot. Enter the iPad 2 3G. When paired with an inexpensive data plan, the iPad has a decent wireless Internet connection just about anywhere in the US. It has a built-in video camera. And it’s durable, easy to use, and inexpensive to ship (in a padded envelope)!

 

You’re probably (should be) thinking, “What about HIPAA?” HIPAA prevents the disclosure of any medical data for research (or other) purposes. Our research participants’ imaging results are considered Protected Health Information (PHI) and are protected by law from disclosure. Sending them on an electronic device across the country isn’t a safe (or smart) option. So, we used Fuze Meeting, an iPad app that enables secure videoconferencing and image sharing. The neurologist uses Fuze on their local computer to walk the family through any number of images or videos using annotations and other built-in visual aids to ensure the family is looking at the right place. The Fuze Meeting iPad app displays the images and annotations to the family in realtime, and even allows the family to zoom or reposition the images. And since the images are never downloaded to the iPad itself, there’s no risk of PHI falling into the wrong hands, even if the iPad does. Once the consultation is complete, the participant simply mails the device back to the research site.

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A New World of Healthcare Apps

A New World of Healthcare Apps | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Since 2006, we've been tracking the re-birth of health online. Of course it never really went away, but the ehealth frenzy of the late 1990s really only left WebMD standing. Few were online to actually manage their health. Most were just reading about it. That's all changed. We're now in a world where the cloud, ubiquitous smart devices and sensors are all coming together to become what we call "unplatorms" for "apps" and the data that is flowing over them. That health data is starting to be captured and shared between them in a "data utility layer."

 

What this all means is that there's huge number of devices and applications available to be used by all types of players in the healthcare sector. And that use is starting to grow. We picked three areas that are on the cusp of becoming an everyday big deal in health.

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The Knowledge Translation Toolkit

The Knowledge Translation Toolkit | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The tools in this book will help researchers ensure that their good science reaches more people, is more clearly understood, and is more likely to lead to positive action. In sum, that their work becomes more useful, and therefore more valuable.

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Investigation into the Use of Short Message Services to Expand Uptake of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Testing, and Whether Content and Dosage Impact

Investigation into the Use of Short Message Services to Expand Uptake of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Testing, and Whether Content and Dosage Impact | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

South Africa has one of the highest human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence rates in the world, but despite the well-established benefits of HIV counseling and testing (HCT), there is low uptake of HCT. The study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of using short message services (SMSs) to encourage HCT while interrogating the impact of altering SMS content and dosage (the number of SMSs).

 

 

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Pain Management and Telemedicine | HealthWorks Collective

Pain Management and Telemedicine | HealthWorks Collective | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

I do think there are pain management practices that could provide quality healthcare to chronic pain patients in rural areas. And the telemedicine pain doctors might do a lot to help these patients be better able to function. But…..

 

I know when I have a pain (and thankfully I don’t have any that is chronic), I want it to stop hurting. Narcotic painkillers can help overcome pain, but they are only supposed to be a temporary solution. We all know why – they are addictive. Constant use causes other physical problems like constipation.

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