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The ways in which technology benefits healthcare
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Why technology is great for your health

Why technology is great for your health | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
Among all the reports of hackers stealing sensitive information from government agencies -- and individuals -- it's easy to forget that technology is often used for good.
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8 common questions about HL7

What is HL7?

 

Interoperability, or the back-and-forth exchange of patient health data among different organizations, is seen as the "ultimate IT goal of the modern healthcare system," when discussing meaningful use, HITECH and the Affordable Care Act, said Brull. "One of the major challenges to healthcare interoperability is defining common standards for structured content of healthcare data and the transport of that data between different systems, created by different vendors," he said. Creating consensus behind a common healthcare standard is the mission of HL7, which was founded in 1987. "The HL7 Standard was created and has since become widely adopted by vendors worldwide to define content," said Brull.

 

This and 7 other questions at http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/8-common-questions-about-hl7

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Why social media is just what the doctor ordered

Why social media is just what the doctor ordered | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
These days, particularly in the wake of Facebook’s $5 billion S-1 filing, few will argue the explosive impact that social media is having on the way we live.

 

We see it in the way relationships build, the way messages spread, and the tremendous amount of data that’s been assembled about who we are and what we do.

 

The potential is huge; but until very recently, physicians have been largely unable to take full advantage of what these connections have to offer. Specifically, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 prevents doctors from using email or text messaging, much less open platforms like Facebook or Twitter, to communicate about patient care without risk of being fined or fired.

 

Still, the potential for physician-focused, web-based networks is huge, and HIPAA-compliant tools and sites have indeed started to take shape and populate.

 

Healthcare itself has been (often rightly) criticized as slow to change. In fact, Dr. Leslie Saxon recently published an insightful article on why the Internet hasn’t yet had any real impact on how medicine is practiced.

 

But research has shown that as far as technology goes, doctors themselves have proven to be early adopters. Having seen the kinds of conversations that have already begun to take place, I strongly believe that the future of digital medicine will be anchored in these kinds of connections.

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Medigram app allows HIPAA compliant group text messaging between doctors

Medigram app allows HIPAA compliant group text messaging between doctors | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

A new initiative currently being trialed aims to enhance and improve communication between healthcare professionals. Medigram is an app of sorts whose aim is to provide HIPAA compliant secure text messaging between healthcare professionals.

Currently, the primary method of contacting a physician is via a pager which is generally only one way communication.

 

Furthermore, there are often issues such as trying to find a phone which means that the current system is relatively inefficient.

 

Having recognized this, the team at Medigram have designed a mobile app which they hope will revolutionize communication.

 

The free app brings HIPAA compliant group text messaging between doctors who are signed up to the service. Medigram is currently in closed beta with physicians at Stanford Hospital, Lucille Packard Children’s Hospital and the Palo Alto VA Hospital.

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9 Tablets Fit For Doctors

9 Tablets Fit For Doctors | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Since healthcare pros have embraced tablets in a big way, tablet makers have come up with a few design and feature twists for this demanding audience.

 

http://www.informationweek.com/news/galleries/healthcare/mobile-wireless/232500058

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Healthcare companies still don't "Get" Social Media

Healthcare companies still don't "Get" Social Media | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

"Social media is changing the nature of healthcare interaction, and health organizations that ignore this virtual environment may be missing opportunities to engage consumers."

 

That was the very ominous and foerboding opening line from a press release announcing the findings of a report done by the Health Research Institute (HRI) at PwC US.

 

Anytime I see the words "engage" and "missing" I am automatically intrigued because as we all know it's all about engagement: how to get engaged with your customers, how to stay engaged with your customers and how to ensure they stay engaged with you.

 

The report compared the social media activity of hospitals, pharma companies and health insurers to that of community sites and as you can see there is no comparison as community sites had 24 times more social media activity than corporate sites.

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How to Prepare For and Execute An Online Presence

How to Prepare For and Execute An Online Presence | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The world of healthcare is inherently siloed, tethered, fragmented and prone to poor communication and collaboration. Today, healthcare workers solve their problems via traditional methods that are often costly, inefficient, nor timely. Increasingly, more savvy healthcare workers are looking outside the system to digital media and communities for answers, but are challenged with uncertainty over concepts of usefulness, practicality, bandwidth issues, “ROI” and privacy concerns.

 

Establishing a digital presence is rapidly becoming a necessity for healthcare professionals, medical practices, and institutions. Many have recognized this fact… yet many more have not.

 

At its heart, digital media is about people, it is about relationships, and it is about communication. A social media presence is about educating, engaging and growing your audience, improving outcomes, compliance and potentially the bottom line of your practice.

 

 

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Social media: how doctors can contribute

On April 18, The General Medical Council, which regulates medical practice in the UK, opened up its draft guidance on doctors' use of social media for consultation. Comments can be made until June 13, and the results will be published by the end of the year.

 

The guidance emphasises the need to maintain patient confidentiality, provide accurate information, treat colleagues with respect, avoid anonymity online if writing in a professional capacity, be aware of how content is shared, review privacy settings and online presence, declare conflicts of interest, and maintain separate personal and professional profiles.

 

This conservative approach is not dissimilar to existing guidance from medical associations. Accepting Facebook friend requests from patients is, in general, not advised. But what of situations where doctors and patients are genuine friends? What, too, of the benefits of doctors providing medical information via blogs, Twitter, or Facebook?

 

Current guidance focuses more on the risks than the benefits of doctors' use of social media.

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Wishful thinking in medical education: Doctors’ use of social media - some thoughts prior to publication of GMC guidance

Wishful thinking in medical education: Doctors’ use of social media - some thoughts prior to publication of GMC guidance | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

More than half the UK population now use Facebook. And more new users are over 50 rather than under 50. The dominance of Facebook means that if you are not there you are likely to miss out on what is happening with your family or friends. For most of us our use of Facebook has nothing to do with being a doctor.

 

It is about being a mother, nephew, or friend. And it is because we want to protect these people that we care about, and ourselves, that we check our privacy settings and make sure that we are not publishing photos of our nearest and dearest to the world.


So if most of our social media use is about who we are when we are not at work do we need guidance from the GMC? What does using social media have to do with being a doctor at all?

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iMedicine: The Influence of Social Media on Medicine

iMedicine: The Influence of Social Media on Medicine was the topic of the day-long 27th Annual Physician Student Awareness Day (SPAD) held on April 24, 2012 on the campus of New York Medical College in Valhalla, New York. The entire conference was run by medical students from the Class of 2015.

 

Karl Adler, MD, CEO, welcomed the 200 attendees by recalling his own medical school education in the 1960s. Dr. Adler relied on textbooks, mimeographed handouts, and lecture notes to master both the art and science of medicine. In his day, students were taught to rely on the history, the physical examination, laboratory tests, radiology studies, and the EKG; his teachers stressed that the history and physical obtained in a face-to-face encounter between the physician and the patient were the keys to successfully caring for the patient.

 

Ralph A. O’Connell, MD, Provost and Dean, discussed how the party line telephone was the social media of his youth, and he noted that the Council of Deans of the AAMC is holding sessions on social media. He recommended the social media tool-kit from the CDC as a valuable resource for physicians and medical students

 

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Small Practices and National EHR Adoption

Small practices trail larger counterparts in their overall adoption and use of EHR systems. But they are critical ultimately to the success of CMS EHR Incentive Programs and initiatives funded through the ONC.

 

Although hospitals are the largest beneficiaries of CMS EHR incentives to date, they pale in comparison with small practices in terms of the volume of patients seen. In 2006, as part of their analysis of national health trends in the US, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) showed that small practices (less than five physicians) constitute nearly 75% of all health care providers. As Director of the Regional Extension Center of New Hampshire (RECNH) Jeff Loughlin adroitly puts it, “The money is at hospitals; the patient volume, at small practices.”

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Computer system helps physicians identify risk factors

Computer system helps physicians identify risk factors | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

An automated system helps pediatricians screen children for risk factors and focus on the specific needs of the patient, researchers from the Regenstrief Institute report.

 

A study conducted in a large, urban, public health care system showed that a computerized clinical decision support system yielded positive screening rates for identifiable risk factors.

 

The Child Health Improvement through Computer Automation (CHICA) system uses information acquired from the patient, parent, or other family member while in the waiting room, coupled with preexisting data from an electronic medical record (EMR) system to generate patient-specific recommendations and reminders for the physician.

Using paper and pencil, family members answer 20 yes or no questions tailored to the patient’s age and medical history.

 

A nurse scans the responses into the EMR before the pediatrician sees the child, and the system generates a physician worksheet containing alerts and reminders regarding routine care, follow-up, and patient risk factors.

 

In a cohort of nearly 17,000 patients, 408,000 questions were asked in 32,000 visits; 89% of the questions yielded a response. Of those, almost 40,000 (11%) identified positive risk screens in younger children and adolescents that needed to be addressed in well-child visits.

 

The researchers conclude that by automating the process of screening patients in the waiting room with a tailored questionnaire and alerting the physician to those who screen positive for identifiable risks, providers can significantly decrease the burden of identifying and prioritizing relevant guidelines and screenings in their practice.

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mHeath Apps Prescribing Will Change Health Care

There are over 15,000 medical apps available, many with patient management programs and tools. The mHealth industry is envisioning these apps to become integral parts of healthcare practice, being touted to improve efficiency, decrease medical errors, and improve patient outcomes. If the apps are going to have the opportunity to do all this, certain initiatives need to be undertaken.

 

Educating both the public and health care providers about the existence, importance, and role of these types of apps and their ‘prescribability’ is necessary for widespread adoption to take place. Awareness campaigns by payers, the industry, telecommunications companies, governmental agencies, and professional health care organizations (medical specialty societies, patient advocacy groups, and non-profits) will undoubtedly contribute to the effort.

 

Getting the apps to patients and even more importantly, getting the most appropriate apps to patients will be an important goal. Connectivity will initially be an obstacle with some wireless environments. However, open architectures and institutional app ‘stores’ will be common solutions to this problem. Informatics-guided clinical decision tools will recommend personalized app programs (one or a combination of apps) for a given patient. A hospital knowledge officer or the patient’s physician might then oversee and either approve or amend the program before it is prescribed. Technology will allow the provider to electronically prescribe the app as a prescription, much like a medication. The app might be emailed, or delivered in another electronic form. One could also see that an e-prescription of an app would automatically go to the app owner to deliver any necessary hardware to the patient’s home.

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iPad EHR interoperability progressing as virtualization improves

Few health IT leaders outside Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center CIO John Halamka, M.D., or his peers saw the iPad as a health care game-changer upon its release two years ago. Now however, CIOs increasingly view iPad EHR implementations as a way to promote meaningful use compliance among physicians, who love the device. Meanwhile, virtualization vendors are making those implementations more workable.

 

The increase in iPad EHR use also pushes some facilities closer to joining the "bring your own device" -- or BYOD -- movement, which brings its own security and compliance challenges. On the plus side, adopting a BYOD policy shifts the cost of purchasing the tablet to the employee, as well as the hassles of administering hardware upgrades.

 

If you're an IT pro working for a health care provider and not already involved in an iPad EHR implementation, chances are you will be, soon: The iPad represents a significant slice of a mobile connectivity pie that will reshape health care, according to Deloitte's 2011-12 Open Mobile survey, which calls health care the sector most likely to benefit from 4G technology in the coming years.

 

"Mobile is going to be a big part of health care," said Harry Greenspun, M.D., senior advisor at Deloitte Center for Health Solutions, who noted that health care lags a bit behind other market sectors. "People always ask me, 'What does the future of health care look like?' About like the present of every other industry. When you look at how mobile has transformed retail and finance and travel and every other aspect of our lives -- health care is going through the same transformation."

 

The biggest interoperability problem health care software vendors must solve, Greenspun said, is making data ubiquitous despite the wild variation in screen sizes and operating systems. That, while taking into account workflow issues. "Tablets are great for consuming information, but for a lot of folks [tablets are] challenging to generate a lot of information," he said.

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Health IT Makes Health Care Convenient

Health IT can free you to focus on your health instead of the everyday hassles of managing your health care.

 

Health information technology (health IT) can make your interactions with the health care system more convenient, more reliable, and less time consuming.

 

Some examples include:

 

Faster, more accurate prescriptions
E-prescribing systems automatically send orders to the pharmacy for you so your medicine can be ready for pickup when you arrive, saving waiting time. E-prescribing can also reduce the potential medication errors such as those made by messy handwriting on a paper prescription.

 

Rapid information sharing
When a provider adds patient notes or test results to your EHR, that information may be available to all health care providers authorized to view your records, so they can have access to the most up to date information about your health. Some health care providers may allow you to access your own health information directly, meaning you no longer have to wait to hear back from your doctor for information such as test results that are normal and may not require an explanation.

 

Reduced paperwork
As a patient, you have probably answered the same questions about personal information and medical history dozens of times on seemingly identical forms. When health care providers share your electronic health information, you may not need to write down the same facts repeatedly.

 

Reduced unnecessary tests
Doctors sometimes order tests that you’ve had before simply because they do not have easy access to prior results. If all your test results are recorded in EHRs that can talk to each other, a health care provider can see prior test results that are available and order only truly necessary tests and procedures, saving time, money, and discomfort while reducing risk.

 

Better follow-up, better follow-through
Many EHRs incorporate reminder systems for both you and your doctor. For example, some EHRs remind your doctor to follow up with you about ongoing health conditions or to offer you information or services in response to changes in your health. At the same time, some EHRs can send you email or text message reminders about making or keeping appointments, staying current with treatment and medications, and other ways to improve health.

 

Secure access to information
In the event of a natural disaster or other tragedy, having your records in an EHR should make it easier to reassemble your records, and to make them available to providers away from home in the event that you need to relocate temporarily or permanently. The Federal Government requires certified systems to meet security standards so that professionals and others you designate can see only the information they need in order to manage your care effectively; your State Government may require additional protections. Learn more about the security of your health information.

 

 

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Terminologies profiling IT usage within Healthcare

Health Telematics
Health Telematics is a composite term for health-related activities, services and systems, carried out over a distance by means of information and communications technologies, for the purposes of global health promotion, disease control, and health care, as well as education, management, and research for health.

 

eHealth
E-health is the combined use in the health sector of electronic communication and information technology (digital data transmitted, stored and retrieved electronically) for clinical, education and administrative purposes, both at the local site and at a distance.

 

mHealth
mHealth (also written as m-health or mobile health) is a term used for the practice of medicine and public health, supported by mobile devices. The term is most commonly used in reference to using mobile communication devices, such as mobile phones, tablet computers and PDAs, for health services and information. The mHealth field has emerged as a sub-segment of eHealth

 

Telemedicine
The delivery of health care services, where distance is a critical factor, by health care professionals using information and communications technologies for the exchange of valid information for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease and injuries, research and evaluation, and for the continuing education of health care providers, all in the interest of advancing the health of individuals and their communities.

 

Electronic Medical Record (EMR)
An electronic record of health-related information on an individual that can be created, gathered, managed, and consulted by authorized clinicians and staff within one health care organization.

 

Electronic Health Record (EHR)
An electronic record of health-related information on an individual that conforms to nationally recognized interoperability standards and that can be created, managed, and consulted by authorized clinicians and staff across more than one health care organization.

 

Personal Health Record (PHR)
An electronic record of health-related information on an individual that conforms to nationally recognized interoperability standards and that can be drawn from multiple sources while being managed, shared, and controlled by the individual.

 

Health Information Exchange (HIE)
Health information exchange (HIE) is the electronic movement of health-related information among organizations according to nationally recognized standards. It refers to the process of reliable and interoperable electronic health-related information sharing conducted in a manner that protects the confidentiality, privacy, and security of the information.

 

Integrated EHR
This refers to an EHR that is integrated with practice management software. Typical choices include purchasing a fully integrated product which performs all the functions of practice management software, or a stand-alone EHR which is compatible with an existing practice management system.

 

 

Disclaimer: The definitions have been used as is from multiple sources.

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How Mobile, Cloud, Are Transforming Healthcare

How Mobile, Cloud, Are Transforming Healthcare | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
Spurred by a combination of government incentives and aging technology, healthcare is entering an IT renaissance with mobile and cloud technologies at the center.

 

Spurred by a combination of government incentives and aging technology, healthcare is entering an IT renaissance. Mobile and cloud technologies are at the heart of healthcare's transformation. Tablets are replacing paper medical charts, private clouds are enabling secure access to medical records, and mobile cloud collaboration tools are improving information sharing among medical professionals and academics.

 

Mobile and cloud healthcare services are also being used to solve a wide range of challenges, such as fraud, remote diagnostics, and patient CRM.

 

In addition to storing medical records, cloud services are also stepping in to fight healthcare fraud. It's estimated that fraud accounts for as much as $260 billion, or at least 10 percent of annual U.S. healthcare expenses. Predictive modeling, commonly used in the financial services and telecommunications industries to combat fraud, is now being applied healthcare payments.

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Health Gaming and the Power of Social

Americans love to play video games. In 2010, the gaming industry generated more than $25 billion in revenue on digital games, which includes software and content sold for home-based consoles, portable gaming, and digital and social games, according to market research company the NPD Group. In the same year, 72% of American households reported playing computer or video games.


As the gaming industry has grown, so, too, has an interest in harnessing the power of play to help consumers improve their health. Finding entertaining ways of getting people to eat a healthier diet, exercise more or keep track of and treat chronic illness is becoming big business.


"It's clearly a growing market," said Bill Ferguson -- editor-in-chief of the Games for Health Journal: Research, Development, and Clinical Applications, a new peer-reviewed journal dedicated to game technology that improves physical and mental health and well-being.

 

 

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Study: Scandinavian countries could save EUR billions a year with remote monitoring

Scandinavian countries could save between EUR 1.25 billion and EUR 2.4 billion annually through the introduction of remote monitoring for the elderly, says a study by the Boston Consulting Group into the global prospects for mobie health which was commissioned by Norwegian operator Telenor. The study says the potential savings from remote monitoring vary between Denmark (EUR 1.25 billion), Norway (EUR 1.5 billion) and Sweden (EUR 2.4 billion). Telenor has previously released a few highlights from this study at this year’s Mobile World Congress but this is the first publication of the full version of the report. Read it here.
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Improving modern medicine: Why social media is just what the doctor ordered

Improving modern medicine: Why social media is just what the doctor ordered | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
These days, particularly in the wake of Facebook’s $5 billion S-1 filing, few will argue the explosive impact that social media is having on the way we live.

 

We see it in the way relationships build, the way messages spread, and the tremendous amount of data that’s been assembled about who we are and what we do.

 

The potential is huge; but until very recently, physicians have been largely unable to take full advantage of what these connections have to offer. Specifically, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 prevents doctors from using email or text messaging, much less open platforms like Facebook or Twitter, to communicate about patient care without risk of being fined or fired.

 

Still, the potential for physician-focused, web-based networks is huge, and HIPAA-compliant tools and sites have indeed started to take shape and populate.

 

Healthcare itself has been (often rightly) criticized as slow to change. In fact, Dr. Leslie Saxon recently published an insightful article on why the Internet hasn’t yet had any real impact on how medicine is practiced.

 

But research has shown that as far as technology goes, doctors themselves have proven to be early adopters. Having seen the kinds of conversations that have already begun to take place, I strongly believe that the future of digital medicine will be anchored in these kinds of connections.

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Patients choose hospitals based on social media

Patients choose hospitals based on social media | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

With one-third of consumers using social media for seeking or sharing medical information, 41 percent say tools like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and online forums influence their choice of a specific hospital, medical facility or doctor, according to Tuesday's report from consulting firm PwC.

 

In a survey of more than a thousand consumers, more than two-fifths of individuals said social media did affect their choice of a provider or organization. Forty-five percent said it would affect their decision to get a second opinion; 34 percent said it would influence their decision about taking a certain medication and 32 percent said it would affect their choice of a health insurance plan.

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Apple’s approach unleashed on EMR development

Perhaps one of Steve Jobs’ greatest legacies is the iPhone and the app ecosystem that it supports.

 

Rather than trying to define and develop every bit of functionality that an iPhone could offer, Apple handed the opportunity to do so to hundreds of other organizations, large and small. Apple gave up some control in exchange for unprecedented growth in market share and, ultimately, stock price.

 

Imagine if a similar approach was applied to the design of EMRs and other eHealth applications. Might the same level of innovation and user adoption result? A team led by Harvard University seems to think so and was awarded $15M by the U.S. Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT to turn their ideas into reality.

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iHT2 says health IT key to pop health

Managing population health requires new skill sets, new infrastructures and automation, according to new research from the Institute for Health Technology Transformation (iHT2).

 

The findings are from the Automating Population Health Research Project, which seeks to educate the healthcare industry on how best to apply technology in meeting the challenges of population health management.

 

“Population Health Management: A Roadmap for Provider-Based Automation in a New Era of Healthcare” was prepared in consultation with a broad range of industry experts, iHT2 officials say.

 

To make the transition from fee-for-service reimbursement to accountable care, which depends on the ability to improve population health, providers will need to automate many routine tasks, ranging from identification of care gaps and risk stratification to patient engagement, care management, and outcomes measurement, researchers found.

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How to Use YouTube for Healthcare Content Marketing

How to Use YouTube for Healthcare Content Marketing | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

In the last seven years, YouTube has become the most compelling social site for video sharing. According to Katrina Radic with Branding Magazine:

 

“YouTube claimed 60 hours of uploads per minute and 4 billion views per day. That’s up 25 percent in the past eight months and the equivalent of more than half the world’s population watching a video every day.”

 

YouTube created a funny little site called onehourpersecond.com to visually illustrate the effects of these statistics (Be sure to check it out – it’s a lot of fun to watch!)

 

When done right video and healthcare content marketing work together perfectly. Hospitals come across as being sincere and helpful, wanting to help people solve their most personal heath problems, when they use video to tell compelling stories.

 

Another reason why YouTube is a great platform for healthcare marketers is because they can easily minimize their engagement risk and focus on offering content that has value to the end user.

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Survey analysis: Cloud use in health IT

Survey analysis: Cloud use in health IT | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Cloud computing offers many advantages for healthcare organizations, but there are some drawbacks to the technology as well. Healthcare IT News recently asked its readers if their organizations plan on implementing cloud computing. A large majority has cloud on their radar.

 

Forty-eight percent said they plan on making cloud computing part of their organization’s health IT infrastructure, while 33 percent are already using cloud.

 

Cloud computing has quickly made inroads in the health IT space. It is an effective data storage method and helps facilitate exchange between providers.

 

Only 19 percent of respondents indicated they are not going for the cloud. Security issues surrounding cloud computing might be one reason why some providers are not adopting the technology.

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