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The ways in which technology benefits healthcare
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symtym: EHR Adoption a Power Law?

symtym: EHR Adoption a Power Law? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The graphs from the article (infra) would seem to suggest that EHR adoption (either basic or full) is a linear (proportionate) process, where the scaling factor is “α”:

 

But, as with most endeavors—wonder if it is more than a proportionality? The article further suggests that physician payments may suffice—more money (more “α”) and more adoption in a linear manner. If adoption has a power law (non–linear) relationship with time; then what are the factors that affect “κ”? Utility? Ubiquity? Both carry significant inertia (beyond a critical adoption level) that is most likely non–linear.

 

Abstract. [M]ore than half of all office–based physicians were using electronic health record systems, but only about one–third of those physicians had systems with basic features such as the abilities to record information on patient demographics, view laboratory and imaging results, maintain problem lists, compile clinical notes, or manage computerized prescription ordering.…[A]doption of electronic health record systems across geographic regions converged from 2002 through 2011, adoption continued to lag for non–primary care specialists, physicians age fifty–five and older, and physicians in small (1–2 providers) and physician-owned practices.…

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The financial impact of health information exchange on emergency department care

The national experience with HIE is growing, both in terms of the number of sites exploring this technology16 17 and the business models that rely on it. Unfortunately, because of the economic immaturity of HIE, most HIE benefits are estimates.18–20 Reports of measurable financial benefit are few in number.21 22

 

Presenting convincing evidence is a challenge because of the relatively small but growing number of HIE efforts, the differences in HIE, the ways in which HIE is enabled and used, and the methodology challenge of measuring value in ‘real world’ settings. Although HIE among institutions usually takes place through a single intermediary HIO, as more organizations share data with one another on a point-to-point basis, measuring the marginal contribution of each external data source and thus the overall value of HIE will become even more problematical.23

 

As part of our 6-year effort providing access to clinical and administrative data through a single HIO supporting HIE for every consenting patient treated in any of the region's major hospitals and in some ambulatory care clinics, we conducted a 2-year study examining overall use, user perspectives, and a range of other factors.24–26 We report here the direct financial impact study results by determining how HIE data access by emergency department (ED) physicians affected hospital admissions and diagnostic testing.

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Pharma and e-health: The emergence of activist patients

Pharma and e-health: The emergence of activist patients | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

While pharma knows patients have migrated online, the industry’s understanding of where those patients spend their time and how they leverage the e-health platform remains murky. What percentage of all Internet users are e-patients? Are those e-patients more likely to use Facebook or Wikipedia, apps or websites like askthedoctor.com, mobile or laptops?

 

This understanding is critical if pharma companies want to manage social media and the online space. At eyeforpharma’s Pharma Forecasting Excellence conference in Berlin, Milos Graonic, a senior vice president at Nielsen, discussed the emergence of what he calls “activist patients” and crunched the numbers on their burgeoning e-health movement.

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As Smartphone Usage Expands, Survey Says Nurses and Nursing Students Want Mobile Access to Credible Drug Data

Nurses and future nurses are using smartphones at the bedside, and want immediate access to drug reference tools.

 

A recent survey of nearly 4,000 nurses and nursing students found that more and more nurses are turning to mobile technology to help them provide efficient and effective care. Conducted by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (LWW), publisher of the top-selling Nursing 2013 Drug Handbook, the survey found that 85 percent of nurses and students want a smartphone app version of the drug guide. 

 

LWW's poll of 3,900 nurses and nursing students found that:


71 percent of nursing professionals use a smartphone for their job


66 percent of students use a smartphone for nursing school


85 percent of respondents want a mobile app version of a drug guide, while 89 percent want access to both an app version and the traditional print version

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Why technology is great for your health

Why technology is great for your health | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
Among all the reports of hackers stealing sensitive information from government agencies -- and individuals -- it's easy to forget that technology is often used for good.
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8 common questions about HL7

What is HL7?

 

Interoperability, or the back-and-forth exchange of patient health data among different organizations, is seen as the "ultimate IT goal of the modern healthcare system," when discussing meaningful use, HITECH and the Affordable Care Act, said Brull. "One of the major challenges to healthcare interoperability is defining common standards for structured content of healthcare data and the transport of that data between different systems, created by different vendors," he said. Creating consensus behind a common healthcare standard is the mission of HL7, which was founded in 1987. "The HL7 Standard was created and has since become widely adopted by vendors worldwide to define content," said Brull.

 

This and 7 other questions at http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/8-common-questions-about-hl7

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Why social media is just what the doctor ordered

Why social media is just what the doctor ordered | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
These days, particularly in the wake of Facebook’s $5 billion S-1 filing, few will argue the explosive impact that social media is having on the way we live.

 

We see it in the way relationships build, the way messages spread, and the tremendous amount of data that’s been assembled about who we are and what we do.

 

The potential is huge; but until very recently, physicians have been largely unable to take full advantage of what these connections have to offer. Specifically, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 prevents doctors from using email or text messaging, much less open platforms like Facebook or Twitter, to communicate about patient care without risk of being fined or fired.

 

Still, the potential for physician-focused, web-based networks is huge, and HIPAA-compliant tools and sites have indeed started to take shape and populate.

 

Healthcare itself has been (often rightly) criticized as slow to change. In fact, Dr. Leslie Saxon recently published an insightful article on why the Internet hasn’t yet had any real impact on how medicine is practiced.

 

But research has shown that as far as technology goes, doctors themselves have proven to be early adopters. Having seen the kinds of conversations that have already begun to take place, I strongly believe that the future of digital medicine will be anchored in these kinds of connections.

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Medigram app allows HIPAA compliant group text messaging between doctors

Medigram app allows HIPAA compliant group text messaging between doctors | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

A new initiative currently being trialed aims to enhance and improve communication between healthcare professionals. Medigram is an app of sorts whose aim is to provide HIPAA compliant secure text messaging between healthcare professionals.

Currently, the primary method of contacting a physician is via a pager which is generally only one way communication.

 

Furthermore, there are often issues such as trying to find a phone which means that the current system is relatively inefficient.

 

Having recognized this, the team at Medigram have designed a mobile app which they hope will revolutionize communication.

 

The free app brings HIPAA compliant group text messaging between doctors who are signed up to the service. Medigram is currently in closed beta with physicians at Stanford Hospital, Lucille Packard Children’s Hospital and the Palo Alto VA Hospital.

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9 Tablets Fit For Doctors

9 Tablets Fit For Doctors | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Since healthcare pros have embraced tablets in a big way, tablet makers have come up with a few design and feature twists for this demanding audience.

 

http://www.informationweek.com/news/galleries/healthcare/mobile-wireless/232500058

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Healthcare companies still don't "Get" Social Media

Healthcare companies still don't "Get" Social Media | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

"Social media is changing the nature of healthcare interaction, and health organizations that ignore this virtual environment may be missing opportunities to engage consumers."

 

That was the very ominous and foerboding opening line from a press release announcing the findings of a report done by the Health Research Institute (HRI) at PwC US.

 

Anytime I see the words "engage" and "missing" I am automatically intrigued because as we all know it's all about engagement: how to get engaged with your customers, how to stay engaged with your customers and how to ensure they stay engaged with you.

 

The report compared the social media activity of hospitals, pharma companies and health insurers to that of community sites and as you can see there is no comparison as community sites had 24 times more social media activity than corporate sites.

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How to Prepare For and Execute An Online Presence

How to Prepare For and Execute An Online Presence | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The world of healthcare is inherently siloed, tethered, fragmented and prone to poor communication and collaboration. Today, healthcare workers solve their problems via traditional methods that are often costly, inefficient, nor timely. Increasingly, more savvy healthcare workers are looking outside the system to digital media and communities for answers, but are challenged with uncertainty over concepts of usefulness, practicality, bandwidth issues, “ROI” and privacy concerns.

 

Establishing a digital presence is rapidly becoming a necessity for healthcare professionals, medical practices, and institutions. Many have recognized this fact… yet many more have not.

 

At its heart, digital media is about people, it is about relationships, and it is about communication. A social media presence is about educating, engaging and growing your audience, improving outcomes, compliance and potentially the bottom line of your practice.

 

 

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Social media: how doctors can contribute

On April 18, The General Medical Council, which regulates medical practice in the UK, opened up its draft guidance on doctors' use of social media for consultation. Comments can be made until June 13, and the results will be published by the end of the year.

 

The guidance emphasises the need to maintain patient confidentiality, provide accurate information, treat colleagues with respect, avoid anonymity online if writing in a professional capacity, be aware of how content is shared, review privacy settings and online presence, declare conflicts of interest, and maintain separate personal and professional profiles.

 

This conservative approach is not dissimilar to existing guidance from medical associations. Accepting Facebook friend requests from patients is, in general, not advised. But what of situations where doctors and patients are genuine friends? What, too, of the benefits of doctors providing medical information via blogs, Twitter, or Facebook?

 

Current guidance focuses more on the risks than the benefits of doctors' use of social media.

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Wishful thinking in medical education: Doctors’ use of social media - some thoughts prior to publication of GMC guidance

Wishful thinking in medical education: Doctors’ use of social media - some thoughts prior to publication of GMC guidance | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

More than half the UK population now use Facebook. And more new users are over 50 rather than under 50. The dominance of Facebook means that if you are not there you are likely to miss out on what is happening with your family or friends. For most of us our use of Facebook has nothing to do with being a doctor.

 

It is about being a mother, nephew, or friend. And it is because we want to protect these people that we care about, and ourselves, that we check our privacy settings and make sure that we are not publishing photos of our nearest and dearest to the world.


So if most of our social media use is about who we are when we are not at work do we need guidance from the GMC? What does using social media have to do with being a doctor at all?

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How IT Creates Lasting Health Benefits

Tom Priselac: The Cedars-Sinai Health System's mission spans patient care, medical education, clinical research, community services for the uninsured, and improving health status. There's no way for us to deliver high-quality care in a cost-effective way without using IT as a strategic differentiator. In 2007, we embarked on an electronic medical records (EMR) initiative called CS-Link.


Darren Dworkin: As CIO, I looked at the processes that EMR would affect and how improvements across all divisions of this $2.5 billion organization would enable business growth and enhance the patient experience. The tagline for the project, now in its second-to-last phase, was "One Patient, One Record," stressing collaboration. We spent time convincing stakeholders to view EMR as an opportunity to redesign how they work and improve business processes. One of the most visible outcomes of CS-Link for patients and caregivers will be a portal that bridges the silos in the healthcare network. This portal will eventually be available to all our patients. (For more on Cedars-Sinai, see "Can Watson, IBM's Supercomputer, Cure Cancer?")

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4 tips for leveraging big data

1. Understand what kind of data you have, and where it's stored.

 

One of the biggest challenges for hospitals, Richmond said, is recognizing what data is available and retrieving it from where it's stored. "Hospitals are largely unaware of how data can be deployed to help them improve the value of what they're delivering and the care they're giving, and how it can help them grow," he said.

 

"What we find almost universally is hospitals discover all the nooks and crannies in their institutions where they have valuable data assets."

 

These assets could be in the form of labor data bases containing employee information, patient level transactions or other encounter data, or even time-stamped data telling how patients are moving through the OR or ED. "It's about identifying where these assets are and [combining] them," Richmond said. "That's why we call it 'connecting the dots,' to give them views not just within these data streams, but also across them in a combinatorial way."

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Why reference models matter in healthcare IT?

There is one fundamental thing in this business you have to get right, if you want to succeed: requirements.

 

Recently, I heard a question targeted at my colleagues at Ocean, something in the lines of “what do you think is your greatest accomplishment ?”

 

Ocean’s software stack has a lot of impressive components, the template designer with its TDO support, the back end repository, Tom’s Eiffel work that is called the Archetype workbench, and clinical knowledge manager are all polished pieces of software with a lot of work behind them (and don’t forget the archetype designer)

 

However, my pick would not be one of these if I were to choose greatest thing out there. I’d choose the RM, the reference model of openEHR. Why? Well, it is because I have a past that has lots and lots of software development. The vendor that is trying to deliver a product to the clinician stands between the clinician an the technical infrastructure, code and hardware.

 

If you work with all the common approaches and tools of recent times, that is, if you’re doing Object Oriented development with a mainstream language such as C# or Java, it is highly likely that you’ll go through the well known lifecycle of an application. Even if you use agile methods and good practices such as test driven development, there is one fundamental thing in this business you have to get right, if you want to succeed: requirements.

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Physicians In Nonprimary Care And Small Practices And Those Age 55 And Older Lag In Adopting Electronic Health Record Systems

By 2011 more than half of all office-based physicians were using electronic health record systems, but only about one-third of those physicians had systems with basic features such as the abilities to record information on patient demographics, view laboratory and imaging results, maintain problem lists, compile clinical notes, or manage computerized prescription ordering.

 

Basic features are considered important to realize the potential of these systems to improve health care. We found that although trends in adoption of electronic health record systems across geographic regions converged from 2002 through 2011, adoption continued to lag for non–primary care specialists, physicians age fifty-five and older, and physicians in small (1–2 providers) and physician-owned practices.

 

Federal policies are specifically aimed at encouraging primary care providers and small practices to achieve widespread use of electronic health records. To achieve their nationwide adoption, federal policies may also have to focus on encouraging adoption among non–primary care specialists, as well as addressing persistent gaps in the use of electronic record systems by practice size, physician age, and ownership status.

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iPad EHR interoperability progressing as virtualization improves

Few health IT leaders outside Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center CIO John Halamka, M.D., or his peers saw the iPad as a health care game-changer upon its release two years ago. Now however, CIOs increasingly view iPad EHR implementations as a way to promote meaningful use compliance among physicians, who love the device. Meanwhile, virtualization vendors are making those implementations more workable.

 

The increase in iPad EHR use also pushes some facilities closer to joining the "bring your own device" -- or BYOD -- movement, which brings its own security and compliance challenges. On the plus side, adopting a BYOD policy shifts the cost of purchasing the tablet to the employee, as well as the hassles of administering hardware upgrades.

 

If you're an IT pro working for a health care provider and not already involved in an iPad EHR implementation, chances are you will be, soon: The iPad represents a significant slice of a mobile connectivity pie that will reshape health care, according to Deloitte's 2011-12 Open Mobile survey, which calls health care the sector most likely to benefit from 4G technology in the coming years.

 

"Mobile is going to be a big part of health care," said Harry Greenspun, M.D., senior advisor at Deloitte Center for Health Solutions, who noted that health care lags a bit behind other market sectors. "People always ask me, 'What does the future of health care look like?' About like the present of every other industry. When you look at how mobile has transformed retail and finance and travel and every other aspect of our lives -- health care is going through the same transformation."

 

The biggest interoperability problem health care software vendors must solve, Greenspun said, is making data ubiquitous despite the wild variation in screen sizes and operating systems. That, while taking into account workflow issues. "Tablets are great for consuming information, but for a lot of folks [tablets are] challenging to generate a lot of information," he said.

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Health IT Makes Health Care Convenient

Health IT can free you to focus on your health instead of the everyday hassles of managing your health care.

 

Health information technology (health IT) can make your interactions with the health care system more convenient, more reliable, and less time consuming.

 

Some examples include:

 

Faster, more accurate prescriptions
E-prescribing systems automatically send orders to the pharmacy for you so your medicine can be ready for pickup when you arrive, saving waiting time. E-prescribing can also reduce the potential medication errors such as those made by messy handwriting on a paper prescription.

 

Rapid information sharing
When a provider adds patient notes or test results to your EHR, that information may be available to all health care providers authorized to view your records, so they can have access to the most up to date information about your health. Some health care providers may allow you to access your own health information directly, meaning you no longer have to wait to hear back from your doctor for information such as test results that are normal and may not require an explanation.

 

Reduced paperwork
As a patient, you have probably answered the same questions about personal information and medical history dozens of times on seemingly identical forms. When health care providers share your electronic health information, you may not need to write down the same facts repeatedly.

 

Reduced unnecessary tests
Doctors sometimes order tests that you’ve had before simply because they do not have easy access to prior results. If all your test results are recorded in EHRs that can talk to each other, a health care provider can see prior test results that are available and order only truly necessary tests and procedures, saving time, money, and discomfort while reducing risk.

 

Better follow-up, better follow-through
Many EHRs incorporate reminder systems for both you and your doctor. For example, some EHRs remind your doctor to follow up with you about ongoing health conditions or to offer you information or services in response to changes in your health. At the same time, some EHRs can send you email or text message reminders about making or keeping appointments, staying current with treatment and medications, and other ways to improve health.

 

Secure access to information
In the event of a natural disaster or other tragedy, having your records in an EHR should make it easier to reassemble your records, and to make them available to providers away from home in the event that you need to relocate temporarily or permanently. The Federal Government requires certified systems to meet security standards so that professionals and others you designate can see only the information they need in order to manage your care effectively; your State Government may require additional protections. Learn more about the security of your health information.

 

 

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Terminologies profiling IT usage within Healthcare

Health Telematics
Health Telematics is a composite term for health-related activities, services and systems, carried out over a distance by means of information and communications technologies, for the purposes of global health promotion, disease control, and health care, as well as education, management, and research for health.

 

eHealth
E-health is the combined use in the health sector of electronic communication and information technology (digital data transmitted, stored and retrieved electronically) for clinical, education and administrative purposes, both at the local site and at a distance.

 

mHealth
mHealth (also written as m-health or mobile health) is a term used for the practice of medicine and public health, supported by mobile devices. The term is most commonly used in reference to using mobile communication devices, such as mobile phones, tablet computers and PDAs, for health services and information. The mHealth field has emerged as a sub-segment of eHealth

 

Telemedicine
The delivery of health care services, where distance is a critical factor, by health care professionals using information and communications technologies for the exchange of valid information for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease and injuries, research and evaluation, and for the continuing education of health care providers, all in the interest of advancing the health of individuals and their communities.

 

Electronic Medical Record (EMR)
An electronic record of health-related information on an individual that can be created, gathered, managed, and consulted by authorized clinicians and staff within one health care organization.

 

Electronic Health Record (EHR)
An electronic record of health-related information on an individual that conforms to nationally recognized interoperability standards and that can be created, managed, and consulted by authorized clinicians and staff across more than one health care organization.

 

Personal Health Record (PHR)
An electronic record of health-related information on an individual that conforms to nationally recognized interoperability standards and that can be drawn from multiple sources while being managed, shared, and controlled by the individual.

 

Health Information Exchange (HIE)
Health information exchange (HIE) is the electronic movement of health-related information among organizations according to nationally recognized standards. It refers to the process of reliable and interoperable electronic health-related information sharing conducted in a manner that protects the confidentiality, privacy, and security of the information.

 

Integrated EHR
This refers to an EHR that is integrated with practice management software. Typical choices include purchasing a fully integrated product which performs all the functions of practice management software, or a stand-alone EHR which is compatible with an existing practice management system.

 

 

Disclaimer: The definitions have been used as is from multiple sources.

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How Mobile, Cloud, Are Transforming Healthcare

How Mobile, Cloud, Are Transforming Healthcare | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
Spurred by a combination of government incentives and aging technology, healthcare is entering an IT renaissance with mobile and cloud technologies at the center.

 

Spurred by a combination of government incentives and aging technology, healthcare is entering an IT renaissance. Mobile and cloud technologies are at the heart of healthcare's transformation. Tablets are replacing paper medical charts, private clouds are enabling secure access to medical records, and mobile cloud collaboration tools are improving information sharing among medical professionals and academics.

 

Mobile and cloud healthcare services are also being used to solve a wide range of challenges, such as fraud, remote diagnostics, and patient CRM.

 

In addition to storing medical records, cloud services are also stepping in to fight healthcare fraud. It's estimated that fraud accounts for as much as $260 billion, or at least 10 percent of annual U.S. healthcare expenses. Predictive modeling, commonly used in the financial services and telecommunications industries to combat fraud, is now being applied healthcare payments.

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Health Gaming and the Power of Social

Americans love to play video games. In 2010, the gaming industry generated more than $25 billion in revenue on digital games, which includes software and content sold for home-based consoles, portable gaming, and digital and social games, according to market research company the NPD Group. In the same year, 72% of American households reported playing computer or video games.


As the gaming industry has grown, so, too, has an interest in harnessing the power of play to help consumers improve their health. Finding entertaining ways of getting people to eat a healthier diet, exercise more or keep track of and treat chronic illness is becoming big business.


"It's clearly a growing market," said Bill Ferguson -- editor-in-chief of the Games for Health Journal: Research, Development, and Clinical Applications, a new peer-reviewed journal dedicated to game technology that improves physical and mental health and well-being.

 

 

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Study: Scandinavian countries could save EUR billions a year with remote monitoring

Scandinavian countries could save between EUR 1.25 billion and EUR 2.4 billion annually through the introduction of remote monitoring for the elderly, says a study by the Boston Consulting Group into the global prospects for mobie health which was commissioned by Norwegian operator Telenor. The study says the potential savings from remote monitoring vary between Denmark (EUR 1.25 billion), Norway (EUR 1.5 billion) and Sweden (EUR 2.4 billion). Telenor has previously released a few highlights from this study at this year’s Mobile World Congress but this is the first publication of the full version of the report. Read it here.
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Improving modern medicine: Why social media is just what the doctor ordered

Improving modern medicine: Why social media is just what the doctor ordered | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
These days, particularly in the wake of Facebook’s $5 billion S-1 filing, few will argue the explosive impact that social media is having on the way we live.

 

We see it in the way relationships build, the way messages spread, and the tremendous amount of data that’s been assembled about who we are and what we do.

 

The potential is huge; but until very recently, physicians have been largely unable to take full advantage of what these connections have to offer. Specifically, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 prevents doctors from using email or text messaging, much less open platforms like Facebook or Twitter, to communicate about patient care without risk of being fined or fired.

 

Still, the potential for physician-focused, web-based networks is huge, and HIPAA-compliant tools and sites have indeed started to take shape and populate.

 

Healthcare itself has been (often rightly) criticized as slow to change. In fact, Dr. Leslie Saxon recently published an insightful article on why the Internet hasn’t yet had any real impact on how medicine is practiced.

 

But research has shown that as far as technology goes, doctors themselves have proven to be early adopters. Having seen the kinds of conversations that have already begun to take place, I strongly believe that the future of digital medicine will be anchored in these kinds of connections.

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Patients choose hospitals based on social media

Patients choose hospitals based on social media | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

With one-third of consumers using social media for seeking or sharing medical information, 41 percent say tools like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and online forums influence their choice of a specific hospital, medical facility or doctor, according to Tuesday's report from consulting firm PwC.

 

In a survey of more than a thousand consumers, more than two-fifths of individuals said social media did affect their choice of a provider or organization. Forty-five percent said it would affect their decision to get a second opinion; 34 percent said it would influence their decision about taking a certain medication and 32 percent said it would affect their choice of a health insurance plan.

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