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The ways in which technology benefits healthcare
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Left Atrial Pressure Monitoring To Optimize Heart Failure (Trial)

Left Atrial Pressure Monitoring To Optimize Heart Failure (Trial) | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
LAPTOP-HF is designed to investigate a new way to help treat heart failure. Since many heart failure patients are frequently hospitalized and often feel poorly, the hope is that this system may help your doctor adjust your medications before you develop symptoms or require hospitalization.


This is accomplished by measuring pressure in the heart and then each day providing you with your physician’s updated recommended medications and dosages. These may change daily depending on your condition. This is very similar to how diabetics manage their glucose levels. -


See more at: http://www.kumed.com/heart-care/clinical-services/heart-care-clinical-trials/laptop-hf#sthash.EfEC2fvM.dpuf


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72% of Consumers Are Willing To See A Doctor Via Telehealth Video Conferencing

72% of Consumers Are Willing To See A Doctor Via Telehealth Video Conferencing | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

72% of consumers across the eight countries are willing to see a doctor via telehealth video conferencing for non-urgent appointments, according to Intel survey.


The study, “Intel Healthcare Innovation Barometer” was conducted across eight countries by Penn Schoen Berland in Brazil, China, France, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan and the United States from July 28 to Aug. 15, 2013 among a representative sample of 12,000 adults ages 18 and older.

The findings concludes that most people are optimistic about technology innovations advancing healthcare, are open to sharing healthcare information for the greater good and receptive to using sensors for personalized care.

As the technology of remote patient monitoring solutions and mobile health applications improve, consumers now have the ability to connect with their providers in a variety of ways to embrace new behaviors

Other key findings of the Intel Healthcare Innovation Barometer include:


Improving Personal Care and Self-Monitoring with Technology

  • Sixty-six percent of people say they would prefer a personalized healthcare regimen designed specifically for them based on their genetic profile or biology.
  • Fifty-three percent of people say they would trust a test they personally administered as much or more than if performed by a doctor.

Sharing Anonymous Digital Health Records for the Common Good

  • People are more willing to anonymously share their health records or genetic information than their banking information or phone records.
  • More than three-quarters (76 percent) of respondents over the age of 55 would be willing to anonymously share results of lab tests or health monitoring to contribute to research databases compared with 64 percent of millennials.
  • India is the country most willing to share healthcare information to aid innovation.

Emerging Technology Tools for Increased In-Home Health Management

  • Half of those surveyed would trust a diagnosis delivered via video conference from their doctor.
  • Seventy-two percent are receptive to communication technologies that allow them to remotely connect to their doctor.
  • The innovation least likely to be incorporated by the global population is a robot performing surgery.
  • Almost half of respondents (43 percent) globally would trust themselves to monitor their own blood pressure and other basic vitals.


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Donovan Baldwin's curator insight, December 17, 2013 8:16 AM

We have seen this in sci-fi for years, and now it's coming true. Are you in? Would this be something YOU would go along with?

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4 Reasons Why Telemedicine May Be Here to Stay

4 Reasons Why Telemedicine May Be Here to Stay | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The concept of telemedicine is still in its infancy, but has some appeal to doctors and patients, especially in rural U.S. communities where doctors have great distances to cover for short in-person patient visits.


Medical technology watchers know the ‘telemedicine’ concept isn’t as far-fetched as it would have sounded a decade ago: patients can now connect with a doctor from home or a clinic using a web cam, and the provider can offer a basic diagnosis, a referral or a prescription. The concept is still in its infancy, but has some appeal to doctors and patients, especially in rural U.S. communities where doctors have great distances to cover for short in-person patient visits.


A Cisco study from last spring showed that a majority of 1,547 customers from 10 countries are willing to embrace this direction in health care. As many as 74 percent said they would be comfortable talking with their doctor in other ways besides in person, such as email, text, or video chat, and 80 percent of surveyed residents from North America said they’d feel comfortable with their medical information shared online.


In-person visits aren’t going away immediately, but more and more advantages are in the spotlight for using cutting edge technology:


Read more: http://www.33rdsquare.com/2014/01/4-reasons-why-telemedicine-may-be-here.html


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Telemedicine robots let doctors ‘beam’ into hospitals to evaluate patients, expanding access

Telemedicine robots let doctors ‘beam’ into hospitals to evaluate patients, expanding access | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The doctor isn’t in, but he can still see you now.


Remote presence robots are allowing physicians to “beam” themselves into hospitals to diagnose patients and offer medical advice during emergencies.


A growing number of hospitals in California and other states are using telepresence robots to expand access to medical specialists, especially in rural areas where there’s a shortage of doctors.


These mobile video-conferencing machines move on wheels and typically stand about 5 feet, with a large screen that projects a doctor’s face. They feature cameras, microphones and speakers that allow physicians and patients to see and talk to each other.


“Regardless of where the patient is located, we can be at their bedside in several minutes,” said Dr. Alan Shatzel, medical director of the Mercy Telehealth Network. “Literally, we compress time and space with this technology. No longer does distance affect a person’s ability to access the best care possible.”


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