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Health IT-Related Adverse Event Reporting Needs Improvement

Health IT-Related Adverse Event Reporting Needs Improvement | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Improved and standardized reporting across healthcare organizations is needed to better understand the impact of health information technology (IT) on adverse events, according to a report from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC).  


The Health Information Technology Adverse Event Reporting: Analysis of Two Databases studied the Common Formats used to encourage adverse event reporting in 2 Patient Safety Organizations: UHC and ECRI Institute.   After analyzing hundreds of thousands of adverse events from all causes reported from since January 2011 for UHC and October 2009 for ECRI, ONC found there are definite areas of improvement.  


“Healthcare organizations and health IT developers, working with PSOs, can use evidence like this to focus their efforts to use health IT to make care safer and to continuously improve the safety of health IT,” Kathy Kenyon, JD, senior policy analyst for ONC, wrote in a blog post.  


For instance, in the ECRI database, the Yes/No question on health IT involvement was answered only 4% of the time. UHC did better, although the question was still only answered roughly half of the time.  


An analysis of UHC’s database found the most common contributing factors to health IT-related events were communication among staff and team members (40%-42%), staff inattention (33%-34%), and accuracy of the data (21%-23%). Furthermore, a third of health IT-related events were medication-related, making them the most common type.  


However, despite the usefulness of UHC’s database, more than half of the health IT-related events were categorized as “other,” which makes it difficult to determine the clinical problem involved in these events, according to Ms Kenyon. -


See more at: http://www.ajmc.com/newsroom/Health-IT-Related-Adverse-Event-Reporting-Needs-Improvement#sthash.tEhiA8At.dpuf

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Big Data Peeps At Your Medical Records To Find Drug Problems

Big Data Peeps At Your Medical Records To Find Drug Problems | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

It's been tough to identify the problems that only turn up after medicines are on the market. An experimental project is now combing through data to get earlier, more accurate warnings.


No one likes it when a new drug in people's medicine cabinets turns out to have problems — just remember the Vioxx debacle a decade ago, when the painkiller was removed from the market over concerns that it increased the risk of heart attack and stroke.


To do a better job of spotting unforeseen risks and side effects, the Food and Drug Administration is trying something new — and there's a decent chance that it involves your medical records.


It's called Mini-Sentinel, and it's a $116 million government project to actively go out and look for adverse events linked to marketed drugs. This pilot program is able to mine huge databases of medical records for signs that drugs may be linked to problems.


The usual system for monitoring the safety of marketed drugs has real shortcomings. It largely relies on voluntary reports from doctors, pharmacists, and just plain folks who took a drug and got a bad outcome.


"We get about a million reports a year that way," says Janet Woodcock, the director of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. "But those are random. They are whatever people choose to send us."

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