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Why Behavioral Health Acutely Needs EHRs

Why Behavioral Health Acutely Needs EHRs | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
Legislation that incorporates psychiatric care into the acute-care spectrum and extends EHR incentives to behavioral health facilities has been proposed for going on five years now.


A show of hands: Who believes depression or bipolar disorder have no impact on the severity and treatment of a patient’s diabetes and COPD?

It’s an idea no practicing physician would support.


Yet time and again, we act as though mental illness and care can be kept separate from physical ailments.


Take Meaningful Use (MU), for example. The federal government believes healthcare must move into the digital age and is willing to pay hospitals to buy computer systems and electronic health records (EHRs).


But the financial rewards of demonstrated MU only extend to acute care hospitals and clinics, not psychiatric facilities, as though human health can be partitioned and compartmentalized.


While treating patients holistically has been accepted clinically for decades, some behavioral health advocates are turning up the pressure now to finally also bring behavioral health IT into the digital age. 


more at http://hitconsultant.net/2015/01/20/why-behavioral-health-acutely-needs-ehrs/


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Jason Traver's curator insight, February 16, 5:40 PM

A consultant's perspective on Behavioral Health. Pushing Behavioral Health past the red tape in EHR to drive improvements in care.

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Can EHRs power up the fight against epidemics?

Can EHRs power up the fight against epidemics? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Government health IT leaders say electronic health record systems can expand information sharing and help public health responders fight the spread Ebola and future viruses.


While the United States avoided a public health crisis from the Ebola virus, the possibility of an epidemic at home got government health IT leaders thinking about how electronic health records might be used to expand information sharing and help public health responders fight the spread of Ebola and future viruses.


There are significant hurdles to clear before the EHRs used in clinical care will be able to really help state, local and federal health officials track and respond to fast-moving outbreaks in real time, according to those at recent Health IT Policy Committee meeting on the potential for using EHRs to fight epidemics.


The problem of interoperability and data transfer between EHR systems, medical laboratories and public health databases is one big issue. More broadly, there is a lack of what experts call "bidirectionality" between health records, preventing health officials – either for technical or privacy reasons – from accessing individual patient records.


Ultimately, broader use of EHRs to detect and respond to epidemics will require changes in technology. The passive surveillance of patient EHRs using analytic tools could give greater velocity to detecting not just viral disease outbreaks, but environmental risks, contaminated food and medicine as well as other large-scale health problems that are clustered geographically or in certain demographic groups.


That’s not to say epidemiology is lacking in high-tech approaches. New York City, for example, was able to use cell phone location information and subway fare card data to conduct contact tracing on individuals that may have come into contact with the Ebola virus while traveling. However, aggregating that information, and making it available at scale through an EHR platform, appears to be a long way off.

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Can doctors actually keep up with the wearables market to make it worth your while?

Can doctors actually keep up with the wearables market to make it worth your while? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
With the wearables and health apps markets booming, where do doctors stand in terms of actually making use of the information?


So you are being proactive about your health by purchasing wearable devices and apps, but how helpful is it really if your doctor isn’t up to speed with the technology or able to interpret the data?


Dr. Paul Abramson, a primary care doctor in San Francisco told NPR that as much as these new devices are promoting good health generally, it’s not necessarily practical for doctors to interpret all of the data.

“Going through it and trying to analyze and extract meaning from it was not really feasible,” he says. “I get information from watching people’s body language, tics and tone of voice. Subtleties you just can’t get from a Fitbit or some kind of health app.”

Part of the issue is that FitBits and Apple Watches aren’t regulated by the FDA – they are considered “low-risk devices” and don’t require approval because they aren’t used for diagnosis or treatment. For that reason, it’s challenging for doctors to treat the data like valid information.

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Where Will Healthcare's Data Scientists Find The Rich Phenotypic Data They Need?

Where Will Healthcare's Data Scientists Find The Rich Phenotypic Data They Need? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The big hairy audacious goal of most every data scientist I know in healthcare is what you might call the Integrated Medical Record, or IMR, a dataset that combines detailed genetic data and rich phenotypic information, including both clinical and “real-world” (or, perhaps, “dynamic”) phenotypic data (the sort you might get from wearables).


The gold standard for clinical phenotyping are academic clinical studies (like ALLHAT and the Dallas Heart Study).  These studies are typically focused on a disease category (e.g. cardiovascular), and the clinical phenotyping on these subjects – at least around the areas of scientific interest — is generally superb.  The studies themselves can be enormous, are often multi-institutional, and typically create a database that’s independent of the hospital’s medical record.


Inevitably, large, prospective studies can take many years to complete.  In addition, there’s generally not much real world/dynamic measurement.


The other obvious source for phenotypic data is the electronic medical record (EMR).  The logic is simple: every patient has a medical record, and increasingly, especially in hospital systems, this is electronic – i.e. an EMR.  EMRs (examples include Epic and Cerner) generally contain lab values, test reports, provider notes, and medication and problem lists.  In theory, this should offer a broad, rich, and immediately available source of data for medical discovery.


DIY (enabled by companies such as PatientsLikeMe) represents another approach to phenotyping, and allows patients to share data with other members of the community.  The obvious advantages here include the breadth and richness of data associated with what can be an unfiltered patient perspective – to say nothing of the benefit of patient empowerment.  An important limitation is that the quality and consistency of the data is obviously highly dependent upon the individuals posting the information.


Pharma clinical trials would seem to represent another useful opportunity for phenotyping, given the focus on specific conditions and the rigorous attention to process and detail characteristic of pharmaceutical studies.  However, pharma studies tend to be extremely focused, and companies are typically reluctant to expand protocols to pursue exploratory endpoints if there’s any chance this will diminish recruitment or adversely impact the development of the drug.

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Best EHR systems of 2014: Physicians rank 5 key performance areas

Best EHR systems of 2014: Physicians rank 5 key performance areas | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
The performance of an electronic health record (EHR) system can mean the difference between a thriving practice and a struggling one. These systems impact every aspect of medical care, from the car


more at http://medicaleconomics.modernmedicine.com/medical-economics/news/best-ehr-systems-2014-physicians-rank-five-key-performance-areas


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Are Health Wearables Evangelists Fools?

Are Health Wearables Evangelists Fools? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Late last month, TechnologyAdvice released an interesting study looking at whether most people want to use health wearables such as fitness trackers and other tools for health purposes.


Here are the top-line results of this study:


- 75 percent of U.S. adults do not track their weight, diet, or exercise using a health tracking apps or devices

- 43.7 percent had no specific reason for not tracking their fitness 

- 27.2 percent won’t use these devices due to lack of interest

- 25.1 percent of adults are currently using either a fitness tracker or a smartphone app to monitor their health, weight, or exercise.


This sounds like pretty bad news for those who believe the era of health wearables is here. But, this study also raises another question: Are health wearables evangelists fools?


Fard Johnmar, Founder of Enspektos explains why relevancy is the key to boosting the adoption of health wearables.  


Read more at http://hitconsultant.net/2014/10/08/are-health-wearables-evangelists-fools/


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What Health IT Can Learn Fom the Food Network

What Health IT Can Learn Fom the Food Network | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Here are three lessons we can learn from Chopped:


More doesn’t necessarily mean better, the details are what matter. Any chef can tell you that one can cook a delicious spread, but over/under season the dish, and he or she will be doing the walk of shame. Those of us in health IT also know the importance of applying a discerning eye to data. We have seen the dangers of things such as note bloat and copy forward, and we need ensure that those who are accessing the health data are able to immediately find what they need. Just as you shouldn’t have to eat an entire bowl of spaghetti to find a meatball, you shouldn’t have to manually parse through a patient’s entire medical record to find a glucose level from last week.


Presentation is everything. My wife says, and she is always right, “you eat with your eyes first.” A good chef knows the importance of combining and arranging the ingredients of a dish in a way that is appetizing to the foodie. The same goes for personal health data. We can be tracking every heartbeat and measuring every level in our body, however, if it is not organized and presented in a meaningful way, it will not be accepted by physicians or health consumers.


Vision needs to become reality. Chefs who do not thoroughly think through the elements of their recipes often find themselves out of time or presenting a dish that differs from what they had envisioned. Similarly, while it is great to imagine the future of health IT, what we need right now are well-thought out, logical, and achievable solutions that transform even the most challenging ingredients into a delicacy (Remember the monkey brains served during the dinner scene in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom?).


more at http://innovationinsights.wired.com/insights/2014/07/health-can-learn-fom-food-network/


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Case study: Big data improves cardiology diagnoses by 17%

Case study: Big data improves cardiology diagnoses by 17% | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Big data analytics technology has been able to find patterns and pinpoint disease states more accurately than even the most highly-trained physicians.


The human brain may be nature’s finest computer, but artificial intelligences fed on big data are making a convincing challenge for the crown. In the realm of healthcare, natural language processing, associative intelligence, and machine learning are revolutionizing the way physicians make decisions and diagnose complex patients, significantly improving accuracy and catching deadly issues before symptoms even present themselves.


In this case study examining the impact of big data analytics on clinical decision making, Dr. Partho Sengupta, Director of Cardiac Ultrasound Research and Associate Professor of Medicine in Cardiology at the Mount Sinai Hospital, has used an associative memory engine from Saffron Technology to crunch enormous datasets for more accurate diagnoses.


Using 10,000 attributes collected from 90 metrics in six different locations of the heart, all produced by a single, one-second heartbeat, the analytics technology has been able to find patterns and pinpoint disease states more quickly and accurately than even the most highly-trained physicians.


more at http://healthitanalytics.com/2014/07/07/case-study-big-data-improves-cardiology-diagnoses-by-17/


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Software Spots Sensitive Traces in Health Records

Software Spots Sensitive Traces in Health Records | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

New software could give people greater control over how their personal health information is shared between doctors and medical institutions—provided that enough health providers decide to use the system.


Today a patient’s data typically stays within a hospital group or doctor’s practice. If you get care elsewhere you are essentially a blank slate unless a special request for your data is made, in which case the entire record becomes accessible. But many patients may not want their entire medical history to be accessible by everyone they see, so there is pressure to develop tools that can be used to limit access. One tricky issue is that redacting details of a diagnosis may not remove all the clues as to that condition, such as prescribed drugs or lab tests.


A new tool developed by computer scientists at the University of Illinois can figure out which parts of a record may inadvertently reveal aspects of a patient’s medical history. The idea is that as data-sharing proposals advance, the patient would decide what parts of his or her record to keep private. A clinician would get advice from the technology on how to amend the record to ensure that this occurs.


The software bases its recommendations on a machine-learning analysis of many other medical records. This reveals what details could be associated with things like mental health episodes, past drug abuse, or a diagnosis of a sexually transmitted disease when the record is shared with another hospital or doctor. The tool could eventually automatically remove those additional details to keep that information confidential.




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Digital health is going to need medical approval and a great UI

Digital health is going to need medical approval and a great UI | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

So far the internet of things hasn’t made much headway into patient care in the medical setting, but consumers are buying wellness devices for a variety of reasons. Will the medical world embrace that data?


The intersection of healthcare and connected devices was thrown into high relief these last few weeks as both Apple and Samsung unveiled ecosystems to take consumer health data and turn it into actionable intelligence.


But this week’s guests at the Weekly podacst at GigaOm are confident that as advanced as consumer-grade consumer grade health devices get, they won’t become something doctors are hot on for years to come — if ever.


In this week’s podcast Stacey Higginbotham discusses medical connected devices and where it may meet the consumer with Rick Valencia from Qualcomm Life. Will doctor’s prescribe our apps or devices? 


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Vigisys's curator insight, June 15, 2014 4:22 AM

Un podcast intéressant qui évoque les freins à l'utilisation médicale des objets connectés. On y évoque le besoin de valider les usages avec des études cliniques et d'adapter les interfaces à un usage professionnel. Que du bon sens !

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Health Domains for Sale: The Need for Global Health Internet Governance

Health Domains for Sale: The Need for Global Health Internet Governance | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Current controversy surrounding health domains is rooted in the Internet’s growing importance as a health information source. In 2013, the International Telecommunication Union estimated that 38.8% (2.7 billion) of the world’s population used the Internet. Many of these users are seeking important health information online. In the United States, surveys report 72% of online adults accessed the Internet to find health information primarily on the subjects of diseases and treatments . Other regions, including the European Union and emerging markets, have also shown marked increases in online health information seeking and self-diagnosing behavior.


The importance of establishing an inclusive yet reliable presence for health information online is critical to future global health outcomes given the growing importance of the health Internet. However, .health and many other health-related gTLDs are now on sale to private sector entities that largely permit open and unrestricted use. Yet, the globalized nature of the Internet, the public health need for privacy, security, and quality health information, and the rapid expansion of online health technologies demonstrate a critical need to ensure proper governance of future health domains. Focusing on the public good can be a first and crucial step to ensure an accurate, reliable, and evidence-based online presence for health for this generation and the next.




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If We Can't Get Genome Accuracy Right, Personalized Medicine Is a Pipe Dream

If We Can't Get Genome Accuracy Right, Personalized Medicine Is a Pipe Dream | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

If genomes are going to revolutionize personalized medicine, the first step will be sequencing the genome accurately.


It bears repeating just how far this tech has come: the price of sequencing a genome is rapidly coming down, as is the time it takes to do a sequence. It’s getting so easy that the price point is already well within the means of many middle class Americans, and the technology might soon prove useful enough to save lives. Proponents say that, in the future, personalized medicine will allow doctors to determine the specific genetic variants that predispose their patients to certain diseases, which will then help doctors to devise individualized—and more effective—treatments.


But with roughly six billion base pairs in the human genome, creating a truly accurate gene sequence is no easy task. Even the best sequencing techniques can have an error rate around 1 percent, which adds up to hundreds of thousands of errors. When diseases depend on single nucleotide insertions or changes, those errors can mean the difference between a misdiagnosis and an accurate one.


A group of researchers with the US government’s National Institute of Standards and Technology is trying to solve that problem with a program called Genome in a Bottle. With academic and commercial partners, the group is trying to create what is essentially one “perfect” human genome that can be a reference for sequencing labs. Though every genome is different, the places where sequencing errors most commonly happen are fairly well understood, and by comparing one sequence with a reference genome, doctors and researchers would be able to tell if they’ve made a mistake.


“We’re sitting here with billions of data pairs—it boggles the mind try to get that much information accurately determined,” said Marc Salit of NIST’s Genome Scale Measurements Group. “Even when we think we’re getting it right, a few missing bases or additional ones can make a huge difference.”


Salit and his colleague, Justin Zook, recently published a study in Nature Biotechnologydiscussing their solution to the problem. According to Salit, by sequencing the same genome many times and comparing the base pairs, they can create a reference that is much more accurate than what we already have.


more at http://motherboard.vice.com/read/if-we-cant-get-genome-accuracy-right-personalized-medicine-is-a-pipe-dream



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As 3D printing trend in healthcare continues, pediatricians form "think tank"

As 3D printing trend in healthcare continues, pediatricians form "think tank" | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Now that kids are using 3D printers to build their own new limbs, a group of Philadelphia doctors is exploring how to use the technology to build kid-sized devices.


A group of pediatric specialists at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia want to find out how 3D printing can be used to create customized devices for the complex needs of its pediatric patient populations.


One frustration of pediatrics is that it tends to be an area overlooked by medical device companies. Children represent a relatively small market that doesn’t lend itself to mass production. Adapting adult medical devices for children can be problematic. But when you factor in subtle developmental differences, that can make it more complicated to find the best medical device for children.


Dr. Jorge Galvez, an anesthesiologist at CHOP and a professor of anesthesiology and critical care at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, talked about the group at the kickoff of DreamIt Venture’s new program with CHOP. It began collaborating with University of Pennsylvania engineering students Nicholas McGill and Michael Rivera after they won a challenge by the Society for Technology in Anesthesia.


The annual contest this year turned its attention to 3D printing applications. It sought ideas for applying the technology to developing a Williams intubating airway that could be adjusted based on measurements from a CT or MRI scan. That particular technology is especially useful for a pediatric hospital because there’s a need for specialized devices for children with variations in the shapes of their airways.

Galvez said the idea is that the 3D printing think tank would develop applications for the technology across different pediatric specialties. Among the specialties represented in the group are cardiology; anesthesiology; ear, nose and throat; and orthopedics. “There’s a lot of low-hanging fruit in this area, such as customized prosthetics,” said Galvez. “The challenge is not about using the printer, but having the knowledge and expertise to know what the needs of each specialty are.”

The idea is that as the practice of 3D printing becomes more mature, customized devices could be developed more rapidly.




Read more: http://medcitynews.com/2014/02/pediatic-hospital-physicians-initiate-3d-printing-think-tank/#ixzz2tzkmX62K


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What technologies can hospitals look forward to in 2015?

As practices look to integrate newer and hopefully advanced technologies to help them reduce readmission rates and improve outcomes, there is a lot to consider.


Buzzwords abound, like big data and coordinated care, but what those things actually mean vary largely from one place to the next.


ECRI Institute’s 2015 Top 10 Hospital C-Suite Watch List discusses a blend of novel, new, and emerging technologies that will demand attention and planning over the next 12 to 18 months, plus important issues and programs affecting care processes and delivery in 2015 and beyond.

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Standardization vs. Personalization: Can Healthcare Do Both?

Standardization vs. Personalization: Can Healthcare Do Both? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Can we standardize and personalize healthcare at the same time? James Dias, CEO and Founder of Wellbe shares how we can do both to improve patient care.


Usually when personalization is mentioned in the world of healthcare thoughts jump to genetics and personalized medicine with custom cancer drugs and medical devices. However, there is another type of personalization that can be applied to healthcare, to make each patient feel like an individual, rather than just “one of the masses.”



The world of ecommerce discovered the value of personalized online experiences a decade ago and the additional revenue/branding/loyalty that can be generated from it. For example, the NikeiD website offers customers the ability to customize their own shoes. Who can forget the “Elf Yourself” campaign from Office Depot, where you could stick your friends’ and family’s faces on to happy dancing elves? With the new year upon us, fewer people are opting to buy regular old glossy calendars when a dozen photo sites will let you make a custom one from your personal photos.



Personalization is all around us, from the recommendation engines of Netflix and Amazon, to the custom radio stations you can create on Pandora. Smart programs have figured out what’s relevant to each of us and help filter the signal from the noise in today’s massive universe of information. As consumers, we engage and respond much more positively to these personalized experiences, which encourages loyalty and repeat business.


The psychology of personalization shows that engaging the customer in the process helps build a psychological and emotional attachment to their purchase. In addition, increasing customer participation boosts feelings of control and ensures satisfaction at the point of sale.


Similarly, by offering a personalized digital healthcare experience, we can increase patients’ ownership of their health and outcomes. Often it seems that patients feel they have no control over their outcomes, when actually the opposite is true. When they feel like active participants in their health journeys, it is more likely they will achieve the outcomes they desire, and they will feel like they got better value for their dollar.




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Inforth Technologies's curator insight, January 21, 9:12 AM

We have been preaching personalizing the NextGen EHR for years.  Not just personalization for patients, but for physicians and their practices.

Kim Kubiak's curator insight, January 21, 11:40 AM

"As consumers, we engage and respond much more positively to these personalized experiences, which encourages loyalty and repeat business."

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Desire For Portals Spans Generations

Desire For Portals Spans Generations | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Millennials and Baby Boomers alike want more from their EHR, especially access through portals.


Last year’s annual EHR survey from Xerox found patients desired more information on EHRs and thought their providers should give more EHR education. This year, Xerox reports their 2014 annual EHR survey finds patients desire access to their records through portals - and it’s not just younger patients who are looking for digital access.


Health Data Management reports about a third of patients said simple knowledge of portals was lacking. Of those who said they did not use portals, 35 percent did not even know a portal was available and 31 percent said their physician had never spoken to them about portals.


A second study by Technology Advice found 40 percent of patients don’t know if their provider offers an online portal, even though a third study showed simply taking to patients about portals increases their use.

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4 ways EHR vendors are building better systems

4 ways EHR vendors are building better systems | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Physicians continue to express dissatisfaction with the usability and the workflow features of electronic health records (EHRs), yet these information systems don’t seem to improve.


One reason, experts say, is that vendors have poured most of their research and development budgets into meeting the requirements for meaningful use (MU) and the International Classification of Diseases-10th revision (ICD-10).


Despite all of this, however, some innovations are starting to enhance the usability of EHRs.


These include


  • refinements in natural language processing,
  • advances in EHRs designed for mobile devices,
  • the addition of context to clinical decision support (CDS),
  • and the spread of direct clinical messaging.



- See more at:

http://medicaleconomics.modernmedicine.com/medical-economics/news/4-ways-vendors-are-building-better-systems#sthash.gWliusEw.dpuf


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'Instagram for doctors' takes off

'Instagram for doctors' takes off | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

An app which enables healthcare professionals to share photos is to be rolled out across western Europe by the end of the year.

The app was designed to enable doctors to share pictures of their patients, both with each other and with medical students.


So far, more than 150,000 doctors have uploaded case photos with the patient's identity obscured.


However, some experts have expressed concern about patient confidentiality.


Patients' faces are automatically obscured by the app but users must manually block identifying marks like tattoos.


Each photo is reviewed by moderators before it is added to the database.


more at: http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-29521986


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Will EHR data stand up in court?

Will EHR data stand up in court? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

While healthcare stakeholders naturally focus on the medical reliability of data recorded in EHRs, there's another question worth asking: Would the information EHRs contain stand up in a court of law? 


According to a new analysis published in the Ave Maria Law Review, the answer is a pretty clear "No."


There has been no shortage of debate among healthcare stakeholders concerning whether EHRs are reliable and, if not, how to make them so. But the three authors of the Ave Maria piece take, not surprisingly, a lawyer's view on the question of reliability. And almost from the beginning they point to some significant problems.


For example, they cited the fact that the data in EHRs are used, naturally, to determine payments to providers. Consequently, "there is a substantial financial incentive to attuning (sic) the record systems' functional priorities to assure that the resulting record artifact leverages the maximum payment, dissociated from its accuracy and reliability as a business record of patient care events."



Currently,  healthcare doesn't have a similarly stringent approach to its own record — but if it did, it seems clear that both doctors and patients would benefit.




Link to the rest of this article: http://www.govhealthit.com/news/will-ehr-data-stand-court

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5 Myths About Consumer Use of Digital Healthcare Services

5 Myths About Consumer Use of Digital Healthcare Services | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

A recent international survey by the McKinsey & Company consulting firm addresses some myths about consumer use of digital healthcare services.


Many healthcare executives believe that, due to the sensitive nature of medical care, patients don’t want to use digital services except in a few specific situations. Decision makers often cite relatively low usage of digital healthcare services. Results of this survey however reveal something quite different. 


The 5 myths debunked by this survey are as follows

Myth 1: People don’t want to use digital services for healthcareMyth 2: Only young people want to use digital services

Myth 3: Mobile health is the game changer
Myth 4: Patients want innovative features and apps
Myth 5: A comprehensive platform of service offerings is a prerequisite for creating value

More at http://www.healthdatamanagement.com/gallery/5-myths-about-consumer-use-of-digital-healthcare-services-48388-1.html



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EHRs Detect Depression When Many PCPs Can’t

EHRs Detect Depression When Many PCPs Can’t | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Depression is one of the hardest disorders to diagnose, yet it affects 14 percent of the world’s population. Researchers have found factors in EHRs may be key to predicting a diagnosis of depression.


While depression comes at a high cost to those who suffer from it, the actual price tag in the United States reaches over $44 billion annually. This takes into account, among other things, lost productivity and direct expenses. Depression is a diagnosis that is often missed by primary care physicians, despite the fact that it is the second most common chronic disorder they treat.


According to EHR Intelligence, researchers from Stanford University have worked to use EHR systems as a tool to help predict depression diagnoses. In the study, published by the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, researchers say valuable information already stored in the EHR can be used to predict depression up to a year in advance.


“Depression is a prevalent disorder difficult to diagnose and treat. In particular, depressed patients exhibit largely unpredictable responses to treatment,” explain researchers. “Many depressed patients are not even diagnosed … primary care physicians, who deliver the majority of care for depression, only identify about 50 percent of true depression cases.”


The Stanford team used EHR data including demographic data, ICD-9, RxNorm, CPT codes, progress notes, and pathology, radiology, and transcription reports. From these, they used a model which factored in three criteria: the ICD-9 code, the presence of a depression disorder term in the clinical text, and the presence of an anti-depressive drug ingredient term in the clinical text.


These factors were then compared to predict a diagnosis of depression, response to treatment, and determine the severity of the condition.


more at http://www.healthitoutcomes.com/doc/ehrs-detect-depression-when-many-pcps-can-t-0001


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Why medical expertise is a must-have for mHealth tech development

Why medical expertise is a must-have for mHealth tech development | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
When it comes to designing, developing and building new mobile healthcare tools, many of the most successful ventures typically have one factor in common: accredited healthcare expertise.


Proof is evident in the foray the Mayo Clinic has made with mHealth technology, as well as other pilots and deployments led by the healthcare institution and providers.


"Our culture of learning, innovation, and the desire to find answers has allowed Mayo to remain at the forefront of health and wellness, and we want to extend this expertise to people anywhere," Paul Limburg, M.D., medical director of Mayo Clinic Global Business Solutions, said in an announcement. "We collaborated with and invested in Better to create a powerful way for people to connect with Mayo Clinic in their homes and communities, wherever they are."


Other top medical institutions are also finding success with mHealth initiatives. For instance, Steven J. Hardy, Ph.D., a pediatric psychologist at Children's National Health System in the District of Columbia, wants to engage families and patients in conversations about how they're managing illness and use mobile gaming as the tool to do so.


Speaking with FierceMobileHealthcare in an exclusive interview, Hardy discussed a pilot the hospital is conducting for children with sickle cell disease. The kids play a game on a mobile platform (in this case, an iPad) that helps them with an often-overlooked symptom of sickle cell disease--memory loss.


And a Harvard Innovation Lab startup aims to bolster patient treatment by enhancing coordination and communication among caregivers with an mHealth app that lets healthcare teams text, share images and videos and always have a patient list within reach.



Read more: http://www.fiercemobilehealthcare.com/story/why-medical-expertise-must-have-mhealth-tech-development/2014-06-09


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Vigisys's curator insight, June 15, 2014 4:25 AM

De la nécessité d'impliquer les médecins, et notamment ceux qui ont une double compétence médecine - technologies de l'information, dans le design de la santé mobile, applications pour smartphones et tablettes, objets connectés etc. Beaucoup de médecins sont prêts à jouer le jeu, je crois, mais il faut d'abord définir le marché et les filières d'usage.

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Personalized medicine in psychiatry: problems and promises

Personalized medicine in psychiatry: problems and promises | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The central theme of personalized medicine is the premise that an individual’s unique physiologic characteristics play a significant role in both disease vulnerability and in response to specific therapies.


The major goals of personalized medicine are therefore to predict an individual’s susceptibility to developing an illness, achieve accurate diagnosis, and optimize the most efficient and favorable response to treatment. The goal of achieving personalized medicine in psychiatry is a laudable one, because its attainment should be associated with a marked reduction in morbidity and mortality.


In this review, we summarize an illustrative selection of studies that are laying the foundation towards personalizing medicine in major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. In addition, we present emerging applications that are likely to advance personalized medicine in psychiatry, with an emphasis on novel biomarkers and neuroimaging.


Excerpt From the Conclusion:


The prospect of personalized medicine in psychiatry more or less reflects ideals still largely unrealized. Currently, the field is at the information-gathering infancy stage.


The greatest progress can be expected at the intersections of the categories described above, such as gene × environment and genes × biomarkers, which will poise psychiatry to make biological system-based evaluations. Furthermore, some of the emerging applications, including imaging genomics, strengthen our conviction that the future for personalized medicine is highly promising.

 



more at http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/132


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From Scans, Doctors 3D Print Custom Heart Wraps to Deliver Treatments

From Scans, Doctors 3D Print Custom Heart Wraps to Deliver Treatments | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The buzz about 3D printing can at times give the impression that the technology is a panacea that makes all manufacturing cheaper. The truth is 3D printing has one very specific use case: It makes prototypes and custom, one-of-a-kind items cheaper and faster to make.


Medicine would seem like a prime beneficiary of this technology, potentially using 3D printing to provide patients with custom-made implants and stents. Yet, to date, medical researchers have focused on the most ambitious goals for the technology, such as replacement organs printed from a patient’s own stem cells, which need years of development before they reach average patients.


Recently, a somewhat more modest medical device — and one that could find its way relatively quickly into treatment protocols — was created using 3D printing. Researchers Igor Efimov from Washington University in St. Louis and John Rogers from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign used MRI and CT scans of rabbit and human hearts to 3D-print custom-fitting flexible mesh sacs that fit each heart perfectly and stayed in place as it beat.


“Each heart is a different shape, and current devices are one-size-fits-all and don’t at all conform to the geometry of a patient’s heart,” said Efimov.


Inside its fabric, the mesh can also hold sensors that monitor for signs of trouble and deliver electrical pulses, if needed. The sensors are embedded in the fabric using technology similar to what Google has said it will use in sugar-monitoring contact lenses, only more nuanced.


Doctors can position the sensors or electrodes more precisely using the wrap than by attaching them directly to the heart with sutures or adhesives, Efimov and Rogers state in a recent paper in Nature Communications. They demonstrate in the paper that sensors attached to the mesh (or multifunctional integumentary membrane) accurately measure temperature, mechanical strain and pH, and could deliver pulses of electricity.


Depending on the sensors used, the heart wrap could improve treatments for a range of disorders; it could also be used to deliver medication directly to where its needed. But the device was conceptualized specifically to treat ventricle deformities and arrhythmias. The arrhythmia atrial fibrillation affects about 4 million Americans; patients often undergo a surgery that destroys the heart’s own drummer, the atrioventricular node, and subsequently receive a pacemaker.

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Apple Patents Fitness-Tracking Earbuds That Can Read Your Heartbeat

Apple Patents Fitness-Tracking Earbuds That Can Read Your Heartbeat | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office just granted Apple a patent for a new kind of biometric sensor that, unlike other wearables we've seen so far, connects to you via your ear. The patent applies to a sensor that can be embedded in a pair of earbuds or headphones, which then hoovers up wearer data like heartbeat, body temperature, or even how much you're perspiring when you hit the gym.


How the sensor intends to do that, however, isn't explicitly outlined in the filing. AsAppleInsider first pointed out, U.S. patent #8,655,004 concerns a "sports monitoring system for headphones, earbuds and/or headsets" to be used "during exercise or sporting activities." Originally filed in 2007, the patent suggests Apple has apparently been experimenting with new ways to cull together biometric data for quite some time now.


more at http://www.fastcompany.com/3026567/tech-forecast/apple-patents-fitness-tracking-earbuds-that-can-read-your-heartbeat


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