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How can health tech get beyond early adopters to reduce care disparities among the masses?

How can health tech get beyond early adopters to reduce care disparities among the masses? | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it
Health tech entrepreneurs and a report released this week look at ways to bridge knowledge and behavior gaps in health technology.

Via Alex Butler
Murray McKercher's insight:

Good report...

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Sven Awege's curator insight, February 25, 2013 1:17 AM

Social media and HIT combined can bring the behavioral changes, but as usual it will take time, more time than the pioneers expect.

The good thing is that it will definately happen, and will democratise health along the way.... slowly!

Alex Butler's comment, February 25, 2013 11:08 AM
I agree it will take time Sven, the interesting thing for me is that we have moved so quickly already. In a short space of time we have gone through the the democratization of information, into the even more powerful connectivity to each other and are coming out of the other side looking at big data and artificial intelligence shaping personal health management on a scale unimaginable 15 years ago. Technology becomes revolutionary though when it is no longer exciting but mundane and ubiquitous.
Denise Silber's curator insight, February 26, 2013 3:29 PM

This is the fundamental question

 
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Rescooped by Murray McKercher from Office Environments Of The Future
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The inflatable, antibacterial BUILDING

The inflatable, antibacterial BUILDING | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it
The ‘Bubble Building’, proposed for Shanghai, could be created using inflatable antibacterial nylon sheets that are placed in front of the exterior of an ordinary office.

Via Color-Art
Murray McKercher's insight:

Interesting applications for field hospitals for emergency first responder deployment

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Keeping healthy would be more fun with addictive mobile games

Keeping healthy would be more fun with addictive mobile games | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it

Blue Goji, the latest startup from serial entrepreneurs Kai and Charles Huang, posits that fitness would be more fun if addictive mobile games were layered on top of cardio workouts. Starting today, the company will learn just how many exercisers feel the same.

MyFitnessPal, the eight-year-old diet-and-exercise community, has partnered with Blue Goji for a “limited launch” that will give its users special benefits for being early adopters.


Via Alex Butler
Murray McKercher's insight:

Healthy Addictive Mobile Games?

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Healthy Connections: Technology Promoting Family Health - The Herald | HeraldOnline.com

Healthy Connections: Technology Promoting Family Health - The Herald | HeraldOnline.com | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it
Healthy Connections: Technology Promoting Family Health The Herald | HeraldOnline.com "This is a unique opportunity for Pro Mujer to partner with these prominent organizations in health and education and create a technology platform which has the...
Murray McKercher's insight:

This came to my attention this morning. A truly global initiative. How can we expand this to Africa? Ideas?

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A Map of the Entire Internet, 1977

A Map of the Entire Internet, 1977 | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it
Once upon a time, you could draw a map of the known Internet. Here's what the world of networked computers looked like in 1977 when ARPANET was still just a huge government-funded science project.

Via Alex Butler
Murray McKercher's insight:

What does the Interent have in common with the human neural networks? and how do we connect the two?

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How Salesforce And Deloitte Tackle Employee Engagement With Gamification

How Salesforce And Deloitte Tackle Employee Engagement With Gamification | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it
IWith less than 30 percent of workers today committed to and satisfied with their work, leaders need to find ways to change their employees’ attitudes and habits. Gamification can help.

Via Alex Butler
Murray McKercher's insight:

Gamification of work...great idea

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gillkelley's curator insight, July 4, 2013 1:43 AM

I love gamification as a concept.  It may not work woth all personalities, but as a motivator to drive the speed of moving through a leadership learning programme - great!

Pierrick Fischer's comment, July 4, 2013 7:09 AM
Gamification is super smart! When you realize how unhappy most people are with their jobs, you also realize the oustanding potential for improvement that you have as a manager! Looking forward to trying some of these techniques!
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s curator insight, July 5, 2013 8:09 PM

So what steps do you need to get identify the type of games?  These tips from the article will help: 

For each employee, figure out what behaviors have the most impact.Make sure those employees know what is expected and have the tools, resources and support required to do what they need to do.Recognize and reward behavioral steps along the way as well as end results.
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Will real-life AI gaming be bigger than MMO's?

The amazing AI-demo of Anki at WWDC.


Via Guillaume Decugis
Murray McKercher's insight:

Yes...

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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, June 21, 2013 1:15 PM

If you missed Apple's WWDC keynote, you should watch this. A company called Anki is taking AI not only to the next level but also to the real world. Their first product due this fall is a car-racing game where you fight AI-controlled cars on a real track.


This is fascinating to me because the big recent trend in gaming has been to downplay the importance of AI by bringing human players to play with or against one another. We also talk a lot about real-life gaming (humans with humans in the street) but I don't know if this will be that massive (still waiting to see Ingress get big). Now this is the missing combination: after human + AI, human + human online, human + human real-life, real-life + AI.


Too early to tell but great to see the gaming industry has perspective beyond reinventing the nth iteration of a point and shoot.

GamerPeer's curator insight, June 23, 2013 12:57 PM

Next gen gaming is reintroduced to the living room.  My initial reaction is - when do the tournaments begin?  The combination of gameing and real objects is #gamification at it's finest.  

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If media is being disrupted like the car industry, then who is the Tesla Motors of media?

If media is being disrupted like the car industry, then who is the Tesla Motors of media? | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it

In an earlier post for paidContent, I looked at the broad similarities between the automotive-manufacturing industry and the media business — specifically newspapers — and how disruption has affected both in some fairly similar ways.


Via Guillaume Decugis
Murray McKercher's insight:

The Tesla of the Media Industry...a great thought...

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M. Edward (Ed) Borasky's comment, June 4, 2013 6:07 PM
More interesting question is "Is Tesla the Tucker of 2013?"
Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, June 7, 2013 8:09 PM
This post is related to your post about should social networks curate their own content. A: No and They Can't. The fire hose is too large, the speed of content development too fast and the old "editorial" stance too dead to play gatekeeper. There won't be any rekindling of the "mother may I past'. All "programed" content is becoming free form and WE are the schedulers, curators, and,l thanks to tools like Scoopit, capable of curating our own lives thank you very much :).
Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, June 7, 2013 8:35 PM

Entropy Is Our Content Marketing Future
Guilluame Decugis has some great insights. I wrote about how disruptive platforms were to "websites" and by extension any other for of information aggregation several years ago (platforms vs. websites http://scenttrail.blogspot.com/2011/09/internet-marketing-platforms-vs.html ).

Now I think platforms are in danger. Platforms aggregate User Generated Content. That aggregation creates a virtual cycle - the bigger it gets the bigger it gets and faster and faster.

Entropy is what will undo even the most stalwart platform. When I wrote How Entropy Is Creating Web 3.0 Right Under Our Noses (http://scenttrail.blogspot.com/2012/11/how-entropy-is-creating-web-30-right.html ) I wanted to share a LESS defined and more TAGGED future.

Look at the Huffington Post. As they push the boundaries of content co-opting more and more writers into their fold they also begin to untangle their own web. As any platform reaches some "point of diminishing returns" point it must begin to eat itself.

Once any website is HUGE becoming that much more dominant doesn't make financial sense. Sure there are virtual cycle rewards. The compound interest of the web is LINKS and the bigger you are the easier links are to accrue.

As any content play becomes HUGE its ability to create a relevant relationship with any new or existing customer is under greater stress. The Huffington Post can keep adding writers but then you are just reading my blog with their masthead (makes no sense and adds no value).

Our old friend entropy says Huffington is about to regress to some lesser mean In fact, I think the creation of mega-platforms as a concept (despite my love for it up until TODAY lol) is over.

Let's call our emerging "lean content" trend rich mobile snippets with gamification. By mashing up what is already out there in the water tomorrow's hubs will curate in multiple dimensions: writers, keyword density and rich tagged snippets. All of this curating will create more free-formed "mesh-like" structures (to quote Lisa Gansky).

What is the difference between a mesh and a platform? Platforms aggregate UGC, curation and content creation to a PLACE. Meshes are less proprietary. Meshes will trap anything from anywhere based on the algorithms used.

Being content agnostic but tag specific is a Google-ization of content, a flexible keyword and behavioral (who cares about what content and why) mesh more responsive, open and flexible than even the most aggressive and currently dominant hub (like the Huffington Post).

The future will be as hard on the Huffington Post as it has been on the New York Times. As an aggregator Huffington may have more pivot capacity than their print cousins, but no one ever expects the Spanish Inquisition :).

 

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How Virtual Health Assistants Can Reshape Healthcare

How Virtual Health Assistants Can Reshape Healthcare | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it
Guest post written by Thomas Morrow Thomas Morrow, M.D., has 25 years experience across the healthcare industry. He currently serves as an unpaid advisor to Next IT, and a medical director at Genentech.

Via Alex Butler
Murray McKercher's insight:

Interesting read...

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Jim Murphy's curator insight, March 13, 2013 6:06 AM

#@patientservices supporting the activated patient / provider not just doctor  relationship

Linda Lia's curator insight, March 14, 2013 5:19 AM

Via Alex Butler

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Cancer research to be aided by smartphone game developed at hackathon (Wired UK)

Cancer research to be aided by smartphone game developed at hackathon (Wired UK) | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it
Facebook, Google and Amazon Web Services developers are joining academics for a hackathon that will see genetic data transformed into a citizen science mobile game

Via Alex Butler
Murray McKercher's insight:

This is an amazing effort..You can track the progress of the game jam by following the hackers at #CRUKgame

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How can health tech get beyond early adopters to reduce care disparities among the masses?

How can health tech get beyond early adopters to reduce care disparities among the masses? | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it
Health tech entrepreneurs and a report released this week look at ways to bridge knowledge and behavior gaps in health technology.

Via Alex Butler
Murray McKercher's insight:

Good report...

more...
Sven Awege's curator insight, February 25, 2013 1:17 AM

Social media and HIT combined can bring the behavioral changes, but as usual it will take time, more time than the pioneers expect.

The good thing is that it will definately happen, and will democratise health along the way.... slowly!

Alex Butler's comment, February 25, 2013 11:08 AM
I agree it will take time Sven, the interesting thing for me is that we have moved so quickly already. In a short space of time we have gone through the the democratization of information, into the even more powerful connectivity to each other and are coming out of the other side looking at big data and artificial intelligence shaping personal health management on a scale unimaginable 15 years ago. Technology becomes revolutionary though when it is no longer exciting but mundane and ubiquitous.
Denise Silber's curator insight, February 26, 2013 3:29 PM

This is the fundamental question

 
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ComScore: Facebook Is Now the Most Used Smartphone App in US

ComScore: Facebook Is Now the Most Used Smartphone App in US | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it
Facebook passed Google Maps to become the most used smartphone app at the end of 2012, according to new data from comScore.

Via Alex Butler
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Apps are too much like 1990's CD-ROMs and not enough like the Web - Scott Hanselman

Apps are too much like 1990's CD-ROMs and not enough like the Web - Scott Hanselman | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it

"I'm starting to resent Apps like I resented CD-ROMs."Writes Scott Hanselman on his blog on Programming, User Experience, The Zen of Computers and Life in General


Via Guillaume Decugis
Murray McKercher's insight:

"Go Somewhere and get functionality as opposed to Bring Something To Me to get functionality" Agreed, this is an interesting look back at the recent past that speaks to the current issues in mobile Application Development..Native Mobile Apps versus Web-based Mobile Apps...going way back in the early mobile internet days we argued aboutthe "walled garden" approach that operator's were using to try and "contain" a subscriber community within their - the operator's - ecosystem..

 

People do not like to be constrained in a "walled garden" approach...

 

Murray

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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, February 15, 2013 9:03 AM

This post dates back to 2011 but it explains with great clarity the limitations of Apps as a platform. And the ongoing tensions between native Appsand Web Apps that I already addressed here. Interesting read. 

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Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram – How Big Is Social Media Around The World?

Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram – How Big Is Social Media Around The World? | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it

Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram – How Big Is Social Media Around The World?


Via myriam, ABroaderView, donhornsby, juandoming, Terheck, Jimun Gimm
Murray McKercher's insight:

In the healthcare context..social media is obviously a big deal..people love to discuss health issues - however, personal health data must be protected if the conversation becomes clinical and sensitive...IMHO...murray

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Angela Watkins's comment, February 8, 2013 7:47 AM
By the click of a mouse .. around the world
Angela Watkins's comment, February 8, 2013 7:47 AM
By the click of a mouse .. around the world
Angela Watkins's curator insight, February 8, 2013 7:49 AM

By the click of the mouse .. you can go around the world.

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Your doctor is going digital: What the rise of medtech means for you

Your doctor is going digital: What the rise of medtech means for you | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it
Five years into the future, doctors will be empowered with a wide array of exponential technologies and will become the most efficient they have ever been. Physicians or artificial intelligence systems will have the ability to know your health status, perhaps even before you do, thanks to the combination of three important factors: artificial intelligence, electronic medical records/digital medicine and sensor technology.

Via Alex Butler
Murray McKercher's insight:

I am facinated by how technology will improve healthcare. More,  and better information can always help in diagnosis and health care delivery. I am looking forward to Hacking Health Connect in Toronto...

http://www.hackinghealth.ca/

 

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eMedToday's curator insight, October 11, 2013 5:24 PM

IBM Watson finished medical school in one week, WOW

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Photography Inspiration | These photos are so good that I hate every photographer who shot them!

Photography Inspiration | These photos are so good that I hate every photographer who shot them! | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it

Pinterest-based photos that inspire!


Via Mark Strozier
Murray McKercher's insight:

I am aware  this has nothing specfifc to do with Healthcare, but inspiration can come from art, anytime, anyhwere...

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Mark Strozier's curator insight, October 4, 2013 5:07 PM

Seeing great photography, I mean off-the-chart great photographs makes want to kick myself for not shooting every day! Something I noticed is there is a LOT of exciting experimental photographs in this collection. Some techniques I recognized. Some I can figure out, maybe. Others shots simply blow.Me. Away!


Not a whole lot of Pshop'ng, go figure.

Sara Lamothe's curator insight, October 13, 2013 9:41 AM

Some really great shots!

John A. Papa's curator insight, November 15, 2013 10:21 AM

A bunch of people went through a lot of trouble to pin all these great portraits, but all you have to do is click once to see them.. enjoy

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Finally, FDA tells mobile health app developers what it plans to regulate

Finally, FDA tells mobile health app developers what it plans to regulate | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it
After more than two years of waiting, mobile health app developers are finally getting some clarity from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on what it plans to regulate.

Via Alex Butler
Murray McKercher's insight:

This will help accelerate the applications already in the pipeline...

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Helene Wild's curator insight, September 25, 2013 5:15 AM

finally some quality control for consumers

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9 ways a billion dollar new mobile company might be created

We’ve been in “New Mobile” – a world of wireless broadband and mobile OS platforms enabling great end user experiences – for about 5 years. The improvement in the capabilities of devices has been astonishing. But in truth we are still in the first inning of New Mobile reshaping just about everything we do and everywhere we do it.


Via Guillaume Decugis
Murray McKercher's insight:

In the Healthcare community, information and new communications technology are changing the idea of where care is deliverd...

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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, July 18, 2013 6:00 PM
Great points out of which the idea of "tablet first" companies is very compelling.
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Why Content Curation and Crowdsourcing Will Change Everything

Why Content Curation and Crowdsourcing Will Change Everything | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it

ndeed times are changinf...

From the original article by Tom George on his "Internet Billboards".
Here are some interesting excerpts from the post about content curation.
"After having spent the better part of four years curating content from renowned bloggers, journalists and authors as well as building a platform here on Internet Billboards, which has evolved into a wonderful community of content curator’s.

Here is my definition of content curation. A content curator is someone who finds, organizes, presents and shares valuable information (content) in many forms, on a specific topic, in a way that provides special context and or a unique engagement with his or her readers. In actuality when done correctly, over time it positions the curator as an expert in his or her respective field and defines their reputation as a thought leader.

A good curator will mix curation with his or her own original content, to give interpretations for the express purpose of allowing others to form their own conclusions.
...
Why curation and crowdsourcing will and should become more important to you. I will give you ten reasons.
1. There is just too much content;
2. Social Sites Are Full Of Spam;
3. Privacy concerns with big data;
4. Limiting risk and using many minds;
5. Technology must assist us and help us not hinder us;
6. People Will recognize the need to build meaningful relationships;
7. Information will flow freely;
8. Trust and authority will be the new currency;
9. Curation helps you establish relationships with thought leaders;
10. Crowd Sourcing can make things possible..."

The article is discussed with more information. Read full original post here:
http://www.internetbillboards.net/2013/06/why-content-curation-and-crowdsourcing-will-change-everything/

 


Via Giuseppe Mauriello
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Paul Moss - teacher, learner's curator insight, August 8, 2013 3:03 PM

There is a glaring omission from the benefits list of crowd sourcing and content curation in terms of pedagogical value - please add in: it increases the possibility of constructivist learning.

John Thomas's curator insight, February 12, 9:42 AM

How to Use Twitter to Become an Expert on Any Topic

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This is the most popular post you’ll read all day.

This is the most popular post you’ll read all day. | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it

In a recent post for The Atlantic, Derek Thompson investigates what drives people to read content online. As a writer for a popular news site, it’s of interest to Thompson to find out what people are clicking on and why when navigating through the endless amount of web content available. Though it sounds like a boring study of analytics at first, his findings and references are actually super interesting.


Via Guillaume Decugis
Murray McKercher's insight:

This is very interesting...

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Steven Mallach's curator insight, July 4, 2013 8:30 PM

Investigating how the consumer interacted with traditional media and how the social media differs is one of the most fascinating studies for marketing and communications fold to undertake.

 

Some (myself included) would argue that very little has changed since the newspaper was King of the Hill. The same rules to engaging with carefully selected demographics apply, the same headline rules, the same intro paragraphy rules.

 

Grabd the reader's attention and make sure they stick.

 

The difference is the social media channels go far beyond simple print in sharability, targeting can be much more precise and engagement is taken to a whole new MEASURABLE level.

 

So, everything changes, but everything stays the same.

Neil Ferree's comment, August 12, 2013 8:39 AM
Link bait is one way and Listly lists and votes and polls is another way both is better
Ariane Bourgeois's comment, August 12, 2013 9:05 PM
Thanks for your comment, @Neil :)
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Stephen Hawking’s advice for twenty-first century grads: Embrace complexity

 A few years ago, Hawking was asked what he thought of the common opinion that the twentieth century was that of biology and the twenty-first century would be that of physics. Hawking replied that in his opinion the twenty-first century would be the “century of complexity”. That remark probably holds more useful advice for contemporary students than they realize since it points to at least two skills which are going to be essential for new college grads in the age of complexity: statistics and data visualization.


Via Complexity Digest, Ashish Umre
Murray McKercher's insight:

"century of complexity" sounds like we should therefore concentrate on simplicity in all things mobile...

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Harshal Hayatnagarkar's curator insight, April 25, 2013 11:17 AM
Exactly, Sir !
Dmitry Alexeev's curator insight, April 29, 2013 4:15 AM

Complexity is us)

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Designing for health tech? Remember the 7 deadly sins

Designing for health tech? Remember the 7 deadly sins | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it
Public health has long focused on awareness and attitude in promoting behavior change. But health behavior experts and others say that’s not enough — you need to trigger emotion.

Via Alex Butler
Murray McKercher's insight:

Emotion is an amazing neuroprocess...by understanding the link between emotions and the physical body one can speed most any healing processes. Negative emotion = negative consequences...+ve emotion = +ve consequences...

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Forrester's top 10 trends for mobile in 2013

Forrester's top 10 trends for mobile in 2013 | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it

Mobile phones are already well on their way to replacing cameras, cash, maps, remote controls, handheld gaming systems, boarding passes, tickets, cash registers, calculators, notepads, and much more. And they’re becoming globally ubiquitous: 1.6 billion phones were shipped last year; and by the end of this year, 1.4 billion smartphones will be in use.

So the question is not so much what smartphones can do, it’s what can’t they do. And the strategic imperative for organizations is to understand how they are going to meet the challenge of that change.

A week after sharing its vision of the top 15 emerging technologies, Forrester shared its view of the near future of mobile in analyst Thomas Husson’s report, released today.

Here are the top 10 implications for mobile, according to Husson:

 


Via Alex Butler
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Neil Wilkins's curator insight, February 15, 2013 9:33 AM

Have you seen evidence for this yourself?

lauryn burkhalter's curator insight, February 20, 2013 1:46 PM

This is a challenge and an opportunity for organizations globally. However, there are still people who are not able to afford these seemingly ubiquitous tools. How can we provide the world with equal access to information?

 

Do people deserve the right to access? or is this something that they should own?

Alex Butler's comment, February 21, 2013 6:48 AM
This is a good point, however access is complex and we cannot make assumptions. For example NHS Direct data in the UK suggests that those most accessing health information from a smartphone device were actually from the lower socio economic groups with the phone the families only access to the internet. So we need to be cautious when dismissing groups of people from the mobile equation :-)
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I used Google Glass: the future, with monthly updates

I used Google Glass: the future, with monthly updates | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it

Up close and personal with Google's visionary new computer - by Joshua Topolsky on The Verge.

 
Via Guillaume Decugis
Murray McKercher's insight:

Take a look through Google Glass from the perspective of a healthcare worker...

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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, February 22, 2013 2:09 PM

Watch the video to et a better sense of how Google Glass works.

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Self-Portraits: Smartphones Reveal a Side Bias in Non-Artists

Self-Portraits: Smartphones Reveal a Side Bias in Non-Artists | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it

According to surveys of art books and exhibitions, artists prefer poses showing the left side of the face when composing a portrait and the right side when composing a self-portrait. However, it is presently not known whether similar biases can be observed in individuals that lack formal artistic training. We collected self-portraits by naïve photographers who used the iPhone™ front camera, and confirmed a right side bias in this non-artist sample and even when biomechanical constraints would have favored the opposite. This result undermines explanations based on posing conventions due to artistic training or biomechanical factors, and is consistent with the hypothesis that side biases in portraiture and self-portraiture are caused by biologically- determined asymmetries in facial expressiveness.


Via Ashish Umre
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Watson now officially fighting cancer, from the cloud

Watson now officially fighting cancer, from the cloud | Healthcare Technology | Scoop.it
IBM is turning Watson loose on lung cancer, offering up a cloud-based service designed to let doctors from around the country find the best-possible treatments for their patients.

Via Alex Butler
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Brian Shields's curator insight, February 9, 2013 9:07 AM

Very exciting to see the leaders in tech partner with the leaders in cancer care.  I believe the next revolution in medicine will be driven by technology and the front line health care and research institutes.


Aggregating and utilizing data intelligently will help clinicians and reseachers better provide care to the community.  The lines between research trials and the standards of care may gradually blur as new technology driven treatment strategies emerge.