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Healthcare Social Media News
Top stories related to social media implementations in healthcare
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Social media for patients, platform by platform: a visual guide

Social media for patients, platform by platform: a visual guide | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Originally posted on Health Care Social Media Monitor:
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Jennings, Hive Strategies & CareHubs Launch Online Community Partnership

Jennings, Hive Strategies & CareHubs Launch Online Community Partnership | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
A decade ago, Jennings (my company) developed its first online patient support community – NCCancerStories.org – a virtual gathering place where patients and prospective patients could connect and share their experiences.
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24 Outstanding Statistics on How Social Media has Impacted Health Care

24 Outstanding Statistics on How Social Media has Impacted Health Care | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Communication has been disrupted through social media but how has the health care industry faired? Dive into an analysis of 24 statistics on the subject.
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ePharma Summit: Health Care Pros Staying Informed Through Social, No Matter How Skeptical

ePharma Summit: Health Care Pros Staying Informed Through Social, No Matter How Skeptical | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Health Care Pros Staying Informed Through Social, No Matter How... http://t.co/ihfB73B77y
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How Cleveland Clinic Builds Brand Recognition via Multichannel Marketing

How Cleveland Clinic Builds Brand Recognition via Multichannel Marketing | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
In today’s podcast, Stewart Gandolf and Paul Matsen discuss how the world-renowned Cleveland Clinic has successfully built a widely recognized and trusted brand…without a dependence on traditional or large media advertising budget.read more...
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Instagram for Doctors: Dangers of Social Media in Healthcare

Instagram for Doctors: Dangers of Social Media in Healthcare | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it

 

Ever wonder what your doctors and nurses talk about at the water cooler? Well, grab a paper cup and some Emetrol, because a new app is transporting medical chatter from hospital hallways to mobile devices.

Nicknamed Instagram for doctors, Figure 1 is a new social media outlet that allows users to upload photos of patients’ symptoms and maladies in order to ask for diagnoses, glean some advice or simply provide amusement to their peers.

Immediately after logging on – anyone can sign up – I was reviewing the x-ray of a 90-year-old female with a grotesque radial fracture. Scrolling down started a parade of stubbed toes, extracted tumors and rashes galore – enough to make me regret downloading the app over lunch. But as I kept scrolling (and cringing), my communicator instincts started to develop a nervous twitch. The word “HIPAA” began echoing in my head. Were these patients comfortable being photographed and discussed publicly? Did they even know? And what are the implications of a doctor following care recommendations he received from a stranger on a social media site?

The explanation from app creator Josh Landy, as told to Vox.com, is hardly comforting: “These are people who are talking about a lot of the cases because they’re interesting, textbook, classic versions and they can help.”

To be clear, there are doctors using the app for productive reasons. There are also users like the one who posted a photo of a sutured hand with the caption, “Anyone want to guess what happened here?” Others have taken to posting gruesome photos of traumatic amputations and the like.

Regardless of the user’s intent, it’s only a matter of time before a patient’s identity is exposed on Figure 1. For communicators, an ounce of prevention can go a long way in deterring a privacy breach. Start by educating employees on:

Your organization’s social media policy. Most pitfalls lie in the gray areas. Be specific.HIPAA laws. Make sure health workers understand the basics of HIPAA and their roles in upholding it. Encourage them to ask questions.The “rules” of posting online. Whether they want to or not, employees represent their employers on social media. Instill the mentality that nothing is private, nothing can be deleted, and everything could end up on the front page of the paper.

Ill-advised social media posts (not to mention covert photography) have wrought the downfall of many. It’s never been more important to stay vigilant of what employees are posting and where. Otherwise, one unwise post could lead to one “interesting, textbook, classic version” of a HIPAA violation for your organization.


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Social media: a transformative force in healthcare

The slides from the workshop that Mary Freer - @FreerMary and Helen Bevan - @HelenBevan presented on the power and potential of social media to support transfo… (Slides from "social media: a transformative force in healthcare" by @FreerMary & ...
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How to Help Patients Find Your Medical Practice Easily Online

How to Help Patients Find Your Medical Practice Easily Online | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
The web is the place the majority of consumers turn to when searching for a new doctor.
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Social Media Rules: The FDA Crackdown

Social Media Rules: The FDA Crackdown | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Are the rules regulating social media advertising in the pharmaceutical industry fair?
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Health care can learn from Southwest Airlines

Health care can learn from Southwest Airlines | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
What does an airline and your health care organization have in common? Plenty, if you're paying attention to online feedback and comments.

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C. Todd Livengood's curator insight, September 4, 2014 12:44 PM

"It's really about listening to all of our different audiences and using feedback to make smarter decisions to enhance the customer experience." Ashley Pettit, Southwest Airlines' social business advisor 

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Technology in Academic Medicine: Integrating Digital Literacy into Medical Education

Technology in Academic Medicine: Integrating Digital Literacy into Medical Education | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it

As social media plays an increasingly important role in health care delivery, a growing number of medical educators are helping future physicians develop what they call digital literacy and digital professionalism.

Bertalan Meskó, M.D., Ph.D., a medical futurist who travels the world consulting and lecturing on digital literacy in health care, frames digital literacy as “the way that medical professionals can use digital devices as well as online solutions in communication with patients and their peers.” Meskó believes that “today’s medical professionals must be masters of different skills that are related to using digital devices or online solutions” and argues that mastering those skills “is now a crucial skill set that all medical professionals require.”

Bryan S. Vartabedian, M.D., an assistant professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine, suggests that because digital tools have become so pervasive in medicine, medical schools have an obligation to help medical students learn how to be smart about them and to apply professional standards in their use. The rise of social media and networked communications means that “physicians now have to learn to manage and maintain their identity in the public space,” Vartabedian said.

“This is brand new. For the better part of modern civilization, physicians only had to worry about their image during a 15-minute encounter with the patient,” Vartabedian said. “Now, the democratization of media has made every physician an independent publisher. That brings a whole new set of responsibilities for which physicians need to be trained. Under what context do we discuss certain items? How do we manage our online identity? What can we do and what should we not do with smartphones?”

While digital literacy is not yet part of the core curricula in medical schools, it is beginning to appear more regularly and more formally as extracurricular learning.

At the University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine (UC Irvine), for example, medical students can take the elective Health 2.0 + Digital Literacy. Designed to fill gap in student understanding about emerging trends in health care technology and social media, the course focuses on such topics as how to manage requirements for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), data security, health record protection, and the emerging importance that digital tools have in patient-centered health care.

The school periodically offers short training sessions on digital literacy. “We catch students at their first-, second-, and third-year orientations and again before they graduate,” said Warren Wiechmann, M.D., M.B.A., associate dean of instructional technologies at the school. “We talk about the basics of social media and professionalism, and also cover newly emerging technologies like Google Glass and 3-D printing. We’ve also put on a session about how to curate content on the Web.”

In addition, he said, the school offers workshops on what qualifies as a good website or smartphone app. Other sessions look more broadly at topics in health information technology, including the business of technology and how the startup market works.

At Baylor, Vartabedian developed a course called Digital Smarts, which helps medical students develop a professional, safe, and intentional strategy for their interactions with social media. Like UC Irvine, Baylor takes a longitudinal approach.

“Digital Smarts aims to prepare our students for the realities of the digital age,” Vartabedian said. “We effectively touch our students at three or four points over the course of three or four years. At orientation, we cover very broad issues about students’ online identity and topics like the permanence of digital messaging. When they hit 18 months, right before they go to the ward, we talk about more specific clinical scenarios they will face, such as what you should and shouldn’t do when communicating with patients on platforms like Twitter.” For fourth-year students, the focus switches to such topics as how students can build a digital footprint and how they can present themselves online as they advance into residency and start to groom themselves for new jobs.

Under the aegis of the AAMC Group on Information Resources, Vartabedian and Wiechmann collaborated with Katherine Chretien, M.D., an associate professor of medicine at the George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences, and Neil Mehta, M.D., an associate professor of medicine at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University, to develop a digital literacy toolkit for educators and learners. Available online through the AAMC, the toolkit includes case studies and guidelines on the use of social media, educator notes, and other resources.

“The concept behind the toolkit was to put together a set of materials that any faculty member, from the most junior faculty member to a dean, can use to host a meaningful discussion about social media, digital literacy, and digital professionalism,” Wiechmann said. “You don’t need to have an expert on campus or in a program to be able to have these discussions.”

Vartabedian said that because social media “now represents the modern means of both sharing information and communicating,” tomorrow’s physicians need specific training that can help them be professional in their use of digital tools. “The public presence of the physician is something that needs to be taken very seriously,” he said. “I might even go further to suggest that medical schools have a civic if not a moral obligation to be preparing our students for how to maintain themselves in the public space. Medical schools have a responsibility to help students understand where the limits are.”

 


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The Hospital CEO Investing In Social Media

The Hospital CEO Investing In Social Media | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Dr. Stephen Klasko, the CEO and President of Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals in Philadelphia, PA is investing his time in the use of social media to communicate to his audiences.
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What's News in Healthcare Social Media - Sept 3 2014

I'm so excited to reunite with +Chad Hermann for this Sept 3 hangout on air! Chad is the Communications Director for Kids Plus Pediatrics and one of my earliest social media treasures! Chad...
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The Doctor Will Skype You Now: Changing How We Go to the Doctor

In an era of notorious breaches, hacks and fraud, protecting patient information within telemedicine needs to begin at the outset, while the programs are still in development.
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Top 10 Tips for Social Media Success in Healthcare

Top 10 Tips for Social Media Success in Healthcare | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Ten can't-miss tips for healthcare b-to-b marketers working to build a brand presence on social.
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10 statistics on nurses' use of social media

10 statistics on nurses' use of social media | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Most nurses use social media to follow healthcare issues and topics — just not at work, according to a new survey from Lippincott Solutions.
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Top 10 Children’s Hospitals on Facebook

Top 10 Children’s Hospitals on Facebook | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Ranking the Facebook pages of the top 10 children’s hospitals in the United States by calculating a comprehensive score based on several performance categories.
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Top 5 Reasons Social Media Empowers Health Care Providers - Healthcare Global

Top 5 Reasons Social Media Empowers Health Care Providers - Healthcare Global | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Healthcare Global Top 5 Reasons Social Media Empowers Health Care Providers Healthcare Global As the connection between healthcare and social media continues to tighten, here are five reasons healthcare professionals should use social media to...
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How Hospitals Can Leverage the Rise of Google Plus [PODCAST]

How Hospitals Can Leverage the Rise of Google Plus [PODCAST] | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Google Plus is standing toe-to-to with Facebook, but—as Tom Jensen and Lonnie Hirsch discuss in today’s podcast—Google Plus is closing the competitive gap, and it’s a hospital marketing tool that can boost organic search results.
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Social Media In The Medical Industry

Social Media In The Medical Industry | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
I may not be a doctor, but I certainly understand their perspective when it comes to marketing, so for my very first LinkedIn article, I couldn't think of anything better for me to talk about. Most (Great post Lacey.
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Shrinking Globe: Global Health and Social Media

Discussion of how social media can be used to enhance global health.

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Art Jones's curator insight, September 6, 2014 10:22 AM

Twitter is being used the way Ham Radio was used in the middle of the last century, although Ham Radio never achieved the massive base of active users that Twitter has today.

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The History and Power of Hashtags in Social Media Marketing (Infographic)

The History and Power of Hashtags in Social Media Marketing (Infographic) | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
For decades the hashtag symbol was more commonly referred to as the pound sign (while others see it as the all-too-familiar crisscrossing lines used to play tic-tac-toe). In recent years, this seemin…

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Disseminating Medical Knowledge in the Facebook Era

Disseminating Medical Knowledge in the Facebook Era | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it

 

In the medical field, where local practice patterns have historically been driven by local standards, how might web-based connectivity change the ways in which physicians will practice in the near future?

In the spring of 2012, a short video profiling atrocities committed by a guerrilla leader named Joseph Kony was viewed by over 50 million people in less than three days. The rapidity with which that video spread was a testament to the power of digital networks and the unprecedented speed and scope with which information can move in the information age. Yet in medicine, arguably the most technologically advanced of the professional fields, our ability to spread information is stunningly slow and ineffective. The promulgation (or lack thereof) of evidence-based guidelines is a particularly blatant example. In a 2011 analysis of physician adherence to dyslipidemia prevention guidelines, only 36.9 percent were appropriately performing lipid profile screening, 27.6 percent were performing pharmacotherapy up-titration, and 21.0 percent pharmacotherapy initiation (Vashitz G, Meyer J, Parmet Y, Henkin Y, Peleg R, Gilutz H. Physician adherence to the dyslipidemia guidelines is as challenging an issue as patient adherence. Fam Pract 2011; 28: 524-31). Most surprising is that this poor performance is occurring nearly 10 years after the ATP III guidelines were published!

There have been many efforts to explain the ineffective dissemination of knowledge in medicine and in particular the failure to implement of evidence-based guidelines. A central tenet of this work is the belief that physicians are deeply affected and influenced by the peer group with whom they work. One of the earliest examples was the landmark study of physician-prescribing behavior by Coleman, Katz and Mentzel (Coleman J KE, Mentzel H. The diffusion of an innovation among physicians. Sociometry 1957; 20: 253-70) that demonstrated how relationships between physicians can predict the adoption of a new medication. Specifically, the adoption pattern begins with key opinion leaders, spreads to community physicians who have contact with those leaders, and then to physicians with social ties. Numerous studies, including those of Browman (Browman GP, Levine MN, Mohide EA, Hayward RS, Pritchard KI, Gafni A, et al. The practice guidelines development cycle: a conceptual tool for practice guidelines development and implementation. J Clin Oncol 1995; 13: 502-12), Parchman (Parchman ML, Scoglio CM, Schumm P. Understanding the implementation of evidence-based care: A structural network approach.Implement Sci 2011; 6: 14), and Wennberg (Wennberg JE. Unwarranted variations in healthcare delivery: implications for academic medical centres. BMJ 2002; 325: 961-4) have reinforced the importance of peer networks even in this era of electronic health records and digital communication.

That physicians are influenced by thought-leaders and peer practitioners is not surprising. This model is reinforced by the current training and practice paradigm that emphasizes the knowledge of thought-leaders and the practice habits of local communities. However, we are on the verge of a new era in healthcare with the emergence of healthcare-specific social and professional networks such as Doximity, Sermo, Healthtap, and DocBookMD. In creating a national community that leverages the inherent strengths of online social/professional networking, these networks have the potential to change the way that physicians interact and may disrupt the current communication paradigm.

We have partnered with Doximity, a private professional physician network, to take an early look at how peer-to-peer relationships are forming online. Generally speaking, our observations suggest that a physician’s online social/professional network differs across specialties both in the makeup of the network and geography of relationships. Even though these online communities are just beginning to develop, early trends suggest a shift away from locally based relationships that have heretofore driven dissemination of knowledge and best practices.

Doximity has over 130,000 United States verified physicians (over 20 percent of the U.S. physician workforce) as registered members (Bureau of Labor Statistics. Occupational Outlook Handbook: Physicians and Surgeons; 2012-2013). Doximity members are early adopters of peer-to-peer social networking. Rates of participation in Doximity vary by specialty from about 0.5 percent to 11 percent of members of a given specialty. There are notable differences in the size and make-up of individual's networks, depending on specialty. Generalists (Pediatrics, Family Medicine, and General Internal Medicine physicians) have greater proportion of connections with other generalists. Sub-specialtists such as Plastic Surgery, Thoracic Surgery, Endocrinology, Radiation Oncology, and Oncology have significantly fewer connections within their specialty, and in turn tend to be more connected with generalists. This trend may reflect typical referral patterns but could also be influenced by the higher rates of membership of generalists within Doximity. However, we observed less geographic preference than expected within the Doximity physician network. Individuals were relatively equal in their “local” (within 50 miles) and “non-local” (outside 50 miles) colleagues. This trend appears across both generalists and specialists, suggesting that online networks are not merely a reflection of local referral patterns.

In the medical field, where local practice patterns have historically been driven by local standards, how might web-based connectivity change the ways in which physicians will practice in the near future?

 

These early observations reflect how the Facebook era is changing the relationship networks of physicians across the country. In a field where practice patterns have been based on local standards, we can hypothesize how these new, Web-based networks will allow innovation and information to propagate differently among physicians as a result of the differences in the structure of their professional networks. Generalists such as pediatricians, internists, etc. have more colleagues from the same specialty that can introduce and reinforce changes in practice. They act as “connectors” in what can be thought of as a “clustered network.” Specialists seem to demonstrate more of a “long ties” network structure with far fewer immediate colleagues to influence and be influenced by. Changing behaviors using “opinion leaders” might work well for generalists—two or three adopters in a highly connected, clustered network may be enough to seed and rapidly disseminate an idea or behavior. But for specialists, a different approach that leverages their “long ties” might be more effective.

As a field, we need to be cognizant of how social and professional networks are changing the information, education, and practice dynamics of healthcare. These tools have great potential to improve our system of healthcare and should be used early and often.

Christopher A. Longhurst, M.D., M.S. is an associate professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the Stanford School of Medicine, Palo Alto, Calif., and is CMIO at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, Stanford University.

Leslie Lenert, M.D., is a professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Matthew J. Goldstein, M.D., Ph.D. is a resident physician in the Department of Internal Medicine, Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Boston, Mass.

Acknowledgements

Matthew J. Goldstein, M.D. is a research fellow with Doximity Inc., and has received both cash payment and equity compensation. Christopher A. Longhurst, M.D. and Leslie Lenert, M.D., are advisory board members to Doximity Inc. and have received non-cash, equity compensation.

 

 

 


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3 Great Topics for Physicians New to Podcasting

3 Great Topics for Physicians New to Podcasting | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Podcasts can be a great way for physicians to create relevant, engaging content for patients. For physicians who are new podcasting, there are three surefire topics that will yield content that is relevant to patients and even other doctors.
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How Social Media is Improving Our Healthcare

How Social Media is Improving Our Healthcare | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Social Media is Expanding the Capacity of Healthcare While Improving Health Outcomes and Saving Healthcare Organizations’ Billions The world we live in no longer values sitting for an hour in the doctor’s waiting room to only spend 5 minutes with...
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