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Healthcare Social Media News
Top stories related to social media implementations in healthcare
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The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge is a Good Thing

The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge is a Good Thing | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
It seems that whenever something good springs up out of the ether, the naysayers and pundits do their best to put it down. This has certainly been the case with the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. Click here and here for examples of the negativity.
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Benefits and barriers: Thoughts on the use of social media in health care - A view from the Center | Deloitte Center for Health Solutions Blog

Benefits and barriers: Thoughts on the use of social media in health care - A view from the Center | Deloitte Center for Health Solutions Blog | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Social media has changed the way health care organizations connect with consumers and other stakeholders.
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The Case for Social Media in Professionalism

The Case for Social Media in Professionalism | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
I really like the way the organizers of this Mayo Clinic CME conference framed the title of my presentation today. It's not "the case for professionalism in social media" which in health care would be a no-brainer.
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Study: Social media pages focused on chronic illnesses are mostly for marketing - MedCity News

Study: Social media pages focused on chronic illnesses are mostly for marketing - MedCity News | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Study: Social media pages focused on chronic illnesses are mostly for marketing MedCity News The study was carried out by researches from Harvard Medical School, Stanford University School of Medicine and the Center for Connected Health, which is...
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Q&A with Dr. Anne Marie Cunningham

Q&A with Dr. Anne Marie Cunningham | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
How can social media change health professional education? Dr. Anne Marie Cunningham will be discussing that issue as the morning plenary speaker at ICRE’s upcoming Social Media (SoMe) Summit. A cl...
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What's News in Healthcare Social Media This week

Join +Todd Hartley and +Scott Scowcroft as they break down all the news in healthcare social media this week. The event will air at 8:00 am PT/ 11:00 am ET on Wednesday August 13, 2014....
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Are patient portals a gateway or barrier to patient-centered care...

Are patient portals a gateway or barrier to patient-centered care... | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Patient portals. They have great potential, but is it being met?

Via Ginny Dillon, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Ginny Dillon's curator insight, August 15, 5:56 AM

Patient portals are best when designed with the patient in mind.

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Social media use - Canadian medical Association Guidelines

Social media provide a unique set of opportunities and challenges for physicians. There is ongoing debate about whether the medical profession should use platforms like Twitter, Facebook and YouTube to communicate more effectively with patients and the public at large.

The CMA also monitors social media trends in health care and publishes Future Practice to help inform physicians about the growing world of social media and health information technology in Canada.

CMA guidelines 
CMA — Social media and Canadian physicians (2012; most recent)

Additional resources
WMA Statement on the Professional and Ethical use of Social Media


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Julie Munro's curator insight, August 18, 5:36 AM
 

Highlights of the guidelines include:

 

Electronic communications present particular privacy concerns because of the nature of the medium. All patients should receive a copy of the doctor's communications protocol and social media policy.

 

A patient’s public disclosure of his own personal health information does absolve physicians of the obligation to keep PHI confidential; the obligation is owed to the patient and only the patient may waive the obligation via expressed or implied consent.

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What's next in healthcare marketing: 6 trends to empower patients and drive loyalty

What's next in healthcare marketing: 6 trends to empower patients and drive loyalty | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
We’re more than halfway through 2014 and if your marketing plan isn't hitting the KPIs you put in place, maybe it’s time for a little refresh. Today’s healthcare consumer looks a little different (What's next in healthcare marketing?
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Scaling Social for 22 Million Customers: Bupa Healthcare Success Story - YouTube

Learn how UK-based global healthcare group, Bupa uses Hootsuite Enterprise to scale their social media efforts with multiple teams across 190 markets serving...
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Bitter Pill: Doctors Not Swallowing Social Media Fervor

Bitter Pill: Doctors Not Swallowing Social Media Fervor | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it

 

Want a doctor to treat you via social media?

Don’t hold your breath — unless you look good blue.

In June, a study by MedData Group found that 44 percent of U.S. physicians weren’t using social media sites for professional services.

If doctors are using social networking as part of their job, it’s profession-related sites that were the platforms of choice.

In a story posted at eMarketer, it was disclosed that “around one-third of respondents used LinkedIn, and 29 percent were active on online physician communities, compared with just 3 percent who used online patient portals.”

Doctors are not gravitating toward social sites that are popular among the general public. These experienced low engagement among physicians.

Why the hesitancy?

It’s not for lack of knowledge. Rather, doctors cite “patient privacy and a lack of time” as the leading reasons they stay away from using social networks for their doctoring pursuits.

Polling by Digital Insights Group revealed that the general consensus among physicians is that social just isn’t an important resource when it comes to doing their jobs. Only 14 percent of primary care physicians said that social networks were a somewhat or very important clinical resource, compared with 30 percent who said they “weren’t important at all.”

When doctors do turn to digital resources to make decisions, they’re most likely using search engines, according to April 2014 research also conducted by MedData Group. Among U.S. physicians surveyed, a whopping 78 percent said search engines were the online resource they used in the medical decision-making process. A mere 5 percent cited social media.


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Art Jones's curator insight, August 12, 9:16 PM

Internet Savvy = Yes

Internet Engaged = High

Social Media Usage = Low


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Social Media in Healthcare Growing Stronger — CIO Dashboard

Social Media in Healthcare Growing Stronger — CIO Dashboard | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Only 29% of health industry leaders believe that social media is of strategic importance for external communication, collaboration, and commerce.
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Healthcare Marketing: 5 Social Media Examples

Healthcare Marketing: 5 Social Media Examples | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Discover 5 ways hospitals and other health providers are integrating social media into their healthcare marketing mix on the TopRank® Online Marketing Blog.
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Physician use of social media: Navigating the risks - ModernMedicine

Physician use of social media: Navigating the risks - ModernMedicine | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Physician use of social media: Navigating the risks
ModernMedicine
physician social media As social media use in the United States continues to grow, physicians are realizing how valuable a tool it can be for marketing and patient interaction.
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Video: The Story of Digital Health

Video: The Story of Digital Health | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
For some time now I have been a member of the Digital Health group on LinkedIn. I’m one of 27,000 total members!
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Study: How Patients Want to Communicate with Their Doctors

Study: How Patients Want to Communicate with Their Doctors | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Do patients want to use patient portal software? We surveyed 430 patients who had seen their primary care physician within the last year to find out.

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, August 20, 5:28 AM

Phone first (makes sense when it comes to health discussion); and online going strong (when it comes to admin tasks..)

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How should Healthcare be using Social Media?

How should Healthcare be using Social Media? | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
"Sorry to hear that you've contracted MRSA..." "I'm afraid that we can't provide those strong painkillers over the counter, we need to see your insurance details first" "No, fish fingers are not a ...
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Should doctors or hospitals follow their patients on Twitter?

Should doctors or hospitals follow their patients on Twitter? | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
That's the underlying question Hinda Mandell, Ph.D.
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Beyond the Buzz: A Guide to Social Media Monitoring for Healthcare

Beyond the Buzz: A Guide to Social Media Monitoring for Healthcare | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Social media is a two-way conversation that requires you to listen more than you talk.
Dean Berg's insight:

Excellent list of social media monitoring tools from Marie Ennis-O'Connor.

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Anneliz Hannan's curator insight, August 16, 10:49 AM

Marie Ennis O'Connor (@JBBC)  is terrific on curating resource lists for healthcare. Check them all out on List.ly

Marie Ennis-O'Connor's comment, August 16, 12:09 PM
Thanks so much for sharing
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How Physicians can Leverage Online Tools to Improve Marketing Strategies

How Physicians can Leverage Online Tools to Improve Marketing Strategies | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it

In today’s technological savvy world, it is not enough for a physician to rely on referrals or word of mouth to build a patient base. Running a private practice is a business, just like any other, and marketing is a key part of creating a connection not only with potential patients, but also with networking partners and collaborates. Consider some ways a physician can leverage online tools to expand his or her reach.

Hospital Websites

Becker’s Hospital Review points out a website is a critical business tool for hospitals. The relationship between a medical facility and a physician is symbiotic. Doctors can use this to their advantage when planning marketing strategies. The “Find-a-Doctor” database allows you to become part of the hospital community. You should check regularly to ensure your name appears in the hospital directory. Consider creating listings under the doctor’s name and name of the practice to increase the odds of a hit, too.

Physicians can use the hospital website to gain exposure in other ways, as well. Query the hospital administrator about guest blogging or writing an article for the newsletter. Volunteer for a social media Q and A. The more people who see your name in connection with the hospital, the better. Ask about paid ads either online or as part of the newsletter, too.

Directories

Add your name and practice to online databases such as Healthgrades.com or ZocDoc.com. These sites target searches to connect patients with physicians in their area. While you are at it, add a posting to business directories, as well. Google MyBusiness, for example, puts your name and practice on local maps. Other options include:

Yellow PagesMD.comYelpFoursquare

Social Media

Becker’s also states that patients between the ages of 18 and 24 rely on information from social media sites. Leveraging this form of communication will increase your access to lifelong patients and emerging families. Facebook and Twitter are obvious choices, but expand your social media horizons to include video options.

Film short discussions on current health care issues and post them to your YouTube channel. For example, a quick blurb about controlling blood pressure through diet or summer eating habits provides helpful information on a topic you can cover quickly. Ecommerce University suggests that videos under two minutes get the most views on YouTube. Tip: If the video is shorter in length, transcribe the video in the notes section for better SEO results.

Once you have videos uploaded, use your other social media and website assets to promote them. You can embed a video directly onto the practice’s Facebook page. Create discussion groups or a video blog with a comments section on the website to talk about current issues covered in the videos, too. The more personal you make it, the stronger the impact.

Don’t lose sight of the big picture when planning your marketing campaigns. The goal is to connect. Doctors can leverage a number of online tools to make that happen. Improving communication options though patient portals, dedicated social media pages and videos are practical, cost-effective approaches to physician marketing.

 


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How Are Disease-Related Facebook Pages Used? - iHealthBeat

How Are Disease-Related Facebook Pages Used? - iHealthBeat | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
A study published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research finds 32.2% of Facebook pages about diseases are for marketing and promotional purposes, while just 9.4% of such pages are used for general social support. The study shows 20.7% of disease-related Facebook pages aim to raise awareness and 15.5% provide Wikipedia-type information.
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Five Reasons for Providers to Embrace Social Media

Five Reasons for Providers to Embrace Social Media | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it

Physicians today often find themselves asking, "Who has time for social media?" Since most providers are focused on the chaos of reimbursements, busy practices and healthcare reform, it's no wonder that social media time is not a high priority.

But if you’ve been paying attention to society, business, and commerce over the last few years, you would know that social media has developed a very effective purpose in helping professionals communicate, engage in professional development and build meaningful reputations in their fields.

Social media is also a very effective way for physicians to manage their online reputations, which has become more and more important in today’s competitive healthcare marketplace.

Many physicians will argue that engaging in social media could be beneficial, but also brings about a certain amount of risk. Dr. John Mandrola negates this argument in hisMedCity News article titled, Doctors and Social Media: It’s Time To Embrace Change. 

Dr. Mandrola writes, “But I ask: What medical intervention, what shot at making things better, comes free of risk? A rule of doctoring is that to do good a doctor must risk doing harm. A distinguished heart surgeon once consoled me—after I had caused a procedural complication—that if I didn’t want complications, I shouldn’t do anything.”

Dr. Mandrola sees the “risk” argument as a confining attitude that many physicians often take – keeping them trapped in the same outdated rituals that have perpetuated the healthcare industry for years.

“In the hyper-connected world of 2014, medical professionals have reached a fork in the road. One path is a road well traveled. On this familiar route, we continue to keep our heads down, stay in the weeds, out of trouble. Don’t wiggle; don’t rock the boat; check the boxes; fill out the forms and accept what comes. Don’t dare engage in the online conversation. Choosing this path is like not treating a disease: less ownership confers less personal risk.”

Dr. Russel Faust provides five great reasons in his Whitepaper, Social Media Guide for Docs, 12 Tips For Beginners.  

You will gain market share– yes, it will help grow your practice!You will be recognized as an authority in your area of practice (which will also growyour practice).You will be better connected with your patients: compliance with your diagnostic and treatment regimens will improve (healthier patients, reduced readmissions).Your patients will arrive to appointments better- educated, and take less time: it will streamline your work flow!Your patients will be less needy outside of your clinic: they will require less time on the phone with you and your nurses.

 


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Dealing with Negative Online Reviews of Doctors

Dealing with Negative Online Reviews of Doctors | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it
Doctors train for many years and work very hard to maintain robust practices, so it is only natural that they are very protective about their reputations.
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95 Million Americans Use Smartphones to Access Health Information

95 Million Americans Use Smartphones to Access Health Information | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it

95 million US adults have used their smartphones to access health tools and information this year, according to the Cybercitizen Health U.S. 2013 survey by Manhattan Research.


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Social Media in Healthcare: a Prescription for Success

Social Media in Healthcare: a Prescription for Success | Healthcare Social Media News | Scoop.it

As social media became an accepted communications tool in recent years, it’s safe to say that the healthcare industry has been slower than most to adopt it, in spite of all of its intrinsic benefits. 

Why? There can be many factors, but Christina Thielst, a social media consultant and editor of a book from HIMSS entitledApplying Social Media Technologies in Healthcare Environments said the problem primarily can be attributed to media reports about security breaches and personal health information being leaked inadvertently via social media. 

Knowing that healthcare puts a lot of necessary emphasis on privacy and security, as outlined by HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act), it’s no wonder the industry was a little spooked. I think most industries were rattled initially, or at least they didn’t take social media seriously at first. I can remember thinking, “Is this really going to be something more than what teenagers use to communicate with one another?” (C’mon, you know you had the same thought in social media’s nascent stage.) 

However, now the healthcare industry has embraced social media, and as Thielst pointed out in a Healthcare IT News article entitled “Social Media Taking Hold in Healthcare,” there are three main reasons why. 

The most regular users of healthcare systems are, well, older, and they are finally getting used to social media tools. Most have gotten used to using them on a personal level, and now recognize that those same tools can be used beyond that application. Since marketing through more traditional outlets (such as newspaper advertising) has become more expensive and challenging with reduced audiences, hospital administrators have realized the advantages to social media.Media stories about social media have gotten better. And, organizations like the American College of Healthcare Executives and HIMSS have been putting a lot of effort into teaching healthcare executives the value of social media and how to use it.

One key area that social media has proved to be an invaluable tool in healthcare is in the patient-provider relationship.

Healthcare providers are seeing the advantages to a blog with helpful content that helps patients inform themselves and make decisions about their care. Or, using Facebook and YouTube to answer questions from the community or conduct live chats with experts from the healthcare organization, or to post a video about the right way to wear a bike helmet to prevent injury if involved in a bike accident. 

The possibilities are endless and healthcare providers are now understanding how it allows them to connect with their patients in an efficient and effective way.

Sometimes, it can help in a traumatic situation in which response time is crucial.  According to a US News & World Report article, when the Boston Marathon bombing occurred: “After reading about the marathon bombings on Twitter, trauma teams in Boston last year were able to ready themselves for surgery much sooner than they would have if they'd had to wait for a traditional news report.”

Some healthcare organizations have their nurses create professional Facebook and Twitter accounts separate from their personal accounts. Once their patients friend and/or follow them, the connection has been made. It allows them to have a personal connection with their patients beyond their stay or office visit, and a level of trust and respect is a natural result. 

In some cases, social media in healthcare in this sense can literally save a life. Ruthi Moore, director of nursing at the Navy-Marine Corp Relief Society, tells of an instance in that sameUS News article when one of her nurses saw a post from a veteran who was thanking everyone, and she became suspicious he was going to be doing something he shouldn’t. Instead of the standard phone call, she went right to his home explaining that she was in the neighborhood anyway. Her hunch proved right as when she got there, the man had a gun in his hand.  She was able to get him to give her the gun and remove the bullets.  Had she not found his post on Facebook, he might have committed suicide.

Though not always this dramatic, the benefits of social media are numerous in healthcare, and I think we have only seen the tip of the iceberg in terms of how it will continue to enhance the patient-provider connection. And, since providers are so time-strapped when you are in their presence, social media will allow them to extend their caring demeanor beyond the office visit or hospital stay. A true prescription for success.

 


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