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ICTs and the Health Sector (OECD)

ICTs and the Health Sector (OECD) | Healthcare Lifesciences | Scoop.it

The future sustainability of health systems will depend on how well governments are able to anticipate and respond to efficiency and quality of care challenges. Bold action is required, as well as willingness to test innovative care delivery approaches.

 

The greatest promise for transformational change is in applications that encourage new, ubiquitous, participatory preventive and personalised smart models of care. A whole new world of possibilities in using mobiles and the Internet to address healthcare challenges has opened up. The potential of mobile devices, services and applications to support self-management, behavioural modification and "participatory healthcare" is greater than ever before.

 

A key hurdle is, however, the big data challenge, dealing with the exponentially accelerating accumulation of patient data – all of which must be mined, stored securely and accurately, and converted to meaningful information at the point of care. In order to fully exploit the new smart approaches to care, acceptance, privacy and usability issues will also have to be carefully considered.

  


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The 4 Pillars Of Stable Leadership | Forbes

The 4 Pillars Of Stable Leadership | Forbes | Healthcare Lifesciences | Scoop.it

Stability is something we don’t often think about as a leadership quality – that is until it’s absent. 

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Great Read !!

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3 Key Trends Transforming Manufacturing | PTC

Not surprisingly, as market and technological forces usher in a new era of manufacturing and economic opportunity, strategic transformation has become a necessity. Over two-thirds (68 percent) of manufacturing firms are ...
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Interesting post....strategy planning vs pure operational excellence, Service Imperatives and Technology Innovation using smart, highly integrated sensors based products will drive competitive differentiation.

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Pharma data miner Treato scores $14.5M | mobihealthnews

Pharma data miner Treato scores $14.5M | mobihealthnews | Healthcare Lifesciences | Scoop.it

Treato, an Israeli company that scours thousands of social media sites to glean patient insights about pharmaceuticals and treatments, has landed $14.5 million in new capital. 

 

Launched about a year and a half ago, Treato has developed an algorithm to search across social media sites large and small, from Facebook on down to local online communities for patients with specific medical conditions, to ascertain what people are saying about medications. Treato looks for patterns that could signify adverse reactions to drugs, off-label uses, reasons why people switch from one medication to another and other bits of intelligence.


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ehealthgr's curator insight, July 31, 2013 6:47 PM

Not semantic yet, but this is trully more close to the future. Social media without the filtering is just a big load of unrelevant, fuzzy data. Besides that filtering forums and online communities is not something so exotic. Online communication and experience exchange existed even before web 2.0 and social media. 

eMedToday's curator insight, July 31, 2013 7:14 PM

Great resource for Pharma

Franklin Delano Williams's curator insight, July 31, 2013 8:36 PM
ehealthgr's insight:

Not semantic yet, but this is trully more close to the future. Social media without the filtering is just a big load of unrelevant, fuzzy data. Besides that filtering forums and online communities is not something so exotic. Online communication and experience exchange existed even before web 2.0 and social media. 

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The Wise Leader !

The Wise Leader ! | Healthcare Lifesciences | Scoop.it

Smartness is the operating currency of organizational culture in the 21st-century. Whether it’s called cleverness, practical intelligence, or savvy, one can never have too much of it in a company. Smart leaders can see patterns in seemingly random information, enabling them to take decisive action while their peers are still assessing a situation, and to make the strategic choices that bring competitive advantage. But there are two categories of smartness, both of which carry benefits and risks. Most executives favor one or the other, and that makes it more difficult for them to lead.


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Fouad Bendris's curator insight, June 6, 2013 4:13 AM

Pratical wisdom in Business comes from combining the broad view with the narrow, and oppportunity with constraint ...

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Managing the people side of risk | McKinsey & Company

Managing the people side of risk | McKinsey & Company | Healthcare Lifesciences | Scoop.it

Companies can create a powerful risk culture without turning the organization upside down. Most executives take managing risk quite seriously, the better to avoid the kinds of crises that can destroy value, ruin reputations, and even bring a company down. Especially in the wake of the global financial crisis, many have strived to put in place more thorough risk-related processes and oversight structures in order to detect and correct fraud, safety breaches, operational errors, and overleveraging long before they become full-blown disasters !


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Fouad Bendris's curator insight, May 20, 2013 12:51 PM

Obviously, a shortage of risk consciousness will lead to trouble. But it is all too easy to assume that a thorough set of risk-related processes and oversight structures is sufficient to avert a crisis. Companies cannot assume that a healthy risk culture will be a natural result. Rather, leadership teams must tackle risk culture just as thoroughly as any business problem, demanding evidence about the underlying attitudes that pervade day-to-day risk decisions.