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United Kingdom United in Support for mHealth

United Kingdom United in Support for mHealth | Healthcare IT Services | Scoop.it

The United Kingdom is quickly emerging as a hotbed of activity for mHealth and its expansion. Mobile health, telemedicine, and all facets of mobile and


Via Philippe Loizon, The e-Health Network
Joseph Walent's insight:

Look for #CSC to act as a central provider as thse movement gets legs.

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Tim Mustill's curator insight, August 30, 2013 6:56 AM

True... but only 9% penetration of health/lifestyle apps could be interpreted as slow uptake (or appetite) just as readily as being characterised as latent demand.

Dan Baxter's curator insight, August 30, 2013 5:37 PM

Nearly 30% of over 50's in the UK have a smartphone!

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Rescooped by Joseph Walent from Case Management in Health Care
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5 Tips to Help 20-Somethings Manage Health Care Costs - DailyFinance

5 Tips to Help 20-Somethings Manage Health Care Costs - DailyFinance | Healthcare IT Services | Scoop.it
If you're in your 20s it's the ideal time to consider your future health care needs so you're financially ready to tackle health issues when they arise.

Via American Institute Health Care Professionals
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American Institute Health Care Professionals's curator insight, September 5, 2013 2:20 PM

Some good tips from certified case managers to you.  Young people in their twenties have alot of opportunity to save some dollars here and there for health care from having a high deductible to ordering generic prescriptions.  If you are interested in learning more about case management, then please review the program.

#casemanagementprogram

Rescooped by Joseph Walent from Office Environments Of The Future
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Chair Pitched as Answer to New Ways We Sit on Job

Chair Pitched as Answer to New Ways We Sit on Job | Healthcare IT Services | Scoop.it
Chair Pitched as Answer to New Ways We Sit on Job
New York Times
Like most office chairs, you can make this one taller or shorter when you press a lever on the chair's stem.

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Charting the Future of Capacity Building for mHealth

Charting the Future of Capacity Building for mHealth | Healthcare IT Services | Scoop.it

Last month, 130 doctors, nurses, development workers, techies, government officials, and academics from 35 countries joined us on an exciting four-week journey through the latest developments in mHealth.

 

Three observations/trends emerged during the course:

 

Mobile data collection most discussed! Mobile data collection, management and analysis gained significant attention in the course forums. We were thrilled to be joined by Yaw Onokwa, one of the founders of Open Data Kit and Jeremy of CommCare who provided students with live demos of their respective software packages and shared a number of insights and best practices for developing surveys, acquiring and managing users, scaling data projects and more. The always-engaging Alain Labrique (Johns Hopkins University) joined us for a fantastic session on the continuum of care that touched on his exciting work in Bangladesh and the importance of investing in the evidence base.

 

The importance of human centered design (HCD): Human-centered design also featured prominently throughout the four weeks. Isaac Holman (co-founder of Medic Mobile) led participants through an exercise in drawing/mapping a health ecosystem based on HCD principles. Design experts Erica Kochi (UNICEF Innovation) and Robert Fabricant (Frog Design) shared a wealth of insights from their experiences in successfully launching and sustaining mHealth projects in a number of countries. For many of these world-class practitioners, this was the first time they had ever presented in an online course like this.

 

Fewer pilots + design for scale: After the New York Times featured an article last spring entitled The Benefits of Mobile Health on Hold there was certainly a lot of room for debate and critical discussion about “pilotitis”. Patty Mechael noted that one trend she has observed in last year is fewer organizations are starting pilots more are focused on designing for scale from the onset of a project. And finally, Gustav Praekelt shared the amazing work his foundation has undertaken to team up with leading private sector entities in South Africa to achieve scale (1 million+) in fighting HIV and preparing mothers for childbirth.

 

Three highlights from the course:

 

Techies + Healthies: We featured a TEDx Talk by Josh Nesbit titled, “Techies + Healthies”, which prompted an insightful discussion about the need to promote more engagement between practitioners from both fields. We also asked participants to reflect on their own orientation on the healthie – techie spectrum.

 

Zombies, Zombies, Zombies: What would a TechChange course be without a Zombie Apocalypse. This time, participants had to respond to an impending zombie invasion and practice gathering vital health and preparedness data using tools like Magpi, FrontlineSMS, CommCare formhub, OpenDataKit and more.

 

What a Map! We asked participants to describe the health systems in their own countries and then crowdsourced an interactive Google Map of everyone’s responses. I personally learned a tremendous amount about the challenges and opportunities that exist in other countries through this visualization and am excited to do more of these kinds of activities in future courses.


Via nrip
Joseph Walent's insight:

IT Service providers with a leagacy in mobile application development and testing will have a leg-up on their competition.

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When Smartphones Do a Doctor’s Job | MIT

When Smartphones Do a Doctor’s Job | MIT | Healthcare IT Services | Scoop.it

At EyeNetra, the startup he cofounded, goofy curiosities like plastic eyeballs line the shelves, and a 3-D printing machine whirs in the background. It’s printing out prototypes of a device that will attach to your smartphone and, in a minute or two, tell you what kind of eyeglasses you need.

The device, called the Netra-G, is based on some clever optics and software Pamplona came up with—a way to measure the refractive error of the eye using a smartphone screen and an inexpensive pair of plastic binoculars. The whole setup might cost a few dollars to make. It does the job of a $5,000 instrument called an autorefractor.

 

More important, just about anyone could use it. That’s where the disruption comes in—and the trouble. Right now, only doctors or optometrists can prescribe glasses or contact lenses. Pamplona, a brash Brazilian programmer who arrived in the U.S. a few years ago, thinks that won’t always be the case. “We’re changing medicine by providing the user the right to measure themselves,” he says. “We see doctors as more of a coach.”


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Halona Joy's curator insight, September 14, 2013 1:50 AM

Botox mot rynker specialist Center could be a non-public specialist clinic of 600 money supply within the heart of Christianity. The middle contains a short latency to the specialist, and you are doing not would like a referral.http://oslohudlegesenter.no/

Andrew N Levy's curator insight, September 15, 2013 8:36 PM

The first thing I notice is that the rest of the title has been cut off. The whole title should read, "When Smartphones Do a Doctor's Job...Better". What does that tell you about the state of physicians in this country when an app could potentially replace them? Can we really blame them when the Affordable Care Act will leave them getting reimbursed about as much as chiropractors get now? (i.e. not much)

Rescooped by Joseph Walent from The e-health Network
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United Kingdom United in Support for mHealth

United Kingdom United in Support for mHealth | Healthcare IT Services | Scoop.it

The United Kingdom is quickly emerging as a hotbed of activity for mHealth and its expansion. Mobile health, telemedicine, and all facets of mobile and


Via Philippe Loizon, The e-Health Network
Joseph Walent's insight:

Look for #CSC to act as a central provider as thse movement gets legs.

more...
Tim Mustill's curator insight, August 30, 2013 6:56 AM

True... but only 9% penetration of health/lifestyle apps could be interpreted as slow uptake (or appetite) just as readily as being characterised as latent demand.

Dan Baxter's curator insight, August 30, 2013 5:37 PM

Nearly 30% of over 50's in the UK have a smartphone!