Healthcare Experience Design
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Doctors and Tech: Who Serves Whom?

Doctors and Tech: Who Serves Whom? | Healthcare Experience Design | Scoop.it
“Giving physicians more say in how to incorporate technology into their work is good for patients, and the field.”If you want to discourage a worker, subject them to policies and procedures that don’t make sense. This principle was first described by Frederick Herzberg, an American psychologist who developed one of the most widely studied theories of workplace motivation. Unfortunately, Herzberg’s principle is being widely applied today in medicine. Changes in healthcare payment systems, the use of information technology, and the doctor-patient relationship have left many doctors deeply discouraged....It is easy for many healthcare leaders to forget that doctors go into medicine not because they enjoy entering data into complex electronic health records and ensuring that their employer gets paid for everything they do, but because they want to make good diagnoses, prescribe appropriate treatments, and help patients....What can be done? Weygandt argues that doctors need to play a more active role in all aspects of healthcare’s future, not just implementing but also designing it. Too often, such decisions are currently being made by people who do not take care of patients, and in many cases, have never cared for patients.“Every innovation should be tested not just to see if it increases revenue or cuts costs,” he says, “but also to ensure that it enhances the doctor-patient relationship.”Everyone involved in contemporary healthcare—patients, doctors, nurses, hospital administrators, payers, and politicians—needs to recognize the importance of preserving and promoting medical professionalism. Good medical care is an art as well as a science, and the professionalism of doctors is at its core. “Doctors should be encouraged to think first not of their own incomes but the needs of their patients, and that means designing systems that keep the patient front and center.”...New technology can do a better job of helping doctors practice better medicine.... But change isn’t easy. ...As Frederick Herzberg would put it, “If we want doctors to do better work, we need to give them better work to do.” Medicine practiced well—in such a way that it really makes a difference in the lives of patients, families, and communities—is a great deal more fulfilling than medicine practiced poorly. If doctors are to enjoy the opportunity to make such a difference, they must cease to be the tools of their tools, and instead become their designers.
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Zephyr Health Help Life Sciences Navigate Big Data, Bring Therapies To Market Faster | TechCrunch

Zephyr Health Help Life Sciences Navigate Big Data, Bring Therapies To Market Faster | TechCrunch | Healthcare Experience Design | Scoop.it
The Big Data landscape continued to explode in 2013, as companies across the board scrambled to update infrastructure and technology to meet the new set of..

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Big Data in Healthcare: Social Media Can Help Track Disease Outbreaks, Pandemics

Big Data in Healthcare: Social Media Can Help Track Disease Outbreaks, Pandemics | Healthcare Experience Design | Scoop.it

While most industries today collect data – a lot of data – the healthcare industry may take the proverbial cake when it comes to the amount of potential data to collect. Think about it: given that science had now decoded the human genome, every patient walks into the front door of a doctor’s office, clinic or hospital automatically carrying about a terabyte of data before any patient history is even taken or physical examination is begun.

Beyond the codes contained in a patient’s body or the background contained in his or her medical history, or the images that can be captured via x-rays, CT scans, PET scans and MRIs, there is a plethora of other information that can be added to the “big data” pile, according to Frank X. Speidel, MD, writing for HIT Consultant.

“Beyond clinical, physiologic metrics, we ought also to capture the data of all that affects the patient,” writes Speidel. “Much of this expanded data will be unstructured such as is present in social network data set or quantified but predicted such as weather reports and pollen counts.”

Speidel recounts the story of two college students who presented to a hospital where he once worked as an emergency physician with lesions characteristic of meningococcemia. In an era before social media, university officials had to painstakingly piece together the students’ movements and activities over the past several days in order to determine whom the students had had close personal contact with.

“Flash forward to 2013,” writes Dr. Speidel. “Given the same presentation of two college students with meningococcemia, how much improved would our care be if we had access to their Twitter and Facebook data as we sought to identify those who had close contact with the students?”

Public health officials have already begun to tap social media as an excellent tool for tracking disease outbreaks. This, of course, raises privacy issues, which are much on the nation’s mind since the revelations about the NSA’s data tracking.

“There’s a challenge here in that some of these [data] systems are tightening in terms of access,” John Brownstein, director of the computational epidemiology group at Children’s Hospital Boston and an associate professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, told the NIH publication Environmental Health Perspectives. “But we are seeing a movement towards data philanthropy in that companies are looking for ways to release data for health research without risking privacy. And at the same time, government officials and institutions at all levels see the data’s value and potential.”

In the future, we might see ourselves signing waivers or addenda to our social media accounts indicating that it’s OK for health officials to mine our data for critical information in case of an outbreak or a pandemic. It’s one more element of “big data” that could ultimately be used to save lives.


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Learner-Centered Tools to Support #Gamification

Learner-Centered Tools to Support #Gamification | Healthcare Experience Design | Scoop.it

If an experience is learner-centered, then learners have control over how they engage and interact with the content, when they engage with the content, and with what devices they want to use to engage online. While in this platform, the administrator is deciding what content should be included in a Collection, the user decides the rest.

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Microsoft’s Sean Nolan on electronic medical records, their storage, and the future of health tech

Microsoft’s Sean Nolan on electronic medical records, their storage, and the future of health tech | Healthcare Experience Design | Scoop.it
Working with health data is a tricky business. Consumers want to access such information when they need it, and that it be kept safe and secure when they don't. Regulations, however, ...

Via Alex Butler, Michael Lucht - www.b-innovative.eu
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Could an app replicate the placebo effect?

Could an app replicate the placebo effect? | Healthcare Experience Design | Scoop.it

NEW RESEARCH SHOWS DECEPTION MAY NOT BE NECESSARY FOR THE PLACEBO EFFECT

 

Daniel Jacobs believes in the placebo effect, the well-documented but not well-understood phenomenon in which sick patients sometimes feel the same healing effects from swallowing a sugar pill that...

 

That’s the basis of his startup, Placebo Effect, which is raising $50,000 through the crowdfunding site Indiegogo to build his prototype into an iPhone app that he says can harness the placebo effect in order to help people make positive changes in their lives, such as feeling happier or quitting smoking.

 

The app offers a variety of "placebos," including images of a pill, a magic wand, a communion wafer, and other options. "Placebo pills are actually chosen often. About 12 percent of people in our testing choose pills," he said. "The reason for that probably is that in our society, we feel that pills work really well."

 

He’s done limited testing with good results, he said, and plans to do more. So far, 39 people self-reported an average of 31 percent increase in the effect they were trying to create in their lives, for example joy, energy, physical healing, or love, after one use. Seven users reported no change, and one person reported a negative change and did not complete the trial.

Jacobs’ idea may sound a bit bogus, especially since it is widely believed that the placebo effect only works if the patient believes he or she is taking a real treatment. This perceived need for deception is part of the reason doctors don’t prescribe placebos, despite the fact that they can occasionally work as well as FDA-approved treatments for some conditions.

 

 

 


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California researchers create apps for health studies

California researchers create apps for health studies | Healthcare Experience Design | Scoop.it
Does oversleeping make you depressed? Do certain types of patients do better on new medication?  Which streets worsen asthma symptoms? ... (Who says #mhealth apps are just a fad?
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Marcio C de C Dupont's comment, February 16, 2014 10:05 AM
Hi follow my design research - healthcare design twitter at @maducao Thanks!
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Social networks to reduce inpatient isolation, address consumer satisfaction trend in healthcare

Social networks to reduce inpatient isolation, address consumer satisfaction trend in healthcare | Healthcare Experience Design | Scoop.it
As hospitals wrangle with the question of how to improve consumer satisfaction as a trend in healthcare, New York Presbyterian Hospital got some ideas by hosting a weekend hackathon. The challenge? Improve the hospital’s online patient portal, myNYP, which helps patients track health records and schedule doctors’ appointments.About 16 teams responded to the throw down. They were guided by a set of criteria such as ease of use for patients, clear design, whether it’s a new idea and the usefulness to the hospital and patients, according to its website.The top two teams set out to solve a common challenge for anyone who has stayed in a hospital for more than a couple of days: social isolation. The team that placed first developed PresbyHangouts, a Google Hangout that would be restricted to the hospital’s network. It would allow inpatients to connect with other patients with common interests. They could play games together and communicate through instant messaging and video chat. It would also be used to deliver educational content to patients to boost health literacy.A summary of its submission said: “By opening conversations and opportunities, our platform will change the way hospitals do patient engagement and education outreach.” The five-member team included Hannah Oppenheimer of Brooklyn; Michael Wenger of Hoboken, N.J.; Andrea Cremese of Brooklyn; and Eric Chen of Manhattan, as well as an emergency room physician from Berkeley, Dan Firepine — and walked away with $50,000.The second-place group created an app called Intermed that allows patients to connect with other patients and “mentors” based on their interests or condition. They could also use the portal to connect with friends and family through social networks. It would also help them access tools that promote relaxation and meditation, such as calming music. Spotify, anyone? Team members Stanislav Bogdanov and John Kinney walked away with $25,000.As part of the Affordable Care Act, hospitals are under pressure to ensure they do well on the consumer satisfaction questionnaire given to patients. Nearly $1 billion in hospital payments are based, in part, on patient satisfaction. Hospitals with high scores get a bonus payment, but those with low scores lose money.Among the judges were Cyrus Massoumi, founder and CEO of ZocDoc; Mario Schlosser, co-founder and co-CEO of Oscar; Scott Schwaitzberg, Civic Innovation, Google; Brad Weinberg, Blueprint Health co-founder; and Aurelia Boyer, the hospital’s CIO.Read more: http://medcitynews.com/2014/03/hospital-hackers-create-social-network-inpatients-reduce-isolation/#ixzz2wu7wQKtm
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How Artificial Intelligence Could Improve Health Care

How Artificial Intelligence Could Improve Health Care | Healthcare Experience Design | Scoop.it
Three IU researchers are working to develop a computer system they say could improve the quality and decrease the cost of medical treatment.

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What are the top 5 ways physicians use tablets and smartphones in their medical practice?

What are the top 5 ways physicians use tablets and smartphones in their medical practice? | Healthcare Experience Design | Scoop.it

A survey of 1400 doctors reveals the top five ways they are using tablets and smartphones in their clinical practices.

 

In a clinical work setting, doctors who have electronic health records said they use their smartphones in clinical settings every day to:

 

Send and receive emails (65 percent);

 

Use apps (51 percent);

 

Instant messaging (50 percent);

 

Researching information about medications (35 percent);

 

Communicating with other physicians (32 percent).

 

 

But switch “smartphones” to “tablets” and you get this response:

 

 

Send and receive e-mails (52.4 percent);

 

Accessing electronic health records (50.6 percent);

 

Accessing diagnostic information (41.7 percent);

 

Research information about medication (33.3 percent);

 

Staying up to date with medical journals and papers (29.8 percent).

 

 

Among the other findings were

 

A little more than 60 percent access electronic medical records through their device’s browser rather than thru the vendor’s app.

 

One-third of EHR users and one-quarter of non-EHR users use a tablet device in their medical practice.

 

More than 70 percent of tablet users who access EHR through them have a password.

 

About 32 percent have a device tracker app installed on their tablet and the ability to remotely wipe all data on their tablet if lost or stolen (31 percent).

 

EHR users spend 25 hours on their tablet each week, with a greater amount of time spent on business (59%) than for personal reasons (41 percent).

 


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Serious business of gaming

Serious business of gaming | Healthcare Experience Design | Scoop.it

"Gamification, gamefullness and alternative reality sound like fun, but as Anna Jackson explains, they are important and serious gaming concepts."


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Luca Brigada's curator insight, March 19, 2013 6:48 PM

Gamification is "the use of game mechanics and game design techniques in non-game contexts" (mashable.com) and it's a huge trend in marketing right now, as well as an idea that is being embraced in health, education and non-profit sectors.

 

Examples of gamification are:

- Badges to reward participation (e.g foursquare)

- Assigning missions and using levels of achievementImposing time limits Points

- Rewards and leaderboardsMaking everyday tasks fun by turning them into a game.

 

Matmi's curator insight, March 28, 2013 6:55 AM

Like this author states - gaming is a serious business. Games are no longer just a teengage boys hobby - they are a serious revenue generating tool. More and more people from all walks of life are playing casual mobile games so there is even more of a need for businesses to be ahead of the game ( excuse the pun ) and have their own game developed to get customers interacting with their brand.

Danny Ong's curator insight, September 24, 2013 1:26 AM

In this article, it is shown how people applies gaming-related concepts into their daily activities. Therefore, if we could apply the same concepts when it comes to businesses, plenty of improvement will be seen among the people. One of the example is Foursquare giving people achievements if they had logged into several places using Foursquare. If this concept is applied to the business people, there might had a chance they are motivated by the rewards that will be given if they done an excellent job.

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Computer scientist publishes new algorithm cluster to data mine health records

Computer scientist publishes new algorithm cluster to data mine health records | Healthcare Experience Design | Scoop.it
The time may be fast approaching for researchers to take better advantage of the vast amount of valuable patient information available from U.S. electronic health records.

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Infographic: The Neurology of Gaming

Infographic: The Neurology of Gaming | Healthcare Experience Design | Scoop.it
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Gina Anderson CEO Mopi16 's comment, May 15, 2013 8:06 AM
@hxdvancouver thanks for the rescoop. If you are interested in gamification and learning, be sure to connect with me on Linked In if you ever want to explore options in health care.
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CEO of Avado:Powering the disruptive innovators reinventing healthcare - Forbes

CEO of Avado:Powering the disruptive innovators reinventing healthcare - Forbes | Healthcare Experience Design | Scoop.it
CEO of Avado:Powering the disruptive innovators reinventing healthcare
Forbes
Zina Moukheiber wrote a piece recently with a headline that looks like it's written by The Onion — Government Should Slow Down Race to Implement Electronic Health Records.

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