Healthcare communications
32 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Amal Gadkari from Disruptive Digital Technology News & Views
Scoop.it!

How FDA Guidance for Pharmaceutical Marketing affects SEO

How FDA Guidance for Pharmaceutical Marketing affects SEO | Healthcare communications | Scoop.it

The FDA has published guidance on how to use Twitter and third-party sites to market pharmaceuticals. Next, the Federal agency will explain how links may be used for marketing pharmaceuticals and medical products online. What will this mean for SEO and digital marketers in the pharmaceutical industry?

 

the FDA has yet to release any guidance about links or SEO in particular. Based on the emphasis that the existing guidance places on Fair Balance and Off-Label, we can make some educated guesses about what the expected FDA guidance will, and will not, allow:

 

Pharmaceutical page content cannot be optimized to build traffic for off-label prescriptions.Site information visible on search engines (titles, meta descriptions, etc.) cannot be optimized to violate Fair Balance guidelines or promote off-label prescriptions.Pharmaceutical sites cannot solicit links from third-party sites that promote off-label uses or violate Fair Balance guidelines.Site pages cannot link to other pages that promote off-label uses or violate Fair Balance guidelines.

 

If these restraints constitute the bulk of FDA guidance, there will still be room for effective SEO. For example, site pages could be optimized to gain visibility on searches by people in a drug’s target market, or optimized to be visible for searches related to the symptoms and conditions that the drug has been certified to treat. All web pages intended for visibility on search engines would contain prominent Fair Balance information.

 

The potential for SEO in FDA-compliant marketing for pharmaceuticals is exciting and significant, but clearly SEO efforts will be most effective after the FDA provides specific guidance in this area.


Via Pharma Guy
more...
Pharma Guy's curator insight, August 13, 2014 7:21 AM


Issuing guidance relating to links is on FDA's 2014 Guidance Agenda, which you can find here.


Prior to the November, 2009, public hearing, FDA posted these questions and requests for clarification about links:


    • The agency is interested in any comments about the appropriateness of various techniques regarding the use of links (including between various social media tools) and data or research about whether or not users find these approaches to be misleading.


    • Should parameters be established for links to and from Web sites?


For more about this, read 

FDA Has One More Internet Guidance to Publish in 2014: Links
Scooped by Amal Gadkari
Scoop.it!

Mastering Brand Leadership To Reap Product Success | Best ...

Mastering Brand Leadership To Reap Product Success | Best ... | Healthcare communications | Scoop.it
This entry was posted in Industry Trends and Topics and tagged benchmarking, Best Practices, Biotech, brand leadership, brand management, business, healthcare, medical device, pharma, pharmaceutical, research.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Amal Gadkari
Scoop.it!

White Paper: 6 Steps to Building and Managing A Successful Social Media Marketing Team

White Paper: 6 Steps to Building and Managing A Successful Social Media Marketing Team | Healthcare communications | Scoop.it
White Paper: 6 Steps to Building and Managing A Successful Social Media Marketing Team http://t.co/zjT1dhqL2s
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Amal Gadkari
Scoop.it!

Top 100 Twitter Accounts For Healthcare Professionals To Follow - eMedCert

Top 100 Twitter Accounts For Healthcare Professionals To Follow - eMedCert | Healthcare communications | Scoop.it
Complete list of eMedCert's 'Top 100 Twitter Accounts For Healthcare Professionals To Follow' (Good list from @EMedCert: Top 100 Twitter Accounts For Healthcare Professionals To Follow http://t.co/imOpTlV3z1)...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Amal Gadkari from The MarTech Digest
Scoop.it!

Email Marketing: Does your copywriting accomplish these 6 key objectives? | MarketingExperiments

Email Marketing: Does your copywriting accomplish these 6 key objectives? | MarketingExperiments | Healthcare communications | Scoop.it

Digest...

 

Objective #1. Arrest attention

You can arrest their attention with a striking visual (although, with image blocking technology in many email readers, this can be reduced to a big blank space with a little red X) or a compelling headline.

 

Objective #2. Build a connection

Now you must build a connection with that prospect. You can start by bridging the gap between the headline or visual that caught their attention, and something that is meaningful to their lives.

 

Objective #3. Build the problem

The analog for email copywriting is building the problem. What pain points does the customer have? What is that situation of the world before your product, service or nonprofit comes into their lives?

 

Objective #4. Build interest

You must build interest in solving that problem, and show how it can be solved by your company.

 

Objective #5. Build suspense

You need to keep them on the hook to get them to the landing page since, after all, the conversion is not going to happen in the email. You just need to get the click to ultimately convert them on the landing page. That’s where the actual sale should happen.

 

Objective #6. Transfer momentum

Make sure wherever you send them to resolve the conflict created in your email copy – likely a landing page – continues the dialogue initiated by your email. You want a natural flow from one channel to the next, not a disjunctive change in the conversation.

 

__________________

► Receive a FREE daily summary of The Marketing Technology Alert directly to your inbox. To subscribe, please go to http://ineomarketing.com/About_The_MAR_Sub.html  (your privacy is protected).

 


Via marketingIO
more...
marketingIO's curator insight, August 11, 2014 8:12 PM

It's the same formula that you see across many different emails: attention, problem, solution, benefits, convert.

Rescooped by Amal Gadkari from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

How to Use Social Media in Health Care | Q&A With Kevin Pho

How to Use Social Media in Health Care | Q&A With Kevin Pho | Healthcare communications | Scoop.it

In May we launched a new series! Each month we are interviewing a leading expert who will help you prepare for your future career in health care.

For this month’s Q&A we spoke with Kevin Pho, founder and editor of KevinMD.com, a blog that shares stories and insights from those working in the health care field. Kevin is an internal medicine physician who specializes in health care social media. He is also the co-author of the book Establishing, Managing, and Protecting Your Online Reputation: A Social Media Guide for Physicians and Medical Practices.

Many of us use social media to connect with our friends and family, and increasingly we are using these same platforms to find and share information related to our health. As patients we are using social media to research reputations of providers, find information about our symptoms and conditions as well as a general source of information of all kinds. As future health care providers, knowing how to do things like promote your facilities’ expertise and increase access to accurate information will be valuable career skills. Read on for Kevin’s best advice for using social media in health care.

How has social media affected those working in the health care field? What are some trends you have noticed in recent years?

Social media has made health care information more transparent. Seven out of ten Internet users now use the web to look for health information, and they regularly come to their provider’s office with information that they printed out, or pulled up from their mobile devices. In some cases, patients may even have more information about their disease than their physician.

The problem, however, is that patients can’t believe everything they read online.  The Internet gives everyone a platform to be heard, but when it comes to health information, that isn’t necessarily a good thing. Sometimes, what patients are reading online is inaccurate, or even worse, harmful.

So in this transparent era where patients have as much access to information as their providers do, those in health care have to redefine themselves. Instead of seeing themselves as gatekeepers of medical and drug information, they need to become curators of that information. Health care providers need to become filters for their patients and guide them to reliable online sources for health information.

What advice can you give to someone who would like to begin using social media to manage their medical practice’s online reputation? Where should they start?

Almost half of patients today research their doctors online. So I would encourage each provider in a practice to have a social media presence. Chances are, patients will be Googling individual providers rather than the practice itself.

There are powerful social media tools providers can use to establish an online reputation. I’d start with LinkedIn, the professional social networking site. A LinkedIn profile is no more than a digital translation of one’s CV, and can be created in under an hour. If that’s all providers have time for, that’s OK. LinkedIn profiles tend to get ranked high on Google searches. But if providers have time to engage in other social media platforms, that’s even better, since that will expand their online presence and better define them on the web.

What would you say to someone in the health care field who has doubts on investing time in using social media for their practice?

These days, not worrying about an online reputation isn’t an option. Whether providers want one or not, they are already being defined online through physician rating sites. These sites search the web looking for publicly available information about doctors; they will create a profile page whether one is wanted or not. Of course, these sites also allow patients to rate physicians online.

If doctors don’t invest in social media, they risk being defined by rating sites.  And for many, that may not be the online impression they want.

In what ways could social media be used to improve a medical practice’s relationship with its patients?

Social media can make physicians more accessible to patients. Some hospitals arrange Twitter chats where their physicians can answer general medical questions from patients. (Note: These are not personal health questions, since social media isn’t the proper forum for that.) Answering these questions can tear down the health care walls that traditionally divide patient and provider, and better facilitate their connection.

Other practices use Facebook to reach an audience that they otherwise may have trouble reaching. Some OB/GYN practices use Facebook to provide patient education materials on safe sex or birth control to teenagers and young adults who comprise Facebook’s primary demographic.

Are there ways social media can hurt a practice’s online reputation? How should those managing their practice’s online presence respond to negativity?

Just as social media can define reputations online, it can also hurt them. Providers should be as professional online as they are in the exam room face to face with patients. Protecting patient privacy is crucial; whatever is posted online should be appropriate if said aloud in a crowded hospital elevator. And finally, consider online posts to be written in ink. Activity on the web can always be looked up in Google archives, even after posts are deleted.

Practices should respond to negativity (i.e. poor patient reviews) offline. Don’t get into arguments on the web; it’s unlikely to be resolved successfully. Instead, if there’s a dispute, post a standard message asking patients to call the office, where the practice can handle the situation privately, out of social media’s public eye.

 


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Amal Gadkari
Scoop.it!

The X Y Chart of Strategic Communications Performance « Results Map

The X Y Chart of Strategic Communications Performance « Results Map | Healthcare communications | Scoop.it
Ingenium Communications specializes in the art and science of communications and marketing strategy. We offer fully bilingual services in the areas of strategic communications and marketing planning.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Amal Gadkari from What's new in Visual Communication?
Scoop.it!

Pocket-sized printer creates documents by rolling across pages

Pocket-sized printer creates documents by rolling across pages | Healthcare communications | Scoop.it

This teardrop shaped portable Mini Mobile printer from Israeli studio Zuta Labs wirelessly prints documents from tablets, smartphones or PCs.


Via ECAL Library
Amal Gadkari's insight:

Interesting!

more...
No comment yet.