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Google Partners with Mayo Clinic to Improve Health-Related Search Content

Google Partners with Mayo Clinic to Improve Health-Related Search Content | Healthcare | Scoop.it
Google partners with Mayo Clinic for structured, curated, and verified health information information into its Knowledge Graph smart search algorithm.

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C. Todd Livengood's curator insight, February 11, 2015 2:30 PM

More proof that quality content is key. The cream of content always rises to the top.

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For Ebola Patients in Sierra Leone, Survival Takes More Than Medicine - Wired

For Ebola Patients in Sierra Leone, Survival Takes More Than Medicine - Wired | Healthcare | Scoop.it
For all the medicine they provide at this center, physicians and staff from Doctors Without Borders spend as much time encouraging the patients to eat, drink, and keep fighting.
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Surviving 2014: The Toughest Year in Healthcare | EMR and HIPAA

Surviving 2014: The Toughest Year in Healthcare | EMR and HIPAA | Healthcare | Scoop.it
The following is a guest blog post by Ben Quirk, CEO of Quirk Healthcare Solutions. How bad is 2014 for the healthcare industry? We’ve all read about ICD-10,

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Doctor Who: 9 Reasons Peter Capaldi Could Be The Best Doctor Ever - WhatCulture

Doctor Who: 9 Reasons Peter Capaldi Could Be The Best Doctor Ever - WhatCulture | Healthcare | Scoop.it
The Twelfth Doctor will go down in history.
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Physician communities’ map: reaching doctors in the virtual world

Physician communities’ map: reaching doctors in the virtual world | Healthcare | Scoop.it

The social media landscape is constantly evolving. Given the strong interest and comments received from our members, we have published an updated version of the map.

The proliferation of small and large communities is the result ofphysicians’ increasing need to share ideas and discuss clinical cases with colleagues in every part of the world. 
The analysis highlights a very complex social landscape, with a very strong community presence in the US, but also a significant presence of more or less large local communities almost worldwide.

The more the number of communities grow, the greater the need to create stronger niche communities, increasingly unfolding the landascape of physician communities. Trying to find some differentiating features in theaggregation trend of physician communities, we have identified 3 main features:

SpecialtyLocationTrustworthy Provider


Specialized communities

“Specialized” communities tend to be a smaller group and represent the long tail of physician communities, with a small but very specialized number of subscribers. In this type of aggregation the common feature is the professional specialty and consequently a common specific area of interest. In the radiology field, for example, there are many examples of specialized communities like Radrounds.com or Radiopolis.com.

Location specific communities

Location specific communities usually represent an aggregation of physicians that come from thesame country or speak the same language.

These kinds of communities are generally larger than the specialized ones, since they tend to include all physician specialities.

Usually physicians turn to location specific communities for two main reasons. The first is language, especially in Europe, where due to the multitude of different European languages, localized communities are proliferating quickly. The second is related to local roles and rules shared by physicians coming from the same country with regard to their medical or practice management issues.

Examples of localized communities are DocCheck in Germany and Doctors.net.uk in UK that represent the top European physician communities.

What is also interesting is the presence of physician communities in emerging markets. In China for example the dxy.cn community has 1,7 million members, of which 50% are physicians.

Trustworthy Provider based communities

The last (but not least) aggregation factor depends on the community provider's trustworthyness. Many physicians prefer to join communities related to scientific societies they belong to or trusted professional websites that they already consider relevant or reliable information sources. This explains the proliferation of physician communities within professional websites such as BMJ (doc2doc community) or related to medical association websites, such as CardioSource from the American College of Cardiology.

Usually these kinds of communities have a significant number of subscribers, largely also due to their existing physician databases.

The physician community landscape is continuously changing, but there is a trend towards growth of smaller communities, which are able to aggregate and keep active specialist interest groups. The true benchmark for measuring the quality and health of a community in this fragmented scenario will be to measure its social life - in order to understand how active each member really is, communicating, playing and sharing information and knowledge to create collective intelligence.


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Alexandre Gultzgoff's curator insight, January 5, 2015 5:44 AM

Physicians dedicated social networks raising up also in Europe....

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$2.6 million: Is the cost of becoming a doctor worth it?

$2.6 million: Is the cost of becoming a doctor worth it? | Healthcare | Scoop.it
Each year, over 20,000 U.S. students begin medical school. They routinely pay $50,000 or more per year for the privilege.

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Why Is Telemedicine Suddenly Hot?

Why Is Telemedicine Suddenly Hot? | Healthcare | Scoop.it
Google's recent announcement that it will provide telemedicine services was the crescendo to a swelling volume of recent interest. Telemedicine has been around for a generation. Why is this happening now? The new driving force is the rebirth of relationship medicine.

Via Philippe Marchal, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, Art Jones
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Art Jones's curator insight, November 2, 2014 8:02 PM

"Tele Medicine is expanding because broadband network coverage is improving, patients and doctors are more comfortable with computers, pressure for cost savings is increasing, and an emerging policy consensus favors telemedicine. This all makes sense. But, these forces have been at play for a decade or more and hence don’t account for the current inflection point (1) of interest in telemedicine.


The new driving force is the rebirth of relationship medicine. By “relationship medicine” I mean a paradigm of medical practice that puts the relationship between the patient and the doctor at the center. The most important relationship is with the primary care doctor, because that relationship is life-long, and the primary care doctor is most concerned with the patient’s total health status and long term prospects. This is how much of medicine was done in the 1950s, but it declined as Medicare and health insurers “industrialized” medicine, slicing doctors’ time finer and finer and putting patients on a medical assembly line that moves them past doctors for ever-shorter office visits. This echoes Henry Ford’s industrialization of car assembly.

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When will digital health go mainstream? When millennials are older and sicker

When will digital health go mainstream? When millennials are older and sicker | Healthcare | Scoop.it
A panel discussion on mobile health at IMPACT 2014 varied from when it will go mainstream, people's comfort level with data sharing and telemedicine adoption.

Via Gilles Jourquin, Anneliz Hannan
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A Mobile Health Innovation That Could Help Stop Ebola - Huffington Post

A Mobile Health Innovation That Could Help Stop Ebola - Huffington Post | Healthcare | Scoop.it
Developing countries don't have the high-tech equipment needed to quickly diagnose the disease, but they do have millions of cellphones. One UCLA professor has a way to turn those phones into diagnostic centers....

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What’s behind the dramatic rise in medical identity theft?

What’s behind the dramatic rise in medical identity theft? | Healthcare | Scoop.it
A decentralized U.S. health system, increasing digitization of records, and demand in the black market are fueling a surge in thefts.

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How to tell your digital health startups story in three minutes or less

How to tell your digital health startups story in three minutes or less | Healthcare | Scoop.it
How to tell your digital health startups story in three minutes or less
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Look at Health Care Trends, Growth to Research Online Nursing Programs - U.S. News & World Report

Look at Health Care Trends, Growth to Research Online Nursing Programs - U.S. News & World Report | Healthcare | Scoop.it
Students should make sure their online program offers some training in health informatics and telemedicine.
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Google Helpouts: The Virtual Future of Healthcare?

Google Helpouts: The Virtual Future of Healthcare? | Healthcare | Scoop.it
Could the future of healthcare be powered by virtual technologies?

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Prediction: Health wearables to save 1.3 million lives by 2020 | mobihealthnews

Prediction: Health wearables to save 1.3 million lives by 2020 | mobihealthnews | Healthcare | Scoop.it

Smart wearable devices may help save 1.3 million lives by 2020, according to a prediction made by Switzerland-based firm Soreon Research. According to the analyst group: “Smart wearables, a set of sensors attached to the body with a direct link to smart devices, are the most industry-disrupting innovation as well as a major opportunity to transform the healthcare system.”

The firm’s lives saved number is mostly accounting for reduction in mortality thanks to wearables employed for in-hospital monitoring, which will likely help save about 700,000 lives of the 1.3 million.

“New wearable technology can easily extend monitoring functions beyond the intensive care unit and alert medical professionals to any follow-on medical problems a patient may develop. Hundreds of thousands of lives could be saved as a result,” Pascal Koenig, Research Director at Soreon said in a statement. “Two other areas where innovative wearable healthcare products could have major benefits are cardiovascular conditions and obesity.”

Monitoring cardiovascular diseases with wearables could prevent 230,000 deaths, while obesity related deaths could be reduced by 150,000. 

“Smart wearables are in a fast-paced, exploratory phase, where the breadth of available solutions reflects their market potential,” Koenig said in the statement. “Soon patients with all different disorders will be using wearables for personalized diagnostics and full-time monitoring. Along with organizing their everyday lives, health data will be handled conveniently via a mobile device. Compared to existing health tracking options, these devices will be life guardians and their adoption rate will be enormous.”

Soreon believes that patients with chronic conditions will help drive the smart wearables market from $2 billion today to $41 billion by 2020.

Another separate report this week from TechNavio predicts that the global location-based services market for the healthcare industry will grow about 31 percent over the next four years.

The firm notes that real-time performance monitoring has become more popular in healthcare to increase hospital efficiency. Doctors, staff, and patients are using all kinds of wearable devices: pedometers, smart watches, and health monitors.

“In 2014, around 10 million units of wearable devices were sold worldwide and this number is expected to grow nearly tenfold in the coming years,” Faisal Ghaus, Vice President of TechNavio said in a statement. “The constant use of wearable devices in the healthcare industry is anticipated to reduce hospital costs by a significant amount over the next six years.”

 

 


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Pascal Malengrez e-ssencials digital health's curator insight, January 15, 2015 4:58 PM

10M wearables sold in 2014, i.e $2b moving to $41b by 2020, making preventive medicine soon a reality

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Healthcare taps cloud in record numbers | Healthcare IT News

Healthcare taps cloud in record numbers | Healthcare IT News | Healthcare | Scoop.it
Don't dismiss the healthcare industry as one of the last to innovate quite yet. When it comes to adopting cloud technology, it is ahead of the game, according to a new report.

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How Much Sleep Do Americans Trade for Work?

How Much Sleep Do Americans Trade for Work? | Healthcare | Scoop.it
Some Americans forgo a significant amount of sleep in order to make more time for commuting, socializing, and grooming—but most of all, working.

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Prominent Michigan Cancer Doctor Pleads Guilty: ‘I Knew That It Was Medically Unnecessary’

Prominent Michigan Cancer Doctor Pleads Guilty: ‘I Knew That It Was Medically Unnecessary’ | Healthcare | Scoop.it
Dr. Farid Fata, a prominent cancer doctor in Michigan, admitted in court to intentionally and wrongfully diagnosing healthy people with cancer. Fata also
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10 Wearables Totally Changing the Medical Industry

10 Wearables Totally Changing the Medical Industry | Healthcare | Scoop.it
These 10 medical wearables are about to significantly impact the future of breast cancer, smoking and more.

Via Adrian Adewunmi Ph.D, Technical Dr. Inc.
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Wearables Are Totally Failing the People Who Need Them Most | WIRED

Wearables Are Totally Failing the People Who Need Them Most | WIRED | Healthcare | Scoop.it
Fitness tracking companies need to start embracing the FDA and making devices and apps for the old, the chronically ill, and the poor.

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J R's curator insight, December 3, 2014 6:17 AM

Interessant!

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Find Out What Doctors Are Going To Do To You With These Video-Game-Inspired Graphics

Find Out What Doctors Are Going To Do To You With These Video-Game-Inspired Graphics | Healthcare | Scoop.it
Patients facing scary procedures can finally have a clue what their doctor is saying.

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Santé Digitale 's curator insight, November 3, 2014 3:49 AM

"Say you or a loved one are about to have a complex surgery. The doctor might draw you a sketch or direct you to an online diagram explaining what's going to happen. But these can be hard for non-medical professionals to understand, especially during times when it's hard to concentrate on anything (i.e. right before a surgery). A 3-D animation created using video game techniques, however, could be easier to grasp."

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On the fence about getting a flu shot? Doctors say get one now

On the fence about getting a flu shot? Doctors say get one now | Healthcare | Scoop.it
The answer to "When should I get a flu shot?" is easy: Right now.

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Which Industries Are Poised to Win the Future of Wearables?

Which Industries Are Poised to Win the Future of Wearables? | Healthcare | Scoop.it
There are still some folks around who remember outhouses and manual typewriters. But fewer and fewer, to be honest. Now we're in the zoom era of

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Study: People make a staggering number of mistakes when giving medicine to ... - Washington Post

Study: People make a staggering number of mistakes when giving medicine to ... - Washington Post | Healthcare | Scoop.it
The most common error: double-dosing.
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Digital Fingerprints Track Kids’ Health

Digital Fingerprints Track Kids’ Health | Healthcare | Scoop.it
A new study finds that children can be successfully followed by their fingerprints, making an electronic health registry feasible.

This is critical in the developing world, where 2.5 millio...
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Ebola In The United States: Fears vs. Facts

Ebola In The United States: Fears vs. Facts | Healthcare | Scoop.it
Stop panicking about a major Ebola outbreak in the United States – you’re in very good hands.
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