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4 Healthcare Brands That Are Using YouTube Right

4 Healthcare Brands That Are Using YouTube Right | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

With more than 1 billion users and 300 hours of video uploaded every minute, YouTube has clearly moved far beyond being simply a home for user-generated cat clips.

Yet many brands, especially healthcare brands, still haven’t fully embraced the network; in part this is because of lingering weariness, but the hesitancy is also rooted in not knowing exactly where to start.

 

Delay no longer. Thanks to a few pioneering brands, it has become clear over the past few years that YouTube is an excellent outlet for distributing healthcare-related content.

In particular, the four brands below are excellent models to follow for using the platform to build interest and engagement.

1. Cigna

An analysis by Performics last year found that Cigna gets the most views per video on YouTube of any major healthcare provider. What’s the secret to its success? Largely, that the company commits ad spend to serve its short pieces as pre-rolls before other YouTube videos.

While that may sound like cheating, it’s actually a great example of how to use YouTube right. Cigna has devoted time to developing specific digital short-form ads—the videos are around 15 to 20 seconds on average—and it’s targeting relevant content and audiences. In other words, the company is creating its YouTube videos with a very clear purpose in mind.

 

2. GE Healthcare

 

YouTube’s Creator Playbook for Brands constantly stresses the importance of developing engaging videos. Why? Because, as the guide puts it, “Compelling videos can bring in new viewers, introduce them to the rest of your content, and build a loyal fanbase.”

GE Healthcare does an excellent job of drawing audiences in by showing off its products in engaging ways. For example, this simple, but compelling, HD ultrasound piece has garnered 168,000 views.

 

3. Novartis

 

Life hacks are one of the staples of YouTube, with tens of thousands of videos on the platform explaining how to do everything from tying a tie to falling asleep better.

Earlier this year, Novartis smartly took this trope and used it for a much more serious purpose: highlighting creative ways to make everyday tasks simpler for people living with multiple sclerosis (MS). The “7 Small Life Hacks That Make a Big Difference” already has nearly 74,000 views.

 

4. CMN Hospitals

 

The patients at Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals often have inspiring and heartbreaking stories.

On its YouTube channel, the organization does an excellent job of highlighting some of these tales. The pieces range in topic and length (some go as long as 13 minutes), but all are presented beautifully and tastefully.

 


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Janet Vasil's curator insight, May 28, 8:18 AM

These are some great examples of how video is used in healthcare  marketing. Medical, health and wellness professionals and organizations have a wealth of appealing stories they can tell with video.  (I know because I produced thousands of patient-centered stories all over the country for a medical TV syndicator for more than a decade.)

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Wearables 2015: Defining digital medicine

Wearables 2015: Defining digital medicine | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Digital medicine is poised to transform biomedical research, clinical practice and the commercial sector. Here we introduce a monthly column from R&D/venture creation firm PureTech tracking digital medicine's emergence.

 

Technology has already transformed the social fabric of life in the twenty-first century. It is now poised to profoundly influence disease management and healthcare. Beyond the hype of the 'mobile health' and 'wearable technology' movement, the ability to monitor our bodies and continuously gather data about human biology suggests new possibilities for both biomedical research and clinical practice. Just as the Human Genome Project ushered in the age of high-throughput genotyping, the ability to automate, continuously record, analyze and share standardized physiological and biological data augurs the beginning of a new era—that of high-throughput human phenotyping.


These advances are prompting new approaches to research and medicine, but they are also raising questions and posing challenges for existing healthcare delivery systems. How will these technologies alter biomedical research approaches, what types of experimental questions will researchers now be able to ask and what types of training will be needed? Will the ability to digitize individual characteristics and communicate by mobile technology empower patients and enable the modification of disease-promoting behaviors; at the same time, will it threaten patient privacy? Will doctors be prescribing US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared apps on a regular basis, not just to monitor and manage chronic disease but also to preempt acute disease episodes? Will the shift in the balance between disease treatment and early intervention have a broad economic impact on the healthcare system? How will the emergence of these new technologies reshape the healthcare industry and its underlying business models? What will be the defining characteristics of 'winning' products and companies?


These are just some of the questions we plan to ask over the coming months. In the meantime, we introduce here some of the key themes shaping R&D in the digital medicine field and focus on what they might mean for the biopharmaceutical and diagnostic/device industries.


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Risto Suoknuuti's curator insight, May 17, 4:23 AM

Man made machines for mans use. Systems simplyfies after getting complex. This is the rule in the winning game.

Ed Crowley's curator insight, May 17, 8:30 AM

Wearable medical technology is quickly changing the potential for health research, and with IoT, health management. 

Be-Bound®'s curator insight, May 18, 9:54 AM

And this is just the beginning ! 

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Infographic: Geo-Located Social Media from Hospitals

Infographic: Geo-Located Social Media from Hospitals | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

Earlier in our Completing the Conversations series, we found that 93% of social media posts being shared on hospital grounds do not include the hospital name or relevant terms. Tools that rely on keywords and hashtags miss the important conversations occurring in hospitals--posts that celebrate life, thank the passionate medical staff, and more.

Using the Geofeedia platform, we were able to take a look at what's being posted in hospitals, focusing on overall trends like top keywords, overall themes and even the amount of posts per bed. 

A few highlights:

Patients and guests at Chicago's Northwestern Memorial Hospital broke the typical "gross hospital food" mold--they are fans of the menu!Common themes (and keywords) across the hospitals we monitored: "Love", "life", and "God".Most social activity: Dallas' Baylor University Medical.

 


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After Google, Apple Is The Next To Collect DNA Samples To Further Genetic Disease Studies

After Google, Apple Is The Next To Collect DNA Samples To Further Genetic Disease Studies | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
From Google to the U.S. government, efforts are being made to gain more knowledge about diseases and genetics Apple is joining the group too

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Richard Platt's curator insight, May 8, 6:57 PM

Apple is joining the growing list of companies and organizations interested in studying DNA. From Google to the U.S. government, efforts are being made to gain more knowledge about diseases and genetics is part of the focus. Efforts are geared towards learning more about diseases with the hope of combating debilitating disorders like Parkinson’s disease.  Apple in its efforts to facilitate better research on DNA, is about to begin its genetic databasing. What Apple wants to do is collect DNA from its various users through what has been described as a secure portal. The idea behind gathering DNA samples is part of Apple’s program that launched in March, known as the ResearchKit program. Those who volunteer their health information for the ResearchKit program will also benefit from being selected to participate in certain clinical studies.

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Pharma companies turn to social media to improve corporate reputations

Pharma companies turn to social media to improve corporate reputations | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

The report, which is based on data from 14 pharma companies taken over a three-month peroid, found the average number of tweets by has gone up by 530 per cent since 2013 while Twitter followers have increased by nearly 300 per cent. 

The study, 'Connecting the dots: Which Pharma Companies are Succeeding in the Social Media Space?', also showed that companies that keep their social networks fresh with regular updates have the highest interaction from the community and their followers.

Boehringer Ingelheim, Bayer, Novartis and Merck, stood out as as the best performing companies in terms of being active on their social network profiles and encouraging large numbers of users to engage with them.

Rebecca Canvin, social media manager at Ogilvy Healthworld, said: "We know that some pharma companies have been cautious in their approach to social media, but our report clearly demonstrates a dramatic and successful increase in activity. Social media has changed the way pharma companies communicate – it allows them to build corporate reputation and engage in genuine, meaningful conversations with audiences. For companies who want to stand out from the crowd it’s time to be brave, get personal, educate and integrate social media into their wider marketing strategy."

The report recommends that pharma companies should be prepared to have honest conversations about their brands by developing strategies and identifying potential scenarios where they can respond as quickly as possible to their followers. 

The report also suggests that companies should aim to have a clear set of engagement guidelines to help manage difficult questions.

 


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How Patients Use Digital Healthcare [Infographic]

How Patients Use Digital Healthcare [Infographic] | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

If you’re a healthcare provider, it’s important to pay attention to how people are using online resources to research and choose their caregivers. It may surprise you to know what a big role social media plays in their decision-making.

What U.S. adults consider when searching for healthcare online:

WebsitesSocial MediaHealth infoDoctor and Hospital recommendationsReviews and Ratings

Digital Healthcare Check-Up from National Research Corporation:


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EmmanuelGrunenberger's curator insight, April 29, 2:24 PM

I was expecting higher ratios although already 34% asked for medical advice. Shoudl increase with services like Boddy, health advisor

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Connecting The Dots: Which pharma companies are succeeding in the soc…

For the full report, please email pharmasocial@ogilvy.com
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How wearables and mobile health tech are reshaping clinical trials

How wearables and mobile health tech are reshaping clinical trials | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Guest The average cost of bringing a drug from development to FDA approval is over $2.5 billion. But if researchers can use wearable devices to grab insights early on in a drug trial, they can cut failure rates and reduce costs.

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Richard Platt's curator insight, April 20, 7:42 PM

The average cost of bringing a drug from development to FDA approval is over $2.5 billion, according to a recent study by The Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development. This figure includes costs for the drugs that don’t make it through to the approval phase, and the Tufts Center notes that higher drug failure rates contribute significantly to increases in R&D costs.  -  But there’s a big opportunity here: If life science companies can get enough insight early in development, they can create a more efficient drug development process and prioritize resources for the most promising therapies. Big data analytics and new clinical technology — such as mobile health solutions and wearable devices — promise to significantly change how trials are conducted and increase the value of the data and insights that come out of these trials.  -  Advancements in computing power and predictive analytics tools enable us to process vast amounts of information and develop insights in mere seconds. Technology’s role is to bring together disparate data sources so the industry can share data and use advanced analytics to make better decisions — all with the goal of getting effective drugs to market faster.

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How the IoT can speed up health delivery

How the IoT can speed up health delivery | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
In the 1966 film Fantastic Voyage, miniaturised doctors in a tiny submarine are implanted in a patient’s body to cure a bloodclot. Today, reality has caught up with science fiction. Instead of a submarine, however, tiny sensors can be swallowed that

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Richard Platt's curator insight, April 7, 1:15 PM

The internet of things (physical objects that, when equipped with sensors, can collect and transmit information) will allow all patients to receive the kind of real-time monitoring once reserved only for urgent cases in specialist wards.  -  Now, this level of surveillance can be used in other parts of a hospital or outside it. “Once you have sensors that are medical-grade and miniaturised, you get a lot of data that wasn’t looked at in the past,” says Thierry Leclercq, president of GE Healthcare’s Life Care Solutions business.

For those with long-term conditions, this means moving away from sporadic health checks during hospital or clinic visits to constant monitoring.  -  C Martin Harris, chief information officer at the US’s Cleveland Clinic, cites diabetes as an example of a condition where technology can help. “Twenty years ago, you came into the lab, you had blood drawn and we looked at the value and made a decision on your treatment plan,” he says. Treatment plans can now be adjusted much more swiftly.  -  Moreover, large volumes of data should help inform decisions about broader healthcare strategies.

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PR to pharma: up your dosage of social media

PR to pharma: up your dosage of social media | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

Many pharma companies remain concerned about running afoul of the regulators with their online activities and therefore have not yet fully embraced new channels. However, increasingly patients want and expect them to engage, and those that have are reaping the rewards.

An IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics report last year asked the provocative question, 'Is healthcare ready for empowered and digitally demanding patients?'

Well, is it?

Consumers today are social beings. Research has found that the average American goes to the doctor three times a year, but spends 52 hours online searching for health information. They want this information fast and are willing to consult a wide array of sources, including friends and family, social media, news outlets, blogs, Wikipedia, pharma company websites, and everything in between.

Younger consumers, the most tech-savvy, are also "among the most health conscious of any age cohort" according to Lisa Stockman, president, global public relations and medical communications, inVentiv Health. That has implications for pharma. As Stockman says, "Consumer fascination in preventative health management tells us pharmaceutical companies must adopt new strategies."

Out with the old, in with the new

Pharma companies have long relied on traditional public relations tactics to communicate with patients, including media outreach, partnerships with third-party patient advocacy groups, and event sponsorships. Although these tactics remain critical, they are no longer enough.



"The days when patients considered the ability to connect with you directly a 'nice-to-have' are gone"

 

Chris Iafolla, head of inVentiv Health PR Group's digital and social strategy practice, relates that, "The days when patients considered the ability to connect with you directly a 'nice-to-have' are gone; they now expect it. The democratisation of media has made that possible. It is now possible to change the model from a one-way communication to a two-way dialogue and to involve your audience in a discussion."

No room for inaction

So why have so few pharma companies broken through using social media? As a recent Forbes article observes, 'among the 50 largest companies, half still do not use social media to engage consumers or patients,' and only 10 of these 50 have made use of Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook, the top three social media channels.

Clearly companies remain concerned about running afoul of US FDA regulators, and for that reason have not yet fully embraced new channels. When the FDA released long-awaited guidelines about the communication of health information via social media, it seemed to take a fairly restrictive stance, requiring that companies communicate information about risks and benefits in any social media message.

While staying within bounds remains a critical concern, it need not, should not, and in today's environment, cannot prevent pharma companies from engaging deeply in social media. One recent Accenture study found that patients expect digital communication from pharma companies, seeking information around issues related to their treatment. Pharma needs to sustain more meaningful and more intimate conversations with patients and, in the case of younger patients in particular, needs to help satisfy patient yearnings to understand the companies behind the products they consume.



"Pharma companies must put aside their fears and develop a new strategy for engaging with patients"

 


Pharma companies must put aside their fears and develop a new strategy for engaging with patients. "Inaction is not the answer," notes Tim Bird, CEO of Cooney Waters Unlimited. Social channels should be used to educate and empower patients and advocacy groups.

Laying the groundwork

Companies seeking to wade more deeply into social might begin by analysing how their existing social media presence stacks up against that of their closest competitors. As Helene Ellison, chair, global healthcare practice of Burson-Marsteller notes, "Competitive benchmarking helps make a case for certain social media platforms, but the real value comes when our research delivers insights that help us find social media strategies that can be integrated across marketing and communications."

It's also important to take the time to really understand the audience you're targeting. JeanAnn Morgan, managing director at Burson-Marsteller, recounts how, in devising a programme to target patients with chronic disease, her client first spent time understanding "the triggers that drive better disease management and a therapy's role in impacting a patient's daily life".

The communications team discovered that community played a greater role than was previously thought. Burson-Marsteller's research found that 93 per cent of advocacy community members used the Internet for health information and disease management, while 71 per cent of patients were actively engaged on social media. With online community support, patients with this condition felt empowered to care for themselves more energetically. This and other insights led to an effective patient engagement programme that built community and enhanced awareness around the disease.

Likewise, JPA Health Communications partnered with the Melanoma Research Foundation (MRF) to enhance their digital content and boost online community offerings. Responding to numerous melanoma patients seeking information and peer support, JPA monitored the MRF's website and social media analytics to deliver the 'MRF community central', a key portal for patients, caregivers, family and friends. Overall, the MRF's redesigned website, Melanoma.org, made information and support more accessible for melanoma patients. Patients responded enthusiastically, and traffic on Melanoma.org saw a significant uptick.

Strategies for success

To excel at social media, create meaningful content that adds value and that can be shared and cited. Drive discussion and dialogue while always complying with government regulations. Provide targeted, channel-specific messaging to various audience segments and use visual communications like video and infographics wherever possible.

One successful ongoing campaign, Parkinson's More Than Motion, is an interactive Facebook community campaign developed by Cooney Waters and its client UCB to reach people with Parkinson's disease and their caregivers. This reality-style video and interactive content-rich series, now in its third year, informs patients about the importance of recognising and treating both the motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. More than 75,000 fans have watched these videos. Educational tools and ongoing content and communications keep them actively engaged and coming back for more.






In some sense, the communications challenges posed by social media are not new. The discipline of public relations has always focused on communicating messages through earned trust rather than paid messages. Likewise, the imperative to sustain honest, authentic conversations with consumers has always existed, irrespective of regulations. New social media technologies simply allow interactions to happen more fluidly and dynamically.

Don't let fear of the unknown prevent you from meeting today's patients where they are. They're out there, waiting for a conversation. Are you up to the challenge?

 


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Are Mobile Medical Apps Good for Our Health? A New Study by Research Now Reveals That Doctors and Patients Say 'Yes'

Are Mobile Medical Apps Good for Our Health? A New Study by Research Now Reveals That Doctors and Patients Say 'Yes' | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
PLANO, TX--(Marketwired - Mar 17, 2015) - The study, revealed today, looks into the use of mobile health apps1, and assesses their potential in healthcare. Digital data collection provider, Research Now, spoke to 500 healthcare professionals2 and 1,000 health app users in the U.S. The survey asked healthcare professionals whether...
Tanja Juslin's insight:

Apps are coming to improve our lives. Thanks for Klick Health for the nicely captured set in their weekly digital health news: http://www.klick.com/health/author/KlickWire/ ;

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FDA to pharma: Watch out for unapproved Facebook claims

FDA to pharma: Watch out for unapproved Facebook claims | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

Dive Brief:

RAPS' Alec Gaffney notes that the FDA has issued six warning letters to six different companies for posting unapproved claims on their Facebook pages in the last six months.The unapproved claims occurred not only as part of posting, but also in the "About" section.February 2015 was the highest level of Facebook regulatory oversight (in the form of warning letters) ever. 

Dive Insight:

Last summer, the FDA released draft guidance on social media policy, opening the door for pharma companies to use social media channels more effectively, while also signaling that greater regulatory oversight would be forthcoming. Not only has the FDA been policing Facebook, but also looking at tweets from pharma companies as well. As Thomas Abrams, director of the FDA Office of Prescription Drug Promotion, has noted, the FDA's social media policy is evolving. 

According to a blog post from Abrams last summer, "FDA sees social media as an important resource for industry and is committed to developing additional guidance for drug and device manufacturers that outline the agency’s current thinking," he wrote. "We do all of this work with the best interest of patients in mind."

 


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New system for detecting adverse effects of medications using social media - Medical Xpress

New system for detecting adverse effects of medications using social media - Medical Xpress | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Researchers at Carlos III Universidad de Madrid have developed a system for detecting adverse effects of pharmaceutical drugs by tracking information generated by patients on specialized blogs or social networks such as Twitter in real time.

Via HaBIc
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Lot's of possibilities in here.

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Putting Data To Work To Improve Health

Putting Data To Work To Improve Health | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Putting Data To Work To Improve Health

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Devon Slack's curator insight, May 27, 4:26 AM

This article goes over the importance, effects, and development of health data, as well as how people can help advance it. The goal of Health Datapalooza is too aid in furthering this movement by connecting and inspiring those leading the charge.

It connects to unit 1 of human geography in that the article shows the importance of  sources of geographical information and ideas. Online data and census data especially have become reachable by those with Internet access.

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Which pharma companies are succeeding in the social media space?

Which pharma companies are succeeding in the social media space? | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

A new report published by Ogilvy Healthworld (part of Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide) has shed some light on the pharma companies that are leading the way in integrated social media strategies.

“The pharmaceutical industry is becoming increasingly reliant on social media as a key platform for communicating with multiple stakeholders,” states the report.

With the average number of tweets by pharma companies increasing by 530 percent since 2013 and Twitter followers increasing by nearly 300 percent, it’s no surprise that more and more companies are seeing the value of incorporating social media in their marketing strategies.

The group analyzed the social media activity of 14 pharma companies across 10 social networks and reviewed a week of activity per month over three months.

What they found was that a small group of companies are “connecting the dots” and leading the way in social media by providing meaningful content that actively engages their audiences.

 

Boehringer Ingelheim was noted as the leader in this regard, being the first pharma company to fully engage with social media and the concept of digital health.

Bayer, Novartis, Johnson & Johnson and Merck also performed well in the report.

The pharma companies that were singled out as needing to catch up included GlaxoSmithKline, Roche, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Novo Nordisk, as well as Lilly, Sanofi, AstraZeneca and Pfizer.

Ogilvy advised pharma companies searching for a social media strategy to aim to provide content that is relevant to their audience and have a clear set of engagement guidelines.

“Social media has changed the way pharma communicates—it allows companies to build corporate reputation and engage in genuine, meaningful conversations with audiences,” said Rebecca Canvin, social media manager for Ogilvy Healthworld. “For pharma companies who want to stand out from the crowd, it’s time to be brave, get personal, educate and integrate social media into their wider marketing strategy.”

 


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New video game imitates symptoms of Alzheimer's

New video game imitates symptoms of Alzheimer's | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

The heavy chime of a clock wakes you in a vaguely familiar living room. Scattered keepsakes on tables drop hints at the people who have passed through here, but you can't quite piece them together. The photos hanging on the walls capture smiling faces you don't wholly recognize, even if one of them is yours.

 

This is the opening scene of Forget-Me-Knot, a new video game that puts its players in the shoes of someone battling Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Alexander Tarvet, a student in Abertay University's Game Design & Production Management program in Dundee, Scotland, aims to use the game to raise awareness of the brain disease, in which a person's memory, thinking and problem-solving skills progressively worsen over time


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You tended to remember...

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Top L.A. hospital using HealthKit to monitor 80,000 patients

Top L.A. hospital using HealthKit to monitor 80,000 patients | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

Apple’s ambitions as a mobile health company took a giant leap forward over the weekend, as HealthKit was connected to more than 80,000 patient files at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

This means that Cedars-Sinai doctors now have the ability to take iOS Health data into account when making clinical and medical judgments — allowing physicians to easily access patients’  weight, blood pressure, steps taken, glucose levels, and oxygen saturation levels as gathered from their iOS devices.

 

Speaking with Bloomberg, Cedars-Sinai’s chief information officer Darren Dworkin described it as something of an experiment.

“We don’t really, fully know and understand how patients will want to use this and we’re going to basically stand ready to learn by what will happen,” he said.

 


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Pharma's getting savvier about social, with Boehringer, Bayer leading the pack

Pharma's getting savvier about social, with Boehringer, Bayer leading the pack | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

Bigger isn't necessarily better when it comes to social media. But bigger is certainly better than drugmakers were doing a couple of years ago. Some companies are actually getting it right now, Ogilvy Healthworld says.

 

A small group of drugmakers are "connecting the dots," according to Ogilvy's latest audit of pharma's social media efforts. They're getting patients, doctors and the media interested, delivering relevant info, inspiring actual conversations.

 

A very small group, actually. Just 5 companies out of 14 that Ogilvy investigated. We'll get to those later. First, let's consider the fact that pharma's social media presence has grown--a lot. Drugmakers have 1.3 million Facebook followers, Ogilvy says. The average number of pharma tweets per week has gone up by 530% since 2013. The number of Twitter followers has tripled, to 790,000. Four companies even have Vine accounts.

"We know that some pharma companies have been cautious in their approach to social media, but our report clearly demonstrates a dramatic and successful increase in activity," Rebecca Canvin, social media manager at Ogilvy Healthworld, said in a release.

Some have been more successful than others, of course. To go from size to success, Ogilvy looked at more stats--how many followers, how frequent the updates, how many social accounts, how often posts or tweets were shared. The auditors also gauged interest--how much did followers care about a company's social chatter?

Which company came out on top won't be a surprise to those who keep an eye on such things: Boehringer Ingelheim, already a leading presence in 2013, took that lead much further. The German drugmaker's score almost doubled that of its closest rival, Bayer. And Bayer, in turn, bested third-place Novartis ($NVS) by an easy margin.

The remaining two companies "connecting the dots" were Merck ($MRK) and Johnson & Johnson ($JNJ), both of which made big leaps from 2013. In fact, all of the top 5 multiplied their social presences significantly.

Four other drugmakers have made some strides and some connections since Ogilvy's last audit. The rest are still doing the social thing at a beginner level--broadcasting content without engaging much at all, the audit showed.

It's a good thing for them that Ogilvy analyzed their successful peers to come up with some tips for improvement. "[I]t's time to be brave, get personal, educate and integrate social media into their wider marketing strategy," Canvin said.

But why? As the current experts at Boehringer told Ogilvy, the conversation is already out there. "People are talking about you, whether you're active or not," said Patricia Alves, Boehringer's social media and community manager. "Social media gives you the opportunity to engage in that conversation, to give your position and your statement, and maybe then hopefully change the opinion of one person or two."

- check out the Ogilvy Healthworld statement


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Apple ResearchKit: Three Reasons For Pharma To Be Optimistic

Apple ResearchKit: Three Reasons For Pharma To Be Optimistic | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
At Apple’s much-anticipated Watch launch event in San Francisco yesterday they delivered what was largely a surprise announcement. For months there has been speculation about the Watch and its possible implications and applications for health. Recently these expectations had been diminished by leaked reports of greatly scaled back integrated sensor technology..

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What is the role of social media in healthcare?

What is the role of social media in healthcare? | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

While social media is moving quickly through the “hype” line it can serve as an important source of information from people who are researching health information online.  In the latest research update we found that people are in fact relying on social media for information, but there is a lot of “trust but verify”.  The key finding is that although patients still trust their doctors they want a better relationship with physicians and they want more face to face time.

The research, just concluded, was for a startup here in the Boston area and I have permission to share top findings.  The research consisted of qualitative (5 cities, 64 people) and quantitative (n=1,254).  Please not thatquant research subjects were compensated with a Starbucks card.

Objective: Determine the extent to which online health seekers are using social media to make healthcaredecisions.

Participants: Online health seekers (gone online for health information within last 90 days and at least 4-6 times in the last year.

Key Findings:

(1) There is mistrust in the messenger when it comes to pharma health information-Although most said they have gone to a pharma product website most sites did not meet all their informational needs and the audience felt that they were trying to be “sold”.  They want to be able to see a list of competitive medications without having to research them online so that they can compare benefit/cost/side effects.

(2) People 30 or younger tended to rely on social media more for health information and connect with others to ask specific information about drug side effects, costs and dosage recommendations.  People 40+ used social media forhelp and support.

(3) Social media is becoming more important in filling the missing pieces for health information, more specifically others experiences especially around negative side effects.  It can both influence whether a patient fills an Rx and is compliant, but it varies by health condition.

 

(4) Patients want and need a “trusted source” to ask key health questions.  As some indicated “I just don’t know who to ask when I want a question answered. I don’t have the time to spend all day searching for answers”.

(5) Very few people actually trust the information they find on social media.  For example, if someone reads about a side effect mentioned on Twitter they are most likely to “want to know more” and “how this could affect me?”.

(6) If a health website has a relationship with pharma patients are more likely to be skeptical of health information on that site.  “They’re not going to tell me the truth if they rely on a drug company for their profits”. A health site needs to be more transparent when it comes to their relationship with pharma companies.

(7) An online community is very much desired for caregivers/patients with chronic conditions and most said they would read the information posted by others, even if on pharma website.

(8) The more serious the health condition, the more time spent online researching health information. Patients want to know “how is this going to affect the quality of MY life”.

(9) Peer to peer social media, health information is most desired, not communication from a pharma company.  However, patients were receptive to pharma posting information about updating health information, clinical trials or “in the news”.  It’s about informing them first so they don’t have to spend the time researching themselves.

In summary, social media use by patients in evolving as people evolve their use of social media. There is still a high level of mistrust of “big pharma” but there is also more trust of smaller biotech companies that are delivering new classes of drugs.

 


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Bientôt un diagnostic médical avec son smartphone

Bientôt un diagnostic médical avec son smartphone | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Des chercheurs ont mis au point un biocapteur qui permet de diagnostiquer rapidement certaines maladies. Une application pour téléphone peut ainsi détecter, grâce à des images prises par le...

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J-L Navarro's curator insight, April 14, 9:11 AM

#Diagnostic #médical à distance ! Comme quoi, un #smartphone, ça peut être utile pour plein d'autres choses que... téléphoner !

Vitalliance's curator insight, May 7, 6:45 AM

Encore une bonne raison supplémentaire de se mettre au #smartphone #senior

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Social Media is the Profound Change Fueling the e-Patient World

Social Media is the Profound Change Fueling the e-Patient World | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

This post is about an issue I plan to address during my visit at Mayo Clinic: the changing role of the patient and how that change is significantly powered by social media. Creating the best possible future for both patients and clinicians depends on our understanding this clearly and formally, so we can agree about what’s possible, and then practice health and care accordingly.

TransformationKnowledgeThe image at right is an updated version of a slide I’ve used for years. First published by MCCSM Advisory Board member Lucien Engelen – in 2010! – this visionary graphic illustrates how the internet has altered the flow of information.

When many of us were growing up, knowledge flowed within a truly closed system, but today it’s an open network of networks. Social media functions the way capillaries do in the body: information can flow around without centralized control. What was once never possible, is now essential. (See this simplified 50 second animated version of the diagram, first published by the BMJ.)

To understand this new future for patients and clinicians, we have to rethink things…and I don’t just mean technologically.

Most patients still don’t realize they can make real and valuable contributions, so, naturally, they haven’t worked at sharpening those skills. Nor do most clinicians realize that patient contributions and perspectives can be genuinely useful.

Still, there’s new and ever-emerging evidence that the medical establishment is accepting this movement toward enhanced patient collaboration. In 2012, in its report, Best Care at Lower Cost, the Institute of Medicine identified this as one of the four pillars of a learning healthcare system:

Patient/Clinician Partnerships
Engaged, empowered patients – A learning healthcare system is anchored on patient needs and perspectives and promotes the inclusion of patients, families, and other caregivers as vital members of the continuously learning care team.

And this is why I’ve announced my plan to kick off a formal project to explore a key question: Is it time for us to define a new science of patient engagement? More specifically:

Can we formally, methodically, rigorously identify what patients can now contribute to conversations about diagnosis and treatment that wasn’t possible or permissible in the past?
Can we figure out why in some cases patient engagement leads to real improvements in outcomes and costs, while in others it fails?
People have a tendency sometimes to speak of social media as if it were a magical universe inside of which amazing things happen, but nobody’s sure quite what or how.

I want to encourage people to think in concrete, specific terms about how valuable information truly flows to where it’s needed, because that is what makes new things possible – especially what makes possible the world of informed, empowered, engaged e-patients who truly are partners with the medical professionals.

 


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Do Cancer Patients Tweet? Examining the Twitter Use of Cancer Patients in Japan

Do Cancer Patients Tweet? Examining the Twitter Use of Cancer Patients in Japan | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

ABSTRACTBackground: Twitter is an interactive, real-time media that could prove useful in health care. Tweets from cancer patients could offer insight into the needs of cancer patients.

Objective: The objective of this study was to understand cancer patients’ social media usage and gain insight into patient needs.

Methods: A search was conducted of every publicly available user profile on Twitter in Japan for references to the following: breast cancer, leukemia, colon cancer, rectal cancer, colorectal cancer, uterine cancer, cervical cancer, stomach cancer, lung cancer, and ovarian cancer. We then used an application programming interface and a data mining method to conduct a detailed analysis of the tweets from cancer patients.

Results: Twitter user profiles included references to breast cancer (n=313), leukemia (n=158), uterine or cervical cancer (n=134), lung cancer (n=87), colon cancer (n=64), and stomach cancer (n=44). A co-occurrence network is seen for all of these cancers, and each cancer has a unique network conformation. Keywords included words about diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments for almost all cancers. Words related to social activities were extracted for breast cancer. Words related to vaccination and support from public insurance were extracted for uterine or cervical cancer.

Conclusions: This study demonstrates that cancer patients share information about their underlying disease, including diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments, via Twitter. This information could prove useful to health care providers.


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EmmanuelGrunenberger's curator insight, March 23, 1:11 PM

An example of observing how patients communicate about their diseases using social media... even in Japan.

Kathi Apostolidis's curator insight, March 24, 8:06 AM

Japanese cancer patients or those tweeting in Japanese may share information about their cancer experience on twitter, as is also the case in USA and

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ResearchKit : Apple impose la transparence aux chercheurs

ResearchKit : Apple impose la transparence aux chercheurs | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Avec ResearchKit, Apple donne aux chercheurs la possibilité d'intégrer des millions de cobayes à leurs recherches médicales, en conservant un protocole fiable. Mais les

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Tanja Juslin's insight:

New and easy way of collecting survey data for research.

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Could Video Games Be Used To Improve Youth Health? - Forbes

Could Video Games Be Used To Improve Youth Health? - Forbes | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Video games can sometimes be associated with a sedentary lifestyle and unhealthy weight gain.  A new study led by researchers at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services (SPHHS) suggests that certain games could...

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Emlyn Davies-Cole's curator insight, March 24, 10:36 AM

Video games just as good as any other Physical Education activity.

Justin Tu's curator insight, March 25, 11:36 PM

Daniel. T,  2013, 'Could Video Games be Used to Improve Youth Health?', Article of Forbes. 

Daniel explains in this article that E-games could provide more exercise than physical education for kids in middle school. The author provides that the studies from George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services demonstrate the ability in using video games to provide an attractive energy-burning P.E.. Their research focuses on 'Exer-games', where middle school students get on the video game 'Dance Dance Revolution' and has proven to burn more calories over traditional P.E. activities. The article is useful, it provides details on how video games benefit people's fitness, however the main limitation is that Daniel's article does not provide studies or information on how this affects adult fitness through video games. It'll be further researched to discover whether video games can be a useful alternative way of exercise.