Healthcare and pharma in social media
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How pharma and patient advocacy groups can become in sync

How pharma and patient advocacy groups can become in sync | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

At next month’s Patient Summit Europe (19-20 October, London) find out how you can be more than a trusted partner – get yourself on the same side as your patients, and deliver sophisticated advocacy that fights their cause.

Patient advocacy groups and pharma companies have the same ultimate goal – better health outcomes – but managing these relationships needs care on both sides.

To give you an insight into the level of discussion you can expect at the summit, we spoke with:
- Nisith Kumar, Director, Global Patient Affairs, Pfizer
- Ann Kwong, Founder and CEO, TREK Therapeutics
- Lynn Bartnicki, Patient advocate, Living Beyond Breast Cancer

Read the article ‘Dancing to the same tune?’ here: https://goo.gl/hgVVms
Kind regards,
Cintia Hernandez Marco


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rob halkes's curator insight, September 13, 8:27 AM

“Some drug companies are really focused on patients, and some don’t have a clue.” Lynn Bartnicki, patient advocate

- a quote from the report of Eyeforpharma.

Good to see some words from pharma and patient advocates published.

Even better to follow and read one of the many publications about the pharma and patient groups' relations: a trying but difficult engagement

You can look at the patient perspective in "pharma corporate reputations",

or overviews of the patient movement. A study about pharma and the connected patient. And above all: check your own credibility as a pharma company in the eyes of patients: your bespoke data on your company, for its different affiliations and therapy areas, based on 6 years of global data on corporate reputation in the perspective of patients and patient groups.

rob halkes's curator insight, September 13, 8:41 AM

“Some drug companies are really focused on patients, and some don’t have a clue.” Lynn Bartnicki, patient advocate

- a quote from the report of Eyeforpharma.

Good to see some words from pharma and patient advocates published.

Even better to follow and read one of the many publications about the pharma and patient groups' relations: a trying but difficult engagement

You can look at the patient perspective in "pharma corporate reputations", or at overviews of the patient movement. 

A study about pharma and the connected patient. And above all: check your own credibility as a pharma company in the eyes of patients: your bespoke data on your company, for its different affiliations and therapy areas, based on 6 years of global data on corporate reputation in the perspective of patients and patient groups.

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Healthcare Professionals’ Social Networks The Beginning of the End of Pharma Marketing as We Know it?

Healthcare Professionals’ Social Networks The Beginning of the End of Pharma Marketing as We Know it? Len Starnes Head of Digital Marketing & Sales General Med…


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How Cleveland Clinic connects with patients via social media

How Cleveland Clinic connects with patients via social media | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
The Cleveland Clinic also has a substantial base on social media and has been on Facebook since 2008 and now has about two million Facebook followers.

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Social Media And Ethical Concerns For Healthcare Professionals

Social Media And Ethical Concerns For Healthcare Professionals | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
While social media use in healthcare has the potential to bring value to patient-provider relationships, it is not without its ethical and professional challenges. This presentation looks at those challenges and suggests ways to deal with them.

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Art Jones's curator insight, August 29, 11:53 AM

Risk vs. Reward

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Twitter Moments: How Healthcare Organizations can Improve Marketing ROI in 2017

Twitter Moments: How Healthcare Organizations can Improve Marketing ROI in 2017 | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

Last year, Twitter opened its storytelling feature called “Twitter Moments” to the public to encourage the sharing of stories and news globally. With this capability, brands as well as individuals can share and create their own stories, using tweets and multimedia that have been uploaded onto the channel. By prioritizing short, succinct, digestible pieces of content, Twitter is attempting to compete with other digital storytelling giantssuch as Snapchat and Instagram. Twitter, reporting 317 million monthly users, is pushing digital boundaries in hopes of staying ahead of the competitive curve. For healthcare organizations, this feature has the potential to dramatically improve marketing ROI: “Twitter Moments just leverages what Twitter is already about, which is real-time marketing,” notes Rebecca Lieb, a digital media and marketing analyst quoted in a recent AdWeek article.

All digital channels are now recognizing the importance of succinct storytelling, whether it’s a healthcare CEO sharing inspiration for their company’s future via a LinkedIn post, or a hospital taking a video of their new pediatric wing on Facebook, it’s all aimed at one thing: providing audiences with content that they want, when they want it and how they want it. With the 24/7 news cycle and instantaneous social media world we live in, it’s sink or swim in this brave new digital world. How did Twitter announce the details of its new feature? By publishing their own Twitter moment of course.  

Below are a few ways Twitter Moments can help healthcare organizations improve their marketing ROI in 2017:

Showcase the value of your brand. For example, a healthcare client of SPR’s crafted a moment in order to highlight the value of physician assistants, including tweets with statistics around the growth of the profession over the last five years. Not only is this a great way to tell a story, but it emphasizes a mutual sharing of information and visuals around a topic.Engage with your brand advocates and followers. A best practice in social media marketing today is to share your follower’s content and with Twitter Moments, you can do just that. By sharing your audience’s content/tweets, your healthcare organization will build a deeper level of trust, signaling to your audience that the organization is paying attention and listening to what’s being said about the brand/topic/issue.Shape your healthcare brand’s reputation and messaging. Where anyone can leave a comment anywhere, at any time, brands are monitoring constantly to make sure they stay on their central messaging points as well as maintain their reputation because it doesn’t take much on social media to sully a brand’s reputation. With Twitter Moments, a healthcare organization can put out a particular perspective on a topic/story and control the messaging around it, sharing only the information that they want to.

According to a recent AdWeek article, even Twitter’s competitor YouTube eagerly jumped on board to use the Moments feature. By crafting a Twitter Moment to promote its custom series, YouTube Red Originals, engagement rates doubled compared to the engagement rates it achieved for its promoted Twitter trendwhich cost the company more than $100,000. Using the same content, Twitter Moments is the less expensive of the two options that ends up producing better results.

Twitter Moments are not solely for individuals and brands, however – media outlets are publishing Twitter Moments to curate and share news in real time. For example, executive editor at Newsweek Margarita Noriega produced a Twitter Moment detailing what happens when President-elect Trump attacks journalists online. She points out that it’s an opportunity to share information in real-time, noting that many fellow outlets are missing out on a huge opportunity to engage with their audiences on trending topics and news.  

For healthcare organizations today attempting to stay on top of their digital game, it’s crucial that they consider using Twitter Moments to tell their brand’s story in order to engage with key stakeholders and followers.


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MIT & GlaxoSmithKline launch flu tracking app Flumoji

MIT & GlaxoSmithKline launch flu tracking app Flumoji | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline and MIT Connection Science have launched a new flu app called Flumoji to help users track symptoms & share that information with researchers working to improve disease surveillance.

Cases of the flu have increased nationally as the season begins to hit its usual peak. Tracking the activity of such an ubiqutious disease can help public health officials guide limited resources to the areas where they could get the most bang for their buck.

We’ve seen interesting uses of digital health for flu tracking in recent years, ranging from medical apps to guide flu treatment to the use of social media and internet searches to track activity. Flumoji is an Android app that includes educational material about the flu as well as symptom tracking features, which includes collection of data already being captured by the phone:

…the Flumoji app tracks a variety of real-time data from a user’s phone in order to detect fluctuations in a user’s activity levels, social levels, and general routine. These fluctuations are used to predict whether a user is experiencing a flu-like outbreak. Real-time data is only collected during the flu season.

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The Benefits of Twitter for Scientists » American Scientist

The Benefits of Twitter for Scientists » American Scientist | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
The Benefits of Twitter for Scientists

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Gilbert C FAURE's curator insight, January 19, 11:52 AM
usage of twitter is indeed growing to circulate information, and why not teach and learn
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The Digital Patient Journey

The Digital Patient Journey | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
KEY TAKEAWAY: We can’t assume that being an empowered patient is a positive experience. Many patients enter a maze of online health information, coupled with managing appointments with multip…

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Big Tech And Pharma Bet On Cancer Therapy Startups: Celgene, Novartis, Pfizer, and Google’s Investments

Big Tech And Pharma Bet On Cancer Therapy Startups: Celgene, Novartis, Pfizer, and Google’s Investments | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Celgene has backed more than 15 companies since 2012. Google Ventures joined the list of top investors this year.

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Pharma On Instagram

Pharmaguy’s Select List of Big Pharma Companies with Corporate Instagram Accounts


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PatientView's curator insight, November 4, 2016 6:46 AM

Pharma engaging with soical media @pharmaguy

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The Power of Healthcare Storytelling | Klick Health

The Power of Healthcare Storytelling | Klick Health | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Big data has revealed the basic emotional arcs of stories, reinforcing what we’ve known all along—that great marketing is great storytelling. Let'
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The power of words when you know how to put it right.
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Greater use of digital health can be a 'game-changer' for asthma care

Greater use of digital health can be a 'game-changer' for asthma care | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
In a report published today the charity said that technology delivered via smartphones, including ‘smart inhalers’, apps that help individuals avoid triggers and remote monitoring, would revoluntionise asthma care and ease pressure on the NHS.The report, Connected asthma: how technology will transform care, said immediate action should be taken to ensure every person with asthma has an action plan available to them digitally. These action plans should eventually be incorporated into shared patient records.
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GSK starts RA trial on Apple ResearchKit, advancing industry use of iPhone-run studies | FierceBiotech

GSK starts RA trial on Apple ResearchKit, advancing industry use of iPhone-run studies | FierceBiotech | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
GlaxoSmithKline has taken the plunge and set up a clinical trial running on Apple’s ResearchKit framework. The study will enroll and evaluate 300 rheumatoid arthritis patients through an app that runs on iPhones, freeing GSK from the need to activate trial sites while giving it access to sensors with the potential to measure wrist movement.
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Wearing my own Oura wellness ring daily, I can see huge potential on Apple collaboration with pharma.
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Why Amazon invested in this cancer-testing startup founded by a Google exec

Why Amazon invested in this cancer-testing startup founded by a Google exec | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

A health start-up called Grail is developing one of the most ambitious technologies in Silicon Valley.

And Amazon wants a piece of it.

According to two sources familiar, Amazon invested in Grail as a very special kind of future customer for its cloud business.

 

Grail is hoping that its can use deep sequencing technology to detect the earliest signs of cancer in the blood, while it's still treatable. That requires a huge amount of data processing and storage.

That's potentially a huge business for Amazon Web Services.

Reuters reported that the market to store human genetic data is expected to be worth $1 billion by 2018. By 2025, an anticipated 100 million and 2 billion human genomics could be sequenced, according to a 2015 report. Biologists have long-anticipated that the computing resources to handle all that data would outweigh Twitter and YouTube.

Grail's test will not be commercialized in the U.S. for years -- it is aiming for 2019 -- but it will be dabbling in huge data-sets well before then.

It needs to run large-scale clinical studies to demonstrate to industry stakeholders that its technology is both sensitive and accurate. Hundreds of thousands of people will need to be sequenced for each of these studies. And the genomes will need to be securely stored somewhere.

Amazon's investment, initially reported earlier this year, was a little surprising. The e-commerce and cloud services leader doesn't typically bet on start-ups in the regulated life sciences sector. Moreover, Grail CEO Jeff Huber, was a long-time executive at Google, an Amazon rival. (Google also invested in an earlier fund-raising round for Grail through GV, its venture arm, now a division of Google holding company Alphabet.)

But these companies are "positioning themselves for something they think will be big," said Zamin Iqbal, who leads a computational genomics research group at the European Bioinformatics Institute.

Iqbal doesn't expect revenues to be significant yet, in part due to privacy concerns and lack of uptick for whole genome analysis from health providers.

But that could all change in the coming years. "The future of genomics is likely to involve the cloud heavily," he continued.

Another factor that drew Amazon into the deal was Grail's presence in Asia, the people said. In March, the company merged with a blood diagnostics company in China. Amazon Web Services has announced it plans to open a new data center "region" in Hong Kong in 2018.

 


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Denise Silber's curator insight, August 28, 5:34 AM
Detecting cancer and other diseases in blood, other body fluids, such as sweat, and tomorrow in microbiome patterns, is the new holy grail.
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Fair Pricing Forum

Fair Pricing Forum | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

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PatientView's curator insight, August 23, 4:52 AM

WHO (focused) contribution to the fair pricing of medicines - report

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Social Media for Medical Technology Companies

Companies can leverage social media to drive business and compete effectively in the new era of health care. But what do you need to know before jumping in or …

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How Wearable Technology is Transforming Healthcare? #Infographic

How Wearable Technology is Transforming Healthcare? #Infographic | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Health care providers are using wearable technology to enhance the clinical outcomes of sufferers of chronic diseases and improve clinician/patient engagement processes.

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10 ways healthcare companies are testing Instagram

10 ways healthcare companies are testing Instagram | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

1. Medtronic (Corporate)

The medical device company, which develops insulin pumps for diabetes patients, has more than 16,000 followers. Wendy Blackburn, EVP of Intouch Solutions, said Instagram makes sense for diabetes marketing, since it has always been a disease category that is active on social media and tends to have a broad age range of patients.





2. Team Novo Nordisk (Corporate) 

“Racing to inspire, educate and empower everyone affected by diabetes” is the tagline of Novo Nordisk's diabetes pro cycling team. This account has more than 73,000 followers and close to 2,000 posts.




3. #BreatheBoldly(Campaign)

In honor of the late Leonard Nimoy, who famously played Mr. Spock from “Star Trek,” Philips Healthcare and the COPD Foundation launched the #BreatheBoldly campaign to raise awareness of COPD in November. Celebrities such as actress Whoopi Goldberg, actor Vince Vaughn, and reality TV star Melissa Gorga posted videos on their Facebook and Instagram pages to show the challenges of suffering from the condition.





4. Flonase (Brand)

Facebook Health industry manager Danielle Salowski points to GlaxoSmithKline's over-the-counter allergy treatment Flonase as a good example of Instagram used well, showcasing vibrant seasonal imagery with related comments and information about how allergies affect people in the winter, spring, fall, and summer.





5. Pfizer (Corporate)

Blackburn doesn't recommend deleting comments, even when they are negative. She noted that Pfizer has a lot of trolls on its Instagram page, but doesn't delete them. “There will always be trolls and haters,” she said. “Deleting sends the wrong message because you're on there to engage to begin with.”

See also: How can drugmakers tell better stories? Try Instagram





6. Bayer4Animals (Corporate) 

According to a study by BarkBox, dog owners in the U.S. on average post one photo or talk about their dog on social media six times a week. Bayer Animal Health targets pet owners and animal lovers with engaging animal photos and information about keeping them healthy.





7. Tylenol (Brand)

Like Flonase, Johnson & Johnson's Tylenol ties different moments throughout their year with content that tells a story through that lens, noted Salowski. “What I like about that is people know what to expect when they see content from Tylenol,” she said. “That's how they're connecting and engaging, and they just do a beautiful job with their photography and taking advantage of the mobile format.”




8. Emily Maynard for Diclegis (Influencer)

In June, The Bachelor and The Bachelorette's Emily Maynard Johnson made a post about her experience taking Duchesnay USA's morning sickness pill Diclegis — including safety information. It is the drugmakers second attempt at leveraging a celebrity spokesperson's Instagram handle — following a less successful example with Kim Kardashian West in July 2015 — to reach its target audience of expectant mothers.





9. Novartis (Corporate)


Novartis' corporate Instagram page comprises a mix of images and videos showing their corporate history and milestones, social and humanitarian efforts, and the drugmaker's attention to education and training.





10. Sanofi (Corporate)

There are drugmakers like Sanofi that have created an Instagram handle but not yet activated it with posts.


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25,000 data points per day: Wearable sensors can alert you when you are getting sick

25,000 data points per day: Wearable sensors can alert you when you are getting sick | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

A new wave of portable biosensors allows frequent measurement of health-related physiology. A group at Stanford investigated the use of these devices to monitor human physiological changes during various activities and their role in managing health and diagnosing and analyzing disease. By recording over 250,000 daily measurements for up to 43 individuals, they found personalized circadian differences in physiological parameters, replicating previous physiological findings. Interestingly, the research group also found striking changes in particular environments, such as airline flights (decreased peripheral capillary oxygen saturation [SpO2] and increased radiation exposure). These events are associated with physiological macro-phenotypes such as fatigue, providing a strong association between reduced pressure/oxygen and fatigue on high-altitude flights.

 

Importantly, when they combined biosensor information with frequent medical measurements, they made two important observations: First, wearable devices were useful in identification of early signs of Lyme disease and inflammatory responses; the research team used this information to develop a personalized, activity-based normalization framework to identify abnormal physiological signals from longitudinal data for facile disease detection. Second, wearables distinguish physiological differences between insulin-sensitive and -resistant individuals.

 

Overall, these results indicate that portable biosensors provide useful information for monitoring personal activities and physiology and are likely to play an important role in managing health and enabling affordable health care access to groups traditionally limited by socioeconomic class or remote geography.


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GSK and MIT Team Up to Test Flumoji - an Android App That May Provide RWE in Clinical Trials

GSK and MIT Team Up to Test Flumoji - an Android App That May Provide RWE in Clinical Trials | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

Flumoji is your health wizard. Tell it how you feel and it will magically learn how to help protect you from Flu and other ailments.


This MIT study is designed to help increase awareness of the spread of flu and flu-like symptoms and educate you on how to reduce the risk of -- and help prevent -- flu infection. Your data along with other users of the app could potentially improve overall health outcomes in the general population.

 

Flumoji is being tested by MIT and GSK to see if it can speed up identification of flu outbreaks.

 

“Real-time tracking of seasonal flu outbreaks is key,” says GSK on Facebook. “However, researchers have yet to find a tracking mechanism that’s fast and reliable enough to support testing of potential #flu treatments in clinical trials.”


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rob halkes's curator insight, January 12, 9:15 AM

RWE (real world evidence) and RWD (-data) bear the promise that we find context conditions and personal factores needed for #precisionmedicine ! It takes more to "tango" however, so it is good to see how initial collaborations begin to find ground!

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Social media and mobile apps: Bringing people and clinical trials together | Pharmafile

Social media and mobile apps: Bringing people and clinical trials together | Pharmafile | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Pharmafile.com is a leading portal for the pharmaceutical industry, providing industry professionals with pharma news, jobs, events, and service company listings.
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Astronauts to trial healthcare wearables in space 

Astronauts to trial healthcare wearables in space  | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

A 'smart shirt' designed to remotely monitor the wearer's health via a series of sensors is set to be tested in space in an upcoming mission by the Canadian Space Agency (CSA).


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Which drugmakers have the healthiest presence on social media?

Which drugmakers have the healthiest presence on social media? | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

Ogilvy Healthworld tracked the activity of the 20 largest global companies' Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube channels from January to June, using audience intelligence platform Pulsar Core.

In the above graph from its report, The Social Check-up, the number of posts is measured on the x-axis. Lilly was the most prolific poster and so appears furthest to the right, dwarfing infrequent publishers Allergan, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, and Takeda Pharmaceuticals.

See also: 8 ways for pharma to improve the way it uses Twitter

However, Lilly's posting did not always create engagement. It posted nearly twice as much as Boehringer Ingelheim and seven times as much as Novo Nordisk. These two firms scored highly on an engagement ranking calculated around likes, shares, comments, and retweets, shown on the y-axis.

The size of the dots relates to size of social media following — Johnson & Johnson has the largest.

See also: Omitting risk info in ads is top reason for FDA warning

The report says: "The rise of paid social has offered companies the ability to achieve better user response rates through highly specific content targeting. It is difficult to speculate which of the pharma companies studied were using paid social strategies. This may be one of the reasons Novo Nordisk and Boehringer Ingelheim achieved significantly higher levels of engagement compared with their competitors."

Another finding of the report is that disease awareness was the most common content theme posted by pharma firms, but their audiences actually preferred to interact with company news and CSR-related content.


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Ruth Whittington's curator insight, October 14, 2016 8:58 AM
Pharma and social media: which company comes out on top?
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Can Online Articles Improve Patient Education, Engagement?

Can Online Articles Improve Patient Education, Engagement? | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Research suggests that patients enjoy reading about healthcare in online blogs, and that it may help boost their patient education and engagement.

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FDA lowers regulatory bar for wellness apps and devices

FDA lowers regulatory bar for wellness apps and devices | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

This story was delivered to BI IntelligenceApps and Platforms Briefing subscribers. To learn more and subscribe, please click here.

General wellness apps and devices such as fitness and activity trackers will not be examined by the Center for Devices and Radiological Health, according to guidelines released by the FDA.

The new guidance strikes a well-balanced approach to the growing health app and device ecosystem, affording regulation for the space while still providing room for innovation. The mHealth solutions market is expected to grow at an annualized rate of 33.4% over the next four years to reach $59.2 billion in 2020, according to Markets and Markets. 

The guidance specifies that there are two categories of “general wellness” products: those that aim to improve overall health but don’t make any references to specific diseases or conditions — such as an app that plays soothing music for stress management — and those that do reference diseases or conditions but that can be controlled by a healthy lifestyle such as skin cancer from UV exposure.

In particular, amending the words “very low risk” to “low risk” will lower the bar for developers and manufacturers seeking to enter the wearables health care market. Low-risk general wellness tools must not be invasive, cannot be implanted, and cannot use technology that would pose a risk to patients in specific regulatory controls are not in place. 

 


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