Empowered Patient...
Follow
Find
369 views | +0 today
Empowered Patient and Doctor
Empowered Patient and Doctor
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

What should hospitals do to maximize their social presence?

What should hospitals do to maximize their social presence? | Empowered Patient and Doctor | Scoop.it

I think there are some constants that apply to almost all hospitals, though. Chief among them is the fact that hospitals really do change peoples' lives. The emotional difference between "I just had a great cup of coffee at the new place on the corner" and "the doctors at Children's Hospital just saved my daughters life" is almost too enormous to express.

 

A hospital is making positive impacts on people's lives every day. Furthermore, the actions of a hospital not only affect the patient, but also the family and friends of that patient. One positive experience can create dozens of "brand evangelists" for that hospital. This is very different from, say, consumer products. I love my iPad, but the sale of that iPad to me earned Apple only one brand evangelist.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

Does Your CIO Have What it Takes? - Forbes

Does Your CIO Have What it Takes? - Forbes | Empowered Patient and Doctor | Scoop.it

Do you know which technology is essential for your business going forward?
Can you directly correlate business value with your IT spend?
Do you know how your IT spend compares with the competition?
Is IT a cost-effective business partner? Can you rely on IT promises?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

How social media has changed my medical practice

How social media has changed my medical practice | Empowered Patient and Doctor | Scoop.it
The unexpected consequence was how much social media has changed my medical practice, and me.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

Principle of protecting privacy

http://www.cato.org/pubs/journal/cj22n1/cj22n1-4.pdf

 

Moreover, the breadth and malleability of the term “privacy” has
had a remarkable effect on the political debate over the role of law in
protecting it. Because “privacy” can mean almost anything to anybody,
and because the term carries such emotional weight (conjuring
up, as it does, images of the sanctity of the body and the home),
legislators can generate broad support for so-called privacy laws just
by invoking the word. Yet without any specificity as to what privacy
interest a proposed law or regulation is intended to serve, neither
legislators nor the public can determine whether a need exists, whether
the law in fact meets that need, and whether there are less expensive
or burdensome ways of accomplishing the same end.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

What are HIPAA compliant applications using Amazon Web Services?

What are HIPAA compliant applications using Amazon Web Services? | Empowered Patient and Doctor | Scoop.it
Answer (1 of 4): ddsWebLink - http://aws.amazon.com/solutions/case-studies/ddsweblink/ DiskAgent - http://aws.amazon.com/solutions/case-studies/diskagent/ TC3 Health - http://aws.amazon.com/solutions/case-studies/tc3-health/ MedCommons -...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

"Hungry, Hungry HIPPA: When Privacy Regulations Go Too Far" by Meredith Kapushion

This Comment explores the constructs and consequences of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1966 (“HIPAA”).

To illustrate part of the problem, consider a hypothetical hospital that caters only to patients with the lowest of privacy preferences. Even with all patients choosing to sign authorization and consent forms, the hospital would not escape the administrative and operative burdens that HIPAA imposes. The federal regulations mandate that the hospital jump through every compliance hoop, regardless of consumer preferences.The patients end up bearing the financial costs of a system that offers them little or no substantial benefit. less 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

The Blockbuster Drug of the Century: An Engaged Patient | HL7 Standards

The Blockbuster Drug of the Century: An Engaged Patient | HL7 Standards | Empowered Patient and Doctor | Scoop.it
All this is so different for healthcare providers. It’s like a great restaurant learning that their new business is going to be – in addition to continuing to provide a great in-restaurant experience – teaching people how to cook at home. What? This isn’t what we do! It’s impossible!

 

Actually, it’s surprising that it has taken us this long to focus on patient engagement because the results we have thus far are nothing short of astounding. If patient engagement were a drug, it would be the blockbuster drug of the century and malpractice not to use it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

Are you health care literate? - The York Daily Record

Are you health care literate? - The York Daily Record | Empowered Patient and Doctor | Scoop.it

The future of good health will, and should, look more like a partnership. A partnership that includes a physician-led Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH), which means placing the patient and the primary care practice at the very center of care to create a collaborative environment between you and your primary care team.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

Why one-third of hospitals will close by 2020

Why one-third of hospitals will close by 2020 | Empowered Patient and Doctor | Scoop.it

A comment in the post 

 

--------------

I work in healthcare IT as a contract developer/business analyst - to me one of the biggest problems in healthcare is the amount of overhead - let me give you 2 examples at opposite ends of the spectrum, example 1 I am working with an organization right now that has over 1200 software platforms - many with overlapping functionality but different business owners - each business owner isn't willing to give up there little empire - even though it is creating a silo effect with their operational information - not to mention the maintenance and support contracts that are required to keep 1200 systems with overlapping functionality running - exmaple 2 - I worked for an organization that is hardly using any software applications to run their business - they keep hiring more people to meet their mandated quality/financial/patient satisfaction reporting - not only are they spending a ridiculous amount of money on overhead salaries but they definitely have too many cooks in the kitchen and it takes them forever to make a decision on where the organization should be headed - if hopsital organizations could find the right mix of administrators who have a clear vision of how to use technology it could dramatically change the healthcare experience - not to mention put the focus back on patient care - oh and for those who work in healthcare the other big problem I see day in and day out is there aen't many career paths/opportunities to advance your career - therefore healthcare isn't attracting the most talented people.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

What does being a Participatory Patient mean? | Ability 4 Life

What does being a Participatory Patient mean? | Ability 4 Life | Empowered Patient and Doctor | Scoop.it
This concept seems especially essential for anyone caring for someone whose quality of life is constantly adversely affected by a health condition: get in the driver’s seat. Be that as it may, being a participatory patient is not for the faint of heart. As a member of the Society, I decided to articulate my own philosophy:

My 8 Point Philosophy of Participatory Medicine

 

 . I want to learn about my health issue(s).

* I feel I have sufficient skills and capabilities to be participatory.
* I understand that, along with the learning and empowerment process, come stresses, disappointments, irritation, frustration, and exhaustion.

2. When I don’t understand something, I ask for an explanation.

* In the doctor’s office, I seek strategies to improve meaningful communication, and ask that jargon be written down so I can do my own research.
* Before a doctor’s appointment, if I’m fearful, I research symptoms and conditions to the best of my abilities, and bring my questions with me.

3. I’ve learned to do my own research.

I use a combination of: keyword searches, seeking out communities of interest online; talking things through within my communities – real and virtual; when the appointment comes, consultation with the primary care physician and/or another appropriate healthcare professional (eg, chiropractor, pharmacist, or occupational therapist).

* If there’s a referral to a specialist, I repeat the above process.

4. I get copies of any and all laboratory reports.

* I likely will not understand much of what is in the report, so when reading something that worries me, I try to keep the anxiety at bay until I go over the results with the primary care physician.
* Waiting until the doctor’s appointment can be stressful, but I consider it an opportunity to learn what to watch for in the next report.
* Where electronic health records (EHRs) allow, I ask that my comments be noted in the health records.

5. I do my part.

* I maintain a healthy lifestyle, and try to do all the “right things.”
* If I have issues (eg, with various meds or side effects) I move quickly to try to get them sorted out and to resolve them.
* I’m willing to accept help.
* I make sure to keep my primary care physician in the loop, and ensure that my comments are incorporated into the EHR.

6. Sometimes I don’t do, sometimes I can’t do.

* I make choices that aren’t/may not be in the best interests of my overall health.
* I accept responsibility for these choices and expect them to be respected.
* I accept that when I’m not feeling well enough, I can’t be as actively participatory.

7. My health care team.

* I try to establish rapport with my team of health care professionals, for a relationship that is mutually respectful and provides me with the best possible care, as well as caring.
* I recognize that trust is gained over time.
* I rely upon my health care professionals because of their training, knowledge, and perspective.
* My communities, real-life and virtual, are also part of my health care team.

8. I trust in myself, and to the extent possible, in my ability to make good decisions about my/my loved one’s health care.

What would you add to these 8 points?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

Letters

Letters | Empowered Patient and Doctor | Scoop.it
Erik Baard's "The Guilt-Free Soldier" [January 22-28] warns about the latest breakthrough in psychopharmacology, a pill that dissolves the moral sense: "Every value he learned as a boy tells him to back down, to return to base and find another way of routing the enemy. Or, he reasons, he could complete the task and rush back to start popping pills that can, over the course of two weeks, immunize him against a lifetime of crushing remorse."

 

This piece of pharmaco-mythology, characteristic of our age, is extraordinarily naive. Drugs act on the body, not our moral sense. Scientists will never develop a drug that will annul our moral sense. Nor need they do so. Such a drug was discovered thousands of years ago and has been successfully used by people everywhere: It is called "religion." Clergymen confidently assure combatants on all sides—Israelis and Palestinians, Americans and Iraqis—that God is on their side. This has successfully tranquilized billions throughout history and there is no evidence that the power of this "drug" is waning. To the contrary, it is becoming more powerful before our very eyes.

Thomas Szasz, M.D.
Professor of Psychiatry Emeritus
Upstate Medical University
State University of New York, Syracuse

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

SULLUM: The man vs. the therapeutic state

SULLUM: The man vs. the therapeutic state | Empowered Patient and Doctor | Scoop.it

The New York Times obituary for Thomas Szasz, who died this month at the age of 92, says his critique of psychiatry “had some merit in the 1950s ... but not later on, when the field began developing more scientific approaches.”


That’s a paraphrase of historian Edward Shorter, whose judgment reflects the conventional wisdom: Szasz called much-needed attention to psychiatric abuses early in his career but went too far by insisting on a fundamental distinction between actual, biological diseases and metaphorical diseases of the mind.
In fact, however, Szasz’s radicalism, which he combined with a sharp wit, a keen eye for obfuscating rhetoric, and an uncompromising dedication to individual freedom and responsibility, was one of his greatest strengths. Beginning with “The Myth of Mental Illness” in 1961 and continuing through 35 more books and hundreds of articles, the maverick psychiatrist, driven by a “passion against coercion,” zeroed in on the foundational fallacies underlying all manner of medicalized tyranny.


The idea that psychiatry became scientifically rigorous soon after Szasz first likened it to alchemy and astrology is hard to take seriously. After all, it was not until 1973 that the American Psychiatric Association (APA) stopped calling homosexuality a mental disorder.


More often, psychiatry has expanded. Today it encompasses myriad sins and foibles, including smoking, overeating, gambling, shoplifting, sexual promiscuity, pederasty, rambunctiousness, inattentiveness, social awkwardness, anxiety, sadness and political extremism.


If it can be described, it can be diagnosed, but only if the APA says so. Asperger’s, for instance, will cease to exist when the fifth edition of the APA’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) comes out next year.


As Marcia Angell, former editor of The New England Journal of Medicine, observed last year in The New York Review of Books, “there are no objective signs or tests for mental illness — no lab data or MRI findings — and the boundaries between normal and abnormal are often unclear.


That makes it possible to expand diagnostic boundaries or even create new diagnoses in ways that would be impossible, say, in a field like cardiology.” In other words, mental illnesses are whatever psychiatrists say they are.


How “scientific” is that? Not very. In a 2010 Wired interview, Allen Frances, lead editor of the current DSM, declared that “mental disorders most certainly are not diseases.”
Then what exactly are they? For more than half a century, Szasz stubbornly highlighted the hazards of joining such a fuzzy, subjective concept with the force of law through involuntary treatment, the insanity defense and other psychiatrically informed policies.
Consider “sexually violent predators,” who are convicted and imprisoned based on the premise that they could have restrained themselves but failed to do so, then committed to mental hospitals after completing their sentences based on the premise that they suffer from irresistible urges and therefore pose an intolerable threat to public safety.
From a Szaszian perspective, this incoherent theory is a cover for what is really going on: the retroactive enhancement of duly imposed sentences by politicians who decided certain criminals were getting off too lightly .
Szasz specialized in puncturing such pretensions. He relentlessly attacked the “therapeutic state” — the unhealthy alliance of medicine and government that blesses all sorts of unjustified limits on liberty, ranging from the mandatory prescription system to laws against suicide.
My own work has been powerfully influenced by Szasz’s arguments against drug prohibition, especially his discussion of its symbolism and its reliance on a mistaken understanding of addiction, and his criticism of paternalistic interventions, such as New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s recently approved soda serving ceiling, that conflate private and public health.
I will always be grateful for Szasz’s courage and insight, and so should anyone who shares his passion against coercion.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

Sociology of Medicine : Medicalization of Deviance

Sociology of Medicine : Medicalization of Deviance | Empowered Patient and Doctor | Scoop.it
Peter Conrad wrote the book The Medicalization of Society in 2007 that is a key contribution to our understanding of the sociology of medicine. One classic example of medicalization that is often used is Peter Conrad’s (2007) article The Discovery of Hyperkinesis: Notes on the medicalization of Deviant Behavior. In this article, Peter Conrad documents how hyperkinesis (attention deficit, hyperactivity as more of us might know it) became a medical term. Initially, children very very active behaviors were considered ‘normal’, or perhaps much more active, curious, anti-social, rebellious or stimulated than the average child.

 

Slowly, the pharmaceutical revolution in psychological disorders increased the status of the use of medicines for childhood disorders, and a growing interest in child psychiatry gave a credible foundation to educate the public about this new disorder. Alongside these, there were social agents and moral entrepreneurs (individuals who construct and label a particular social phenomenon to be problematic) like pharmaceutical companies that served to construct hyperkinesis as a medical problem that medical doctors ought to provide medical diagnosi or medical attention.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Vishal Kumar Singh from Healthcare innovative marketing
Scoop.it!

Marketing is dead

Marketing is dead | Empowered Patient and Doctor | Scoop.it

Bill Lee writes:

 

'Traditional marketing — including advertising, public relations, branding and corporate communications — is dead. Many people in traditional marketing roles and organizations may not realize they're operating within a dead paradigm. But they are. The evidence is clear.

 

First, buyers are no longer paying much attention. Several studies have confirmed that in the "buyer's decision journey," traditional marketing communications just aren't relevant. Buyers are checking out product and service information in their own way, often through the Internet, and often from sources outside the firm such as word-of-mouth or customer reviews.

 

Second, CEOs have lost all patience. In a devastating 2011 study of 600 CEOs and decision makers by the London-based Fournaise Marketing Group, 73% of them said that CMOs lack business credibility and the ability to generate sufficient business growth, 72% are tired of being asked for money without explaining how it will generate increased business, and 77% have had it with all the talk about brand equity that can't be linked to actual firm equity or any other recognized financial metric.

 

Third, in today's increasingly social media-infused environment, traditional marketing and sales not only doesn't work so well, it doesn't make sense. Think about it: an organization hires people — employees, agencies, consultants, partners — who don't come from the buyer's world and whose interests aren't necessarily aligned with his, and expects them to persuade the buyer to spend his hard-earned money on something. Huh? When you try to extend traditional marketing logic into the world of social media, it simply doesn't work. Just ask Facebook, which finds itself mired in an ongoing debate about whether marketing on Facebook is effective.

 

In fact, this last is a bit of a red herring, because traditional marketing isn't really working anywhere.'

 

Instead, Bill Lee suggests:

 

* Find your customer influencers

* Help them build social capital

* Get your customer advocates involved in the solution you provide


Via Andrew Spong, Laura Browne
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

Khan Academy Approach Poised to Solve a "Wicked Problem" in Healthcare - The Doctor Weighs In

Khan Academy Approach Poised to Solve a "Wicked Problem" in Healthcare - The Doctor Weighs In | Empowered Patient and Doctor | Scoop.it

So much of our present care delivery is rote and could be practiced online or provided via video/blog/text. And that the ‘real medicine,’ the service and the relationship or helping people in moments of anxiety and indecision are rare and undervalued. That oddly enough, there is simply no time in the day to do what matters most. Or if we get the opportunity to forge a real partnership, it comes at the cost of making somebody wait, and running late. So yes, we’re headed in the right direction by making these changes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

HIPAA on Privacy: Its Intended and Unintended Consequences

HIPAA on Privacy: Its Intended and Unintended Consequences

At first blush, it looks as though HIPAA is a vindication of
the importance of consent. But on a closer look, the entire system seems more Orwellian
than libertarian. In this case, the constant mantra of consent functions as a tool to disguise
public coercion. The key strategy: all individuals are required to give consent, not
comprehensively, but for each separate transaction. What the regulations do is create a
system in which each of us is required to exercise, repeatedly and against our own will,
this “right” to permit others to use information about us. The loss of freedom in this
context comes from our inability to waive the protections of the Act with a single Internet
message that says, “Doc, use whatever records you want in the way that you think best, in
accordance with the common practice of your institution.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

Amazon Adds Dedicated Cloud Instances -- Virtualization Review

Acknowledging that some enterprise customers don't want to share computing resources, Amazon Web Services (AWS) today launched what it calls EC2 Dedicated Instances.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

Verizon launches HIPAA-compliant eHealth cloud service

Verizon launches HIPAA-compliant eHealth cloud service | Empowered Patient and Doctor | Scoop.it

Verizon has launched a hosted service for storing healthcare information for providers and insurers that meets HIPAAs strict privacy and security standards.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

Schools, health literacy and public health: possibilities and challenges

Schools are essential in achieving health literacy. The school is a fundamental institution in building the wealth and health of countries, and education has been shown to be a key factor in narrowing the differential between rich and poor.

There are very strong correlations between poverty and poor health (World Bank, 1993; WHO, 1996a). It is therefore vital that we look at what schools can do to equip young people with knowledge and skills at the highest level to enable them to be active participants in shaping those policies and practices that impact on their own health, and the health of their community and country

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

Would Increased Reimbursement And Longer Visits Improve Physician-Patient Communications?

Would Increased Reimbursement And Longer Visits Improve Physician-Patient Communications? | Empowered Patient and Doctor | Scoop.it
In a word…no. It has been said that a physician’s patient communication skills are just as important as their clinical knowledge.   After all, it is only by “talking to and listening patients...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

Five Myths About Empowered Patients Or E-Patients

Five Myths About Empowered Patients Or E-Patients | Empowered Patient and Doctor | Scoop.it
Irrational exuberance was a term once used to describe the stock market before the last crash.  It also seems an apt description for much of the talk these days about empowered health consumers. To...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

Empowered Physicians Embrace Growing Community with ePatient Posters

Empowered Physicians Embrace Growing Community with ePatient Posters | Empowered Patient and Doctor | Scoop.it

Doctors with no patience for e-patients may soon have no patients.


Kevin Pho, MD posits, "Our health system does not promote the communication necessary for physicians to engage e-patients... Patients, on average, are interrupted less than 20 seconds after they start talking." [5] Often what is needed is a few extra moments to flesh out what may be happening and calmly explain and rule out, with mutual feedback, possible diagnoses and treatments. A shy patient is more likely to have concerns but not voice them, in hopes that the doctor will arrive at the suspected conclusion. When that conclusion is not addressed, the patient may visit other doctors.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

Political abuse of psychiatry in the Soviet Union - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Political abuse of psychiatry in the Soviet Union - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | Empowered Patient and Doctor | Scoop.it

In the Soviet Union, systematic political abuse of psychiatry took place.[1][2][3]:406[4][5][6]:19[7]:47[8]:293[9][10]:66[11]:490[12]:52 Soviet psychiatric hospitals known as "psikhushkas" were used by the authorities as prisons in order to isolate hundreds or thousands of political prisoners from the rest of society, discredit their ideas, and break them physically and mentally.[13] This method was also employed against religious prisoners and most especially against well-educated former atheists who adopted a religion. In such cases their religious faith was determined to be a form of mental illness that needed to be cured.[14] Formerly highly classified extant documents from "Special file" of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union published after the dissolution of the Soviet Union demonstrate that the authorities of the country quite consciously used psychiatry as a tool to suppress dissent

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Vishal Kumar Singh
Scoop.it!

“Is Anybody Sane Here?” Said the Psychiatrist to the Journalists | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

“Is Anybody Sane Here?” Said the Psychiatrist to the Journalists | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | Empowered Patient and Doctor | Scoop.it
The intriguing question about our sanity wasn’t directed particularly at the journalists, scientists and doctors in the crowd. It was a dig at what Frances called “diagnostic inflation” in psychiatry. Even with DSM-4, this problem was already starting to gallop away from us, as more and more of the “symptoms of daily life” were re-cast as mental disorders – with drugs carrying common adverse effects and a high price tag as the prescription.

 

How big is the problem? Using DSM-4 criteria for mental disorders, almost half the people in the US are getting a diagnosis of a mental disorder in their lifetime – and other countries aren’t far behind. Frances fears that “the pool of normal is becoming a small puddle.”

more...
No comment yet.