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Health Studies Updates
Ideas, news and information for any health professional. Check my social networks at: http://xeeme.com/Natalie_Stewart
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Rescooped by Natalie Stewart from Literature & Psychology
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What really made Mary Ingalls go blind? It wasn't scarlet fever

What really made Mary Ingalls go blind? It wasn't scarlet fever | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

What really made Mary Ingalls go blind? It wasn't scarlet fever
NBCNews.com (blog)

 

today, the journal Pediatrics asserts that it wasn't scarlet fever that caused Mary's blindness -- it was viral meningoencephalitis, an inflammatory disease that attacks the brain.


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Mary Daniels Brown's curator insight, February 4, 2013 12:05 PM

How Laura Ingalls's classic children's series sparked a future doctor's research

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February 4, 2013: Health Study Weekly is out

February 4, 2013: Health Study Weekly is out | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

An online newspaper that collects together the week's news relating to health education.  


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Microsoft betting on unified communication for health care

Microsoft betting on unified communication for health care | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

It’s an increasingly complex process for hospital workers to communicate and collaborate within clinical and administrative areas.

 

Hospital staff members are constantly looking to stay connected and share information with each other. On-call physicians need to communicate with the nursing staff and other colleagues, nurses need to contact each other to follow up on patient’s needs, and administrative staff need to collaborate on certain activities.

 

Communication in the health care area takes many forms, such as: Email, short message service (SMS), telephone, video conferencing and messaging inside clinical applications.

 

While there are several strong enterprise players that use one or more of these communication methods in their platform, some have been able to dominate the marketplace with their unified communication solutions. Microsoft is the latest addition to the list of big vendors who are entering the market with a comprehensive solution that covers almost all of the communication methods and provides a strong return on investment (ROI) that is hard to ignore.


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Bright Screens Could Delay Bedtime

Bright Screens Could Delay Bedtime | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
Using a tablet or computer in the late evening disrupts the body's melatonin production
Natalie Stewart's insight:

Mariana Figueiro of the Lighting Research Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and her team showed that two hours of iPad use at maximum brightness was enough to suppress people's normal nighttime release of melatonin, a key hormone in the body's clock, or circadian system. Melatonin tells your body that it is night, helping to make you sleepy. If you delay that signal, Figueiro says, you could delay sleep. Other research indicates that “if you do that chronically, for many years, it can lead to disruption of the circadian system,” sometimes with serious health consequences, she explains.

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Nightcap Drink Disrupts Important Sleep: Scientific American Podcast

Nightcap Drink Disrupts Important Sleep: Scientific American Podcast | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

A little booze before bedtime might help you fall asleep faster. But various studies show that alcohol is anathema for restorative sleep. A new review paper describes just how detrimental a few drinks can be.

Natalie Stewart's insight:

Disrupted and insufficient sleep has been linked to everything from weight gain to heart problems. Not to mention harming memory and well-being. It may be time to say goodnight to the nightcap.

 

 

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Bill Gates speaks of world's difficult fight to eradicate polio

Bill Gates speaks of world's difficult fight to eradicate polio | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
Billionaire Microsoft chairman delivers Richard Dimbleby lecture and reveals his dedication to fighting the disease
Natalie Stewart's insight:

The billionaire Microsoft chairman, who launched the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, believes that society needs to act quickly, describing the mission as "a test" for the human race.

Delivering this year's Richard Dimbleby lecture, Gates revealed the fight against the disease was the project he dedicated most of his time to.

"Most people in developed countries know of polio as a disease that used to paralyse lots of children. But it's not just a historical curiosity – it still strikes children today," he said.

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Steven Schwaitzberg: A universal translator for surgeons

Laparoscopic surgery uses minimally invasive incisions -- which means less pain and shorter recovery times for patients. But Steven Schwaitzberg has run into two problems teaching these techniques to surgeons around the world -- language and distance. He shares how a new technology, which combines video conferencing and a real-time universal translator, could help.


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Why Google Flu Trends Will Not Replace the CDC Anytime Soon

Why Google Flu Trends Will Not Replace the CDC Anytime Soon | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
The search giant's software has the uncanny ability to assess the severity of an influenza outbreak. But it's missing something essential -- a human factor.
Natalie Stewart's insight:

In a world where Target knows a woman is pregnant before she or her family does, the power of enormous digital data sets should not be ignored. We all leave huge tracks of data wherever we go – shopping in stores, but especially on the Internet. And these swathes of data create a shadow of our real world that can be analyzed. But it’s still just a shadow. While Google’s Flu trends have passed the acceptance of academic research, the search giant admits that the project needs constant tweaking.

 
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Zurker - a social network with a difference

Zurker - a social network with a difference | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

Zurker - a new social network:

http://www.zurker.net/i-271732-iaxgtugifc

My first reaction - "do we need yet another social network?"

After reading about the philosophy of Zurker, my answer was "yes" - because it is one that is owned by the network members and responsive to needs of the network members, rather than being a centralized, corporate, profit-oriented, juggernaut.

Zurker is literally a member-owned application.  You actually get shares in the company and so can profit from its growth.

And Zurker is driven by democracy. It's new - and still developing. Instead of changes being introduced top-down (whether you wanted the change or not) Zurker seeks out your ideas and feedback, so that their development team can develop the social application most in tune with what users actually want.

And it's free, of course.  Check it out here:

http://www.zurker.net/i-271732-iaxgtugifc


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Phyllis Smith's curator insight, August 7, 2013 7:44 PM

If you didn't get involved with Facebook on the ground floor - you now have that opportunity with this new social network - Zurker

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iRobot's Medical Robot Gets FDA Approval for Hospital Use

iRobot's Medical Robot Gets FDA Approval for Hospital Use | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
RP-VITA is the first autonomous navigation remote presence robot to receive FDA clearance for use in hospitals.
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Natalie Stewart's curator insight, January 24, 2013 9:22 PM

You may soon see Rosie the Robot strolling the halls of more hospitals now that iRobot's remote presence robot has been given official FDA clearance. The Remote Presence Virtual + Independent Telemedicine Assistant, or RP-VITA for short, is the first autonomous navigation remote presence robot to receive FDA clearance for use in hospitals.

The robot is designed to allow medical specialists to communicate remotely with patients. Using an iPad interface and sensors to navigate, the doctor can maneuver the hospital corridors virtually by tapping on locations he or she wants the robot to go to.

 
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FDA Approves Drug to Deal With Side Effects of HIV/AIDs Treatments

FDA Approves Drug to Deal With Side Effects of HIV/AIDs Treatments | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
The FDA has approved a new medication that can treat the side effects that come from treating HIV/AIDs. (FDA Approves Drug to Deal With Side Effects of HIV/AIDs Treatments: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approv...
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Molecular ‘switch’ may play role in tumor suppression

Molecular ‘switch’ may play role in tumor suppression | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
Structural biologists have identified a "topology switch" in the protein clathrin, the function of which may shed light on molecular processes involved in tumor suppression.
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Pesticides and Parkinson's: UCLA researchers uncover further proof of a link

Pesticides and Parkinson's: UCLA researchers uncover further proof of a link | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

UCLA researchers have discovered a link between Parkinson's and another pesticide, benomyl, whose toxicological effects still linger some 10 years after the chemical was banned by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Even more significantly, the research suggests that the damaging series of events set in motion by benomyl may also occur in people with Parkinson's disease who were never exposed to the pesticide, according to Jeff Bronstein, senior author of the study and a professor of neurology at UCLA, and his colleagues.

Benomyl exposure, they say, starts a cascade of cellular events that may lead to Parkinson's. The pesticide prevents an enzyme called ALDH (aldehyde dehydrogenase) from keeping a lid on DOPAL, a toxin that naturally occurs in the brain. When left unchecked by ALDH, DOPAL accumulates, damages neurons and increases an individual's risk of developing Parkinson's.

The investigators believe their findings concerning benomyl may be generalized to all Parkinson's patients. Developing new drugs to protect ALDH activity, they say, may eventually help slow the progression of the disease, whether or not an individual has been exposed to pesticides.


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David Rowing's comment, January 6, 2013 3:10 PM
I tried rescooping this to The Barley Mow but it wouldn't publish. So I've scooped it with an acknowledgement to this page.
Gina Stepp's comment, January 6, 2013 4:03 PM
Thanks David! Hope you're having a good evening~
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Studying an Online Masters Degree in Leadership

Studying an Online Masters Degree in Leadership | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
Online masters in leadership programs provide training for upper level administrative and management positions. This page tells you more about them.
Natalie Stewart's insight:

A leadership masters degree online emphasizes current and emerging leadership theories, examines best practices and tools used, and develops the skills needed to lead change in an organization.  

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New tuberculosis vaccine doesn't protect infants

New tuberculosis vaccine doesn't protect infants | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
The world's most advanced tuberculosis vaccine failed to protect babies against the infectious disease, according to a new study in South Africa.

The vaccine, MVA85A, was designed to improve protection from the only existing tuberculosis vaccine, BCG, which is routinely given to newborns. Though the new vaccine appeared safe, scientists found no proof it prevented tuberculosis, an airborne disease that kills more than 1 million people worldwide every year. Previous tests of the vaccine in adults had been promising and researchers said the trial provided useful data to inform future studies. There are a dozen other TB vaccines currently being tested. Some health officials were discouraged by the results. "It's pretty disappointing," said Dr. Jennifer Cohn, a medical coordinator at Doctors Without Borders, who was not part of the study. "Infants are at really high risk of TB but this doesn't seem to offer them any protection."


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Patient Care Technician Certification

Patient Care Technician Certification | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
Find out about patient care technician certification, learn about the courses, where they can be taken, the career prospects, and more ...
Natalie Stewart's insight:

Patient care technicians (PCTs) work under doctors or nurses in clinic, hospital, home and nursing facility settings.  They perform routine tasks such as applying dressings to wounds, drawing blood, doing electrocardiograms (EKGs), and moving and caring for patients. 

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RNA Fragments May Yield Rapid, Accurate Cancer Diagnosis: Scientific American

RNA Fragments May Yield Rapid, Accurate Cancer Diagnosis: Scientific American | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
A new method to noninvasively diagnose cancer and monitor its progression could eliminate the need for painful and sometimes life-threatening biopsies
Natalie Stewart's insight:

Cancer tumor cells shed microvesicles containing proteins and RNA fragments, called exosomes, into cerebral spinal fluid, blood, and urine. Within these exosomes is genetic information that can be analyzed to determine the cancer’s molecular composition and state of progression. 

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Home Health Aide Training Programs

Home Health Aide Training Programs | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
Home health aide training can start you in a career in health care or nursing. This page has details of the training, where you can find it, and more ...
Natalie Stewart's insight:

HHAs work in the home to provide comfort to all those needing it, especially those who are elderly, ill or recovering from an illness or accident.

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January 28, 2013 - Health Study Weekly is out

January 28, 2013 - Health Study Weekly is out | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

Health Study Weekly, a free online newspaper by Adam Atodl: updated with a curated selection of articles, blog posts, videos and photos about ideas, innnovations, education and training in health, healthcare, nursing and medicine.


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Online Nursing Continuing Education

Online Nursing Continuing Education | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
Find out more about online nursing continuing education, what's involved in the programs, where you can take them, the improved career prospects, and more ...
Natalie Stewart's insight:

Taking nursing continuing education online is a useful way for nurses to stay up-to-date in their profession whilst continuing with their employment. It is also useful as a means of professional advancement and personal development.

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HIV may have an ancient origin

HIV may have an ancient origin | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
The origins of HIV can be traced back millions rather than tens of thousands of years, research suggests.

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Adam Atodl's curator insight, January 25, 2013 5:53 PM

A genetic study shows HIV-like viruses arose in African monkeys and apes 5 million to 12 million years ago.

The research may one day lead to a better understanding of HIV and Aids.

HIV affects 34 million people worldwide.

The disease emerged during the 20th century after a HIV-like virus jumped from chimps to humans.

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Health Information Technology Degree

Health Information Technology Degree | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
Find out how health information technology degree programs are changing patient care. Find schools where you can take these programs, the career prospects, and more ...
Natalie Stewart's insight:

There is need for many more students to take health information technology programs so as to ensure that important data in hospitals and medical facilities are properly handled.  This degree paves the way for getting adequate skills to allow for vital data to be well maintained for ease in accessibility, sourcing, security and accuracy.  

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Do you care if your dinner is genetically engineered?

Do you care if your dinner is genetically engineered? | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
A state initiative will decide whether genetically engineered foods, like salmon, will be labeled in your grocery store.
Natalie Stewart's insight:

That’s the issue behind Initiative 522, which would require all genetically engineered foods be labeled in Washington state. While some argue that consumers have a right to choose whether or not they consume genetically engineered foods, others say this initiative is designed to make the public fear products that have been safely consumed for decades.  

Genetic engineering involves producing a piece of DNA and introducing it into an organism to create a desired trait, resulting in a genetically modified organism (GMO). Traditional crossbreeding has been used to create desired traits for centuries, but genetic engineering has proven to be far more precise.

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Natalie Stewart's curator insight, January 24, 2013 8:59 PM

A Massachusetts biotechnology company has created a salmon that grows twice as fast as its farm-raised peers by introducing DNA from Chinook Salmon and Ocean Pout fish into Atlantic salmon.  And, the resulting AquAdvantage Salmon, referred to by critics as the “frankenfish,” could soon be on sale at your local grocery store.

The Food and Drug Administration found these genetically engineered fish do not pose any major health or environmental risks, but some activists are asking whether consumers have the right to know if the salmon they’re eating was genetically modified.

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Bioinformatics Degree Programs

Bioinformatics Degree Programs | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
A bioinformatics degree can put you at the forefront of medical research. Find out where you can take one online, what the prospects are, and more on this page.
Natalie Stewart's insight:

The term "bioinformatics" came about in the late 1970s and it refers to informatic (i.e., information) processes in biotic (i.e., living) systems. 

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Coca-Cola Campaign Takes on Obesity

Coca-Cola Campaign Takes on Obesity | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
Coca-Cola has rolled out a new ad campaign targeting obesity.
Natalie Stewart's insight:

The soft drink giant unveiled a campaign that will take on what it's calling "the issue of this generation." The first ad in the campaign, the 2-minute spot above, notes that Coke can "play an important role" in the fight against obesity. The ad also points out that of its 650 beverages, Coca-Cola now offers 180 low- and no-calorie choices. In addition, the company has introduced smaller-portion drinks which Coke intends to have in 90% of the country by the end of the year. It's unclear whether another ad in the series will run during the Super Bowl. Coke has purchased three 30-second spots during the big game.

 
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