Health Studies Updates
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How Technology can be used effectively in Healthcare

How Technology can be used effectively in Healthcare | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

How Technology can be used effectively in Healthcare http://sco.lt/... #medtech #Healthit #Health #HITsm

 

 


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Six Free iPad Apps for Making Healthy Choices

Six Free iPad Apps for Making Healthy Choices | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
Back to school is the perfect time of year to establish routines and remind students about making healthy choices. Children of all ages should have an understanding of the impact of their decisions r

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Girl dies after rare surgery

Girl dies after rare surgery | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

Two-year-old Hannah Warren, the first child to receive a windpipe grown from her own stem cells, has died three months after a rare operation, the Children's Hospital of Illinois in Peoria said.

The child was diagnosed with an uncommon congenital abnormality known as tracheal agenesis, which means her windpipe failed to develop. She could not talk, eat or swallow on her own, according to a website by her parents, Darryl and Young-Mi Warren.

 

Read more at: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/ct-met-windpipe-patient-20130710,0,1707523.story


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New Technologies Revolutionizing Health & Fitness

New Technologies Revolutionizing Health & Fitness | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

From online doctor visits to space-age physical exam scanners, learn about eight game-changing technologies that will reduce costs and improve healthcare and fitness in years to come!


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Tumours communicate via 'tweets' (ScienceAlert)

Tumours communicate via 'tweets' (ScienceAlert) | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

Researchers at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital and the University of Sydney's Brain and Mind Research Institute (BMRI) have revealed that tumours communicate with other cells through small bits of information, known as microvesicles, labelled the biological equivalent of 'tweets'. 

"It seems that many cells release microvesicles allowing them to communicate and influence other cells nearby and in distant parts of the body in real-time - much like tweeting," Associate Professor Buckland said.

"These vesicles present a new target for treatments against brain tumours. Furthermore, they can be detected in the blood of patients with brain tumours, and may be an important diagnostic tool in the future," Associate Professor Buckland said.

 

Read more at: http://pda.sciencealert.com.au/news/20132406-24504.html

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Parents' fear of vaccinations nearly killed their son - Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Parents' fear of vaccinations nearly killed their son - Australian Broadcasting Corporation | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

Auckland parents Ian and Linda Williams thought they had made an informed choice not to vaccinate their children, but after their son ended up in intensive care with a tetanus infection they realised they had made a terrible mistake.

 

Read more at: http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2013/06/06/3776327.htm


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6 Business Models That Are Transforming Health Systems Around The World - Forbes

6 Business Models That Are Transforming Health Systems Around The World - Forbes | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

The new vision for health care isn’t just about access, quality and affordability. It’s also about social and financial inclusion. That was one of the key messages presented at last week’s Ashoka Future Forum, an event that brought together more than 400 innovators, entrepreneurs, philanthropists, and members of the media to discuss potential solutions to pressing social challenges.

Michel Nischan, a leader in the sustainable food movement and a panelist in a session about “health for all” as the new norm, said that the health care systems often treats patients as numbers instead of as people who would live better with the right resources. That statement was echoed today by PresidentBarack Obama: “Quality care is not something that should be a privilege. It should be a right.”

 

Read more at: http://www.forbes.com/sites/ashoka/2013/06/07/6-business-models-that-are-transforming-health-systems-around-the-world/


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Intelligent M: A new way to monitor proper hand hygiene

Led by Seth Freedman, Dave Mullinix and Dr. Andrew Fine, 

IntelligentM provides data-driven hand hygiene-related infection control solutions for hospitals that dramatically reduce Healthcare Acquired Infections (HAI’s).

HAI’s cost the US Healthcare System $30B annually and over 10% of the average hospital’s operating budget is related to infection control. The Center for Disease Control states that following proper hand hygiene protocol 100% of the time for healthcare workers is “the single most important way to avoid spreading infection."

Intelligent M is a revolutionary new way to monitor proper hand hygiene compliance in a healthcare setting.

 

Read more at http://www.intelligentm.com/Default.htm

 


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Human stem cells created by cloning

Human stem cells created by cloning | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

It was hailed some 15 years ago as the great hope for a biomedical revolution: the use of cloning techniques to create perfectly matched tissues that would someday cure ailments ranging from diabetes to Parkinson’s disease. Since then, the approach has been enveloped in ethical debate, tainted by fraud and, in recent years, overshadowed by a competing technology.

A paper published this week by Shoukhrat Mitalipov, a reproductive biology specialist at the Oregon Health and Science University in Beaverton, and his colleagues is sure to rekindle that debate. Mitalipov and his team have finally created patient-specific ESCs through cloning, and they are keen to prove that the technology is worth pursuing.

The researchers carried out a battery of tests to prove that their SCNT cells could form various cell types, including heart cells that are able to contract spontaneously.

 

Read more at: http://www.nature.com/news/human-stem-cells-created-by-cloning-1.12983

 
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The Story of the Brain - Dara O Briain's Science Club - Episode 5 - BBC Two

We've all got one, and some of us even use it, but throughout history the grey matter between our ears has puzzled even the brightest minds. In ancient times, no one knew the brain was what generated thought. The other organs were given credit. Follow the BBC's "The Story of the Brain" shows how science has tried to catch up to the brain.

 See on YouTube: http://youtu.be/Ei_bSHmmvJQ
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The FDA launches first inquiry into medical iPhone app

The FDA launches first inquiry into medical iPhone app | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) this week launched its first investigation into an unregulated Urinalysis app, a warning to health app makers.

The FDA’s letter was sent to Biosense Technologies Private Ltd., an Indian company with an app called uChek, which is designed to work alongside commercially available urinalysis test pads, also known as “dipsticks.” A typical application for dipsticks is to test for urinary tract infections.

The FDA’s letter to the makers of uChek is intended to serve as a warning to other developers with unregulated apps used in clinical settings. There are thousands of apps in the App Store that fall in the medical category.

 

Read more at: http://venturebeat.com/2013/05/29/the-fda-launches-first-inquiry-into-medical-iphone-app/

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Vitamin C Kills TB Cells: Scientific American Podcast

Vitamin C Kills TB Cells: Scientific American Podcast | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

"We’ve discovered that vitamin C killsMycobacterium tuberculosis cells.” TB researcher William Jacobs, with the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx. “And in fact it works not only on the multidrug-resistant strains, but the totally drug-resistant strains as well.”

 

Listen to the podcast: http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode.cfm?id=vitamin-c-kills-tb-cells-13-05-28

  

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EXPOSED: The Global Epidemic of TB

EXPOSED: The Global Epidemic of TB | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

Unless you’ve been distanced from the news and the internet, you have heard that tuberculosis has become increasingly drug resistant and is resurging in many areas of the world and this is much more than a minor inconvenience.

Kari Stoever, the Vice President of External Affairs at Aeras – a global nonprofit biotech advancing TB vaccines for the world, has put together a team to create an educational series of videos, which are available in its entirety for screenings, to raise awareness about the re-emerging infectiousness and virulence of pulmonary TB across the world.

 

Read more at: http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/psi-vid/2013/05/25/exposed-the-global-epidemic-of-tb/

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Studying a Masters Degree in Health Care Administration online

Studying a Masters Degree in Health Care Administration online | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

This page gives you information about the masters degree in health care administration, where you can study it, the prospects after completion, and more ...

 

Read more at: http://onlineanddistancelearning.com/masters-degree-in-health-care-administration

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Kangaroo Care Offers Developmental Benefits for Premature Newborns

Kangaroo Care Offers Developmental Benefits for Premature Newborns | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
Research shows chest-to-chest touching between baby and mother offers benefits beyond bonding and breastfeeding for the tiniest newborns.

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Be at the forefront with a Health Informatics Degree

Be at the forefront with a Health Informatics Degree | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

Workers in informatics are responsible for collecting, collating and maintaining patient data.

Find out more about health informatics degree programs, the schools where you can take them, the careers, the prospects, and more ...

 

Read more at: http://onlineanddistancelearning.com/health-informatics-degree


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E-health made easier – and more comfortable

E-health made easier – and more comfortable | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

The future of health care could be found in a tiny, paper-thin skin patch that collects vital information. The Bio-patch sensor developed by researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology is inexpensive, versatile and, best of all, comfortable to wear.

 

Geng Yang, a researcher at JRC iPack centre at KTH, says that the Bio-patch measures bioelectrical signals through the skin, gathering data on different parts of the body depending on where it is placed.

 

“On the chest it provides electrocardiography (ECG), on the skull it measures brainwaves (EEC), and on the forearm it can measure muscle response to stimulation from the nervous system (EMG),” he says. It also has a built-in sensor that constantly monitors body temperature.

 

With a wireless connection, the patient can analyse the readings in their smartphone, or send the data via internet to a healthcare professional for diagnosis.

 

The thinking behind Bio-patch is that health care can be moved out of the hospitals and into the home, Yang says. “Bio-patch is a step towards what is known as self-care, which is valuable especially for patients discharged after an operation, or for the elderly living unassisted,” he says.

 

Bio-patch has resulted in several publications in prestigious scientific journals and successful development of a prototype. Yang says several companies have already shown interest in the product.

  


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eMedToday's curator insight, June 27, 2013 8:50 PM

This type of sensor can be used in small telemedicine cubicles to send vital data to a HCP

eHWS's curator insight, July 3, 2013 8:56 AM

We started with mobile monitoring - 40 years ago!

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Start your nursing career with a Licensed Practical Nurse Program

Start your nursing career with a Licensed Practical Nurse Program | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

Licensed Practical Nursing offers a wide variety of jobs. Obtaining a position in a hospital can be particularly exciting as nurses are often expected to work in many different areas of the hospital.  

If a licensed practical nurse program is what you are looking for, this page has further details of the programs and where they can be taken ...

 

Read more at: http://onlineanddistancelearning.com/licensed-practical-nurse-program


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US Supreme Court rules human genes cannot be patented

US Supreme Court rules human genes cannot be patented | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
US biotech company Myriad Genetics loses right to patent human genes, but is allowed to patent gene copies.

In a unanimous ruling the nine justices of the Supreme Court said naturally occurring human DNA extracted from the human body cannot be patented, quashing patents held by the Utah-based biotechnology company Myriad Genetics on an increasingly popular breast cancer test. 

Researchers have previously been unable to develop competing tests that may potentially be more effective than Myriad's to determine if a women is a carrier of the mutations that predispose her to breast or ovarian cancer.

 Read more at: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-06-14/us-supreme-court-human-genes/4753106


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Stewart-Marshall's curator insight, June 13, 2013 6:40 PM

Thanks goodness for some common sense at last :-)

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Take the lead in nursing with an online MSN Program

Take the lead in nursing with an online MSN Program | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

A master of science in nursing (MSN) program prepares you to be a nurse leader - someone who can demonstrate the advanced critical thinking, communication, and decision making skills required for a position as an advanced practice registered nurse (APRN). 

Find out about online MSN programs, why they are important for nurses, what's in them, where they can be taken, what the career prospects are, and more ....

 

Read more at: http://onlineanddistancelearning.com/online-msn-programs


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Nutrition during first 1,000 days of life crucial for childhood and economic development

Nutrition during first 1,000 days of life crucial for childhood and economic development | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

A new Lancet series on maternal and childhood nutrition finds that over 3 million children die every year of malnutrition -- accounting for nearly half of all child deaths under 5. Along with state-of-the-art global estimates on the long-term burden of malnutrition, the series presents a new framework for prevention and treatment that considers underlying factors, such as food security, social conditions, resources, and governance. Professor Robert Black, Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, led the consortium of experts who produced this series -- a follow-up to the groundbreaking 2008 Lancet Nutrition Series, which revealed how pivotal the first 1,000 days -- from the start of pregnancy until the child's second birthday -- are to the well-being of both the individual and the society in which he or she lives.

 

Read more at: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130605230751.htm

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Improving the management of information with a Nursing Informatics Degree

Improving the management of information with a Nursing Informatics Degree | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

Nursing informatics seeks ways to improve communication and information management in nursing. The objective is to increase the quality of patient care while reducing costs. The work can be defined as a combination of computer science, information science, and nursing science.

Find out about nursing informatics degree programs, the content of the courses, the schools where you can take them, the career prospects, and more ...

 

Read more at: http://onlineanddistancelearning.com/nursing-informatics-degree


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The Latest Artificial Heart: Part Cow, Part Machine

The Latest Artificial Heart: Part Cow, Part Machine | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

A new kind of artificial heart that combines synthetic and biological materials as well as sensors and software to detect a patient’s level of exertion and adjust output accordingly is to be tested in patients at four cardiac surgery centers in Europe and the Middle East.

If the "bioprosthetic" device, made by the Paris-based Carmat, proves to be safe and effective, it could be given to patients waiting for a heart transplant. Currently, only one fully artificial heart, made by Tucson, Arizona-based SynCardia, has U.S., Canadian, and European regulatory approval for use in patients.

Attempts to completely replace the human heart with a prosthetic device started decades ago. It is hugely challenging to create a device that can withstand the harsh conditions of the body’s circulatory system and reliably pump 35 million times per year, as the heart does.

But the great need for a life-saving treatment in heart-failure patients has driven investigators, both in academia and private industry, to try to build a better artificial heart. Around 5.7 million people in the U.S. have heart failure at any given time, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

Read more at: http://mashable.com/2013/05/30/artificial-heart-cow-machine/

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Four great careers with a Masters In Health Degree

Four great careers with a Masters In Health Degree | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

A masters in health can lead to a satisfying career that is well-paying This page tells you more, and provides links for further information on just four of the fastest growing occupations in the USA with this degree. These are: a Medical Scientist, a Physician Assistant, a Biochemist or Biophysicist, and a Physical Therapist.

 

Read more at: http://online-masters-and-phds.com/masters-in-health

 
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Enough iodine vital in pregnancy – study

Enough iodine vital in pregnancy – study | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

Pregnant women and those planning to have children should ensure adequate iodine intake, according to the authors of a new report.

Lack of iodine, for which good dietary sources are milk, dairy products and fish, can lead to reduced mental development in their children, the study found.

Iodine is essential for producing the hormones made by the thyroid gland, which have a direct effect on foetal brain development.

A group of researchers from Surrey and Bristol universities, led by Professor Margaret Rayman of the University of Surrey, used samples and data from Bristol-based Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (Alspac), also known as "Children of the 90s". This is a long-term health research project in which more than 14,000 mothers enrolled during pregnancy in 1991 and 1992, and the health and development of their children has been followed in detail since.

The researchers found that children of women in the iodine-deficient group were significantly more likely to have low scores of verbal IQ, reading accuracy and reading comprehension. The lower the mother's concentration of iodine, the lower were the average scores for IQ and reading ability in the children.

 

Read more at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2013/may/22/boost-iodine-intake-pregnant-women

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