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Breastfeeding benefits for mum

Breastfeeding benefits for mum | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
Women who breastfed their babies have reduced rates of ovarian cancer, researchers have found.

Increased ovulation heightens the risk of cell mutation which can cause ovarian cancer. As breastfeeding often delays ovulation, we were able to effectively demonstrate that breastfeeding for 20 months would decrease the risk of ovarian cancer by 50 per cent, and that the 20 months of breastfeeding could be spread over a number of children and still have the same effect.
“The results of our study would recommend that mothers breastfeed for 12 months to gain substantial effect – and longer if they wish.”

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Health Studies Updates
Ideas, news and information for any health professional. Check my social networks at: http://xeeme.com/Natalie_Stewart
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Check out my social networks on XeeMe

Check out my social networks on XeeMe | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

My XeeMe helps you find all my social networks and groups on one page: http://xeeme.com/Natalie_Stewart

If you would like your own go to: 

http://xeeme.com/?r=giHf1iKM$gJ8

It's free. Plus you get a powerful social address book and much more.


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Evidence of Effectiveness of Health Care Professionals Using Handheld Computers

Evidence of Effectiveness of Health Care Professionals Using Handheld Computers | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

Handheld computers and mobile devices provide instant access to vast amounts and types of useful information for health care professionals. Their reduced size and increased processing speed has led to rapid adoption in health care. Thus, it is important to identify whether handheld computers are actually effective in clinical practice.

 

A scoping review of systematic reviews was designed to provide a quick overview of the documented evidence of effectiveness for health care professionals using handheld computers in their clinical work.

 

This scoping review summarizes the secondary evidence for effectiveness of handheld computers and mhealth. It provides a snapshot of effective use by health care professionals across four key functions. We identified evidence to suggest that handheld computers provide easy and timely access to information and enable accurate and complete documentation. Further, they can give health care professionals instant access to evidence-based decision support and patient management systems to improve clinical decision making. Finally, there is evidence that handheld computers allow health professionals to be more efficient in their work practices. It is anticipated that this evidence will guide clinicians and managers in implementing handheld computers in clinical practice and in designing future research.

 

Original: http://www.jmir.org/2013/10/e212/


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IT-Lyftet och IT-Piloterna's curator insight, October 31, 2013 3:39 AM

Denna engelskspråkiga artikel framhåller bevis för hur effektiva handhållna datorer - läs "smart-devices" - är för hälsoutvecklingen inom vården.

ebee's curator insight, November 4, 2013 12:20 PM

Scientific evidence confirming effectiveness of handheld computers for HCPs.

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New Technology Lets Doctors Watch Patients From Afar - National Journal

New Technology Lets Doctors Watch Patients From Afar - National Journal | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
New Technology Lets Doctors Watch Patients From Afar
National Journal
With wireless technology, data are objective, acquired, and displayed nearly continuously." That could help doctors better target their care, bringing down costs.

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Online Nursing Continuing Education | Online and Distance Learning

Online Nursing Continuing Education | Online and Distance Learning | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
Find out more about online nursing continuing education, what's involved in the programs, where you can take them, the improved career prospects, and more ...

 

Read more at: http://onlineanddistancelearning.com/online-nursing-continuing-education

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Opportunities and challenges of pluripotent stem cell neurodegenerative disease models

Opportunities and challenges of pluripotent stem cell neurodegenerative disease models | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

Human neurodegenerative disorders are among the most difficult to study. In particular, the inability to readily obtain the faulty cell types most relevant to these diseases has impeded progress for decades. Recent advances in pluripotent stem cell technology now grant access to substantial quantities of disease-pertinent neurons both with and without predisposing mutations. While this suite of technologies has revolutionized the field of 'in vitro disease modeling', great care must be taken in their deployment if robust, durable discoveries are to be made. Here we review what we perceive to be several of the stumbling blocks in the use of stem cells for the study of neurological disease and offer strategies to overcome them. (...) - by Jackson Sandoe & Kevin Eggan, Nature Neuroscience 16, 780–789, 25 June 2013

 

 


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How To Become An RN

How To Become An RN | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
The demand for Registered Nurses is strong and growing. Find out about how to become an RN and find online programs to prepare for the NCLEX-RN examination.
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Could The Future Of Health Care Mean No Waits In Hospitals?

Could The Future Of Health Care Mean No Waits In Hospitals? | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

As medical treatment is impacted by technology, consumerization, and the mobile revolution, we may see a world where your doctor already knows why you’re sick and can treat you over the phone--leaving the hospitals for the true emergencies.

 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, chronic diseases contribute to seven out of 10 deaths every year in the United States. Data also shows that the largest volume of readmissions occurs among patients with chronic disease and more than 75% of health care costs are in fact attributed to chronic illness. Sense.ly helps address these systemic issues by enabling patients to manage their chronic diseases through a telehealth platform offering access to home-based behavior and medication services and consultation. The telehealth market, which is slated to impact 1.8 million patients worldwide by 2017, compared to 308,000 today, offers a glimpse into what the most profitable hospitals of the future might look like--empty.
  


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Study a Nutrition Degree Program for a Career in Health

Study a Nutrition Degree Program for a Career in Health | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
Find out about nutrition degree programs, where you can study them, and the careers and salary prospects after completion ...

 

Read more at: http://onlineanddistancelearning.com/nutrition-degree-programs

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The Gulf Between Doctors and Nurse Practitioners

The Gulf Between Doctors and Nurse Practitioners | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

Nurse practitioners believe that they can lead primary care practices and admit patients to a hospital and that they deserve to earn the same amount as doctors for the same work. Physicians disagree.

Read more at: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/06/27/the-gulf-between-doctors-and-nurse-practitioners/


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Start your health or nursing career with Patient Care Technician Certification

Start your health or nursing career with Patient Care Technician Certification | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

Find out about patient care technician certification, learn about the courses, where they can be taken, the career prospects, and more ...

 

Read more at: http://onlineanddistancelearning.com/patient-care-technician-certification

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Apple is suddenly really interested in health tech

Apple is suddenly really interested in health tech | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

Apple is suddenly really interested in health tech

And the fitness-tracking wristband seems to be inspiring how the company is thinking about its own wearable device: it's begun hiring several experts in health tech.


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Thibaud Guymard's curator insight, July 21, 2013 2:25 PM

Will Apple become a big player in the ehealth field? Some interesting signs so far. To be followed!

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Health Unit Coordinator Certification

Health Unit Coordinator Certification | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

This page gives you information about obtaining health unit coordinator certification, where you can study it online, the job and salary prospects, and more ...

 

Read more at: http://onlineanddistancelearning.com/health-unit-coordinator-certification

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"The Healthcare revolution will not be televised"

My Presentation from Athens looking at 5 things digital can do to revolutionise pharmaceuticals (with a bit of Gil Scott Heron thrown in for good measure)


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Alex Butler's comment, August 13, 2013 4:31 AM
Thanks for watching Dan, appreciated :-)
Sophie Undreiner's curator insight, March 15, 5:23 AM

@TedMed par Alex Butler

Vigisys's curator insight, November 2, 5:10 AM

Une intéressante présentation (en anglais) qui aborde les principaux concepts qui seront fondateurs de l'e-santé à venir. Une belle inspiration pour le développement des futurs réseaux de santé numériques.

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Helpouts: a HIPAA compliant video platform that can be used by Physicians & Patients

Helpouts: a HIPAA compliant video platform that can be used by Physicians & Patients | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

Google Helpouts is a new video service by Google that connects individuals seeking help with experts via real time online video. Healthcare providers are using the platform to connect with Patients. Helpouts is built on top of Google’s Hangouts platform and is HIPAA compliant.

 

Google says it was created to provide “real help from real people in real time.” People who offer help through the service are calledproviders and can be businesses as well as individuals. Providers must pass a screening process in order to qualify as Helpouts providers.

 

Once approved, providers create and maintain listings that explain their offerings, qualifications, prices and schedules. Payments are made through Google Wallet and pricing is based either per minute, per session, or free. While Google charges 20% of the fees, health-related providers are not yet being charged. Helpouts Providers can be rated at the end of a session by the user.

  

more at http://www.imedicalapps.com/2013/11/google-helpouts-hipaa-video-physicians-patients/


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10 patient groups most likely to be mobile health users

10 patient groups most likely to be mobile health users | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

People living with cystic fibrosis, growth hormone deficiencies and acne were among the most likely to report using their smartphones to find health information in a new survey from Manhattan Research.

 

Based on phone and online surveys of more than 8,600 U.S. adults, the firm estimated that some 95 million Americans look for health information on their smartphones — 25 percent more than were doing so last year.

 

The firm found that adoption of mobile solutions varied among patient groups. These patient groups were the ones most likely to report using mobile health solutions:

 Cystic fibrosisGrowth hormone deficiencyAcneADD/ADHDHepatitis CMigraineCrohn’s diseaseChronic kidney diseaseGeneralized anxiety disorderBipolar disorder



It’s not surprising to see many chronic conditions on the list. It is very surprising, however, not to see conditions like diabetes, asthma and sleep disorders.

Read more at : http://medcitynews.com/2013/10/manhattan-researchs-top-markets-for-mhealth-adoption/


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eMedToday's curator insight, October 28, 2013 7:52 PM
Cystic fibrosisGrowth hormone deficiencyAcneADD/ADHDHepatitis CMigraineCrohn’s diseaseChronic kidney diseaseGeneralized anxiety disorderBipolar disorder

 

Interesting diabetes was not on the list

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South Africa mHealth Landscape

South Africa mHealth Landscape | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

The mobile phone holds the power of ubiquity. Across the developing world, around 40% of people now actively subscribe to mobile services. If we include people who do not own but have access to a phone the connected population is pushed to over 50%. This is in contrast to traditional core services such as banking, electricity and sanitation which are near universal in developed regions such as Europe and the United States, but well below 50% in several developing regions.

 Read more at:  http://zunia.org/post/south-africa-mhealth-landscape Link: http://www.gsma.com/mobilefordevelopment/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/South-Africa-mHealth-Landscape_J...


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Healthcare analytics reduces hypertension for KPNC patients

Healthcare analytics reduces hypertension for KPNC patients | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, so why not leverage health information technology in the form of healthcare analytics to intervene more effectively in the treatment of patients with this condition? That’s exactly what a Kaiser Permanente North California (KPNC) program determined to figure out and has now shared in research published in the Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA).

 

 


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Implantable Device Manipulates and Records Brain Activity

Implantable Device Manipulates and Records Brain Activity | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

For the first time, researchers have implanted an electrode that can record neural activity while it simultaneously delivers electric current to the brain.

Minneapolis-based medical device company Medtronic developed the device, which can also adjust its electrical output in response to the changing conditions of the brain. This automated control could one day improve deep brain stimulation treatment and even enable doctors to use the device to treat more conditions, experts say.

 Read more at: http://mashable.com/2013/08/10/brain-implant-device/


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Men's sperm quality decreases at age 35 - health

Men's sperm quality decreases at age 35 - health | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
Both the quality and quantity of sperm start to decline earlier than was thought, and older men become more likely to have girls

It has been controversial whether the quality and quantity of a man's sperm deteriorates with age. "However, there is fairly convincing epidemiological evidence that older men do find it harder to conceive a child – regardless of female age – and as men get older their partners are at increased risk of miscarriage," says Allan Pacey, a fertility specialist at the University of Sheffield, UK. There is also a slightly increased risk of older men fathering children with genetic disorders.

 Read more at: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21929275.500-mens-sperm-quality-decreases-at-age-35.html

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The top food choking hazards for kids

The top food choking hazards for kids | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

Do you know what food kids most commonly choke on? 

 Hard candy. That's the finding of a study just published in the journal Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Researchers looked at choking-related visits to the emergency rooms that involved food between 2001 and 2009 for children ages 0-14 years.  There were a lot of visits: more than 100,000, averaging about 12,000 a year. While most of the children were treated and released, 10 percent were hospitalized. More than a third were children under a year, although the mean age was 4.5 years--so choking isn't just a baby and toddler thing.  

 

Read more at: http://www.boston.com/lifestyle/health/mdmama/2013/07/the_top_food_choking_hazards_for_kids.html


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Eye Receptor Transplants May Restore Eyesight to the Blind

Eye Receptor Transplants May Restore Eyesight to the Blind | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

Scientists at the University College London have perhaps discovered a method for restoring the vision of blind people.

As reported by New Scientist, researchers have been able to grow light-sensing cells found in the retina of the eye from scratch, thus enabling them to successfully transplant the embryonic stem cells into the eyes of blind mice.

Watch the video to see how the process works. The lab-grown photoreceptor cells are planted into the eyes of mice, where they successfully connect with nerves that send visual signals to the brain. The scientists now hope to replicate this process in humans.

 

Read more at: http://mashable.com/2013/07/25/eye-receptor-transplants/

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Apple’s top 118 apps for doctors, nurses, patients

Apple’s top 118 apps for doctors, nurses, patients | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

Excellent curation covering :

 

Reference Apps;

Medical Education Apps;

EMR & Patient Monitoring Apps;

Nursing Apps;

Imaging Apps;

Patient Education Apps;

Personal Care Apps.


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8 Things You Probably Didn’t Realize Siri Could Do

8 Things You Probably Didn’t Realize Siri Could Do | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

by Matt Smith

 

"Siri has become one of the iPhone’s defining features, but for many people, it’s not always the most useful. While some of this is due to the limitations of voice recognition, the oddity of using voice to command a device is also partly to blame. Users often assume Siri isn’t good for much more than finding directions or calling contacts.

 

"That couldn’t be further from the truth. There are aton of functions and features packed into Siri and, once you learn how to use them, you may be surprised how much you can accomplish without ever touching your phone"


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Lung cancer 'secrets' to be probed

Lung cancer 'secrets' to be probed | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it

Scientists across Britain are to map the genes of the tumours of 850 lung cancer patients in a bid to understand more about the deadly disease.

The £14m research at six centres aims to find out how lung cancers become resistant to treatment; they are the most common cause of UK cancer death.

The study will trace how lung tumours develop and evolve over nine years.

  Read more at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-23340923
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Genetic advance in Down's syndrome

Genetic advance in Down's syndrome | Health Studies Updates | Scoop.it
US scientists say they have moved a step closer to being able to treat disorders such as Down's syndrome caused by extra chromosomes.

They have "switched off" the chromosome that causes the symptoms of Down's syndrome in human cells in the lab.

The research, published in Nature, could one day lead to new medical treatments for the condition.

Future work may be of real benefit to people with Down's syndrome, said the UK Down's Syndrome Association.

 Read more at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-23340924
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