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What's The ROI Of A Smartphone Given To Patients With A Chronic Health Condition?

What's The ROI Of A Smartphone Given To Patients With A Chronic Health Condition? | Health studies, findings, advancements | Scoop.it
Thanks to a pilot project announced today by Microsoft, TracFone and Health Choice Network (here) we're about to find out. Set to launch in January, the pilot project is designed to test the theory that smartphones can lower costs and manage chronic conditions like diabetes with better health outcomes. One big [...]
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Google to collect data to create a full picture of what a healthy human being is

Google to collect data to create a full picture of what a healthy human being is | Health studies, findings, advancements | Scoop.it
Called Baseline Study, Google's project will gather anonymous genetic and molecular information to create a full picture of what a healthy human is.

 

The early-stage project is run by Andrew Conrad, a 50-year-old molecular biologist who pioneered cheap, high-volume tests for HIV in blood-plasma donations.

 

Dr. Conrad joined Google X—thecompany's research arm—in March 2013, and he has built a team of about 70-to-100 experts from fields including physiology, biochemistry, optics, imaging and molecular biology.

 

Other mass medical and genomics studies exist. But Baseline will amass a much larger and broader set of new data. The hope is that this will help researchers detect killers such as heart disease and cancer far earlier, pushing medicine more toward prevention rather than the treatment of illness.

 

"With any complex system, the notion has always been there to proactively address problems," Dr. Conrad said. "That's not revolutionary. We are just asking the question: If we really wanted to be proactive, what would we need to know? You need to know what the fixed, well-running thing should look like."

 

The project won't be restricted to specific diseases, and it will collect hundreds of different samples using a wide variety of new diagnostic tools. Then Google will use its massive computing power to find patterns, or "biomarkers," buried in the information. The hope is that these biomarkers can be used by medical researchers to detect any disease a lot earlier.

 

The study may, for instance, reveal a biomarker that helps some people break down fatty foods efficiently, helping them live a long time without high cholesterol and heart disease. Others may lack this trait and succumb to early heart attacks. Once Baseline has identified the biomarker, researchers could check if other people lack it and help them modify their behavior or develop a new treatment to help them break down fatty foods better, Dr. Conrad said.

 

Google has already built one of the world's largest networks of computers and data centers to serve online-search results quickly and run other data-hungry services like the video website YouTube. This computing muscle can now be used to store and crunch medical information and let other researchers access it more easily.

 


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'Noninvasive' Brain Control Exists—and That Should Make You Happy

'Noninvasive' Brain Control Exists—and That Should Make You Happy | Health studies, findings, advancements | Scoop.it
A diabolical-sounding breakthrough may actually be able to treat a range of disabling diseases
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Who Can Speak for the Patient?

Who Can Speak for the Patient? | Health studies, findings, advancements | Scoop.it
Our patient was never going to wake up, and no decision should ever be made without consulting the spouse. But I hadn’t known she existed.
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Access to Good Food as Preventive Medicine

Access to Good Food as Preventive Medicine | Health studies, findings, advancements | Scoop.it
According to a new study, nearly one in three U.S. adults with a chronic disease has problems paying for food, medicine, or both. That doesn't have to be the case.
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Run When You're 25 For A Sharper Brain When You're 45

Run When You're 25 For A Sharper Brain When You're 45 | Health studies, findings, advancements | Scoop.it
Here's the latest bit of evidence that exercise keeps the brain fit. Much of the research has been in older people, but this study found that being fit in your 20s makes you sharper in middle age.
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#runforlife #running #whyirun #fitness

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14 Signs You're Emotionally Intelligent

14 Signs You're Emotionally Intelligent | Health studies, findings, advancements | Scoop.it
What makes some people more successful in work and life than others? IQ and work ethic are important, but they don't tell the whole story.
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The Diagnosis Difference | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project

A portrait of the 45% of U.S. adults living with chronic health conditions

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bacigalupe's curator insight, November 26, 2013 12:55 PM

45% of U.S. adults report that they live with one or more chronic conditions, such as high blood pressure and diabetes, but also less common conditions like lupus and cancer. They are more likely than other adults to be older, to have faced a medical emergency in the past year, and, as other studies have shown, to contribute to the explosion of health care costs in the U.S.

A new national survey by the Pew Research Center, supported by the California HealthCare Foundation, explores how adults with chronic conditions gather, share, and create health information, both online and offline.

The Pew Research Center’s analysis indicates a “diagnosis difference” that is tied to several aspects of health care and technology use. For example, holding other variables constant (including age, income, education, ethnicity, and overall health status), the fact that someone has a chronic condition is independently associated with being offline.

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Being Web-Savvy Tied to Better Health in Seniors: Study

Being Web-Savvy Tied to Better Health in Seniors: Study | Health studies, findings, advancements | Scoop.it
TUESDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Older men and women who use the Internet frequently are more likely to have a lifestyle that includes many cancer-preventive behaviors, according to a new study...

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Studying the impact of YouTube on health education: Can you help?

Studying the impact of YouTube on health education: Can you help? | Health studies, findings, advancements | Scoop.it

The “Be Sweet to Babies” research team from the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (lead by Dr. Denise Harrison) is conducting a study using YouTube as a means to widely disseminate health information to parents and health care workers about effective ways to reduce pain during infant immunizations.

 

Can you help?

 

Research shows these techniques work, yet they are rarely used by health care providers and parents.

 

The goal of the study is to use YouTube as a means to disseminate health education to a wide audience, empower parents to advocate for the use of best practices for immunization and ultimately change the way babies are being immunized.

 

By studying the results of this project, the team hope to learn more about health education strategies.  What is learnt from this project has the potential to instruct how future health information is shared with the public.

 

But the video needs to be seen for the study to work.  You can support our research project in the following ways:

 

Watch the video http://youtu.be/8Wzjxvrl91UShare it with colleagues, staff, studentsPost a link to the video on your websiteLike or comment on the video 

If you are interested in this topic and want to read more about YouTube’s role in health education, here are a few other references:

 

YouTube as education channel on STDs:http://www.inform.nu/Articles/Vol16/ISJv16p019-036Prybutok0119.pdfYouTube and education of health professionals: http://www.slideshare.net/luis.luque/youtube-and-medical-educationYouTube to help speed diagnosis of infantile spasms: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21551373
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Yale doctor's mindfulness training research helps smokers quit - New Haven Register

Yale doctor's mindfulness training research helps smokers quit - New Haven Register | Health studies, findings, advancements | Scoop.it
Yale doctor's mindfulness training research helps smokers quit New Haven Register In Brewer's four-week study, 88 smokers with an average age of 46, smoking a pack a day, used either mindfulness training or the American Lung Association's Freedom...

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Probiotics Primer: What Science Says About Using Bacteria to Treat Disease

Probiotics Primer: What Science Says About Using Bacteria to Treat Disease | Health studies, findings, advancements | Scoop.it
Confused about the "good bacteria" that can help health rather than make you sick? Here's the latest on which bugs are the most effective, and for which conditions.
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Return On Community in Healthcare

Return On Community in Healthcare | Health studies, findings, advancements | Scoop.it
Return on Community in Healthcare "The notion is simple yet revolutionary: Make an investment in community and you will realize a return on your investment. One of the most obvious returns comes in...
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#returnoncommunity and what that means for #healthcare

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Here Is The Simplest Advice For Anyone Trying To Lose Weight Or Eat Healthy

Here Is The Simplest Advice For Anyone Trying To Lose Weight Or Eat Healthy | Health studies, findings, advancements | Scoop.it
Another day, another diet. Who can keep track? Here's what you really need to know.
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Super basic, super advice. #eatrealfood

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Life With a Dog: You Meet People

Life With a Dog: You Meet People | Health studies, findings, advancements | Scoop.it
The health benefits of owning a pet, particularly a dog, are well documented and wide-ranging, from cardiovascular to social.
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Dog lovers will agree ... life is better with a canine compainion! What do you love most about your #dog?

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One state's health care revolution

One state's health care revolution | Health studies, findings, advancements | Scoop.it
Could one of America's poorest, sickest states change the way we finance care?
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A new take on the way our healthcare system functions.

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Male and Female Brains Really Are Built Differently

Male and Female Brains Really Are Built Differently | Health studies, findings, advancements | Scoop.it
The hemispheres of women's brains are more interconnected. Does that matter?
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Study Underscores Health, Wellness and Career Benefits of Volunteering

Study Underscores Health, Wellness and Career Benefits of Volunteering | Health studies, findings, advancements | Scoop.it

“If you work with volunteers—or if are one yourself—you may not be surprised by a report from UnitedHealth Group indicating that people who spend some time giving back to their communities tend to be healthier than those who don’t.”


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Garth Sanginiti's curator insight, November 7, 2013 9:53 PM
"Companies that encourage and sponsor volunteer activities are also likely to engender goodwill and loyalty among employees. And of the employed volunteers in the survey who volunteered through their workplace, 81% agreed that volunteering together strengthens relationships among colleagues."
John Michel's curator insight, November 7, 2013 10:15 PM

Yet another great illustration of the positive power in serving others...for everyone involved. 

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Health Startup Noom Receives NIH Grant To Study Smartphone Tech In Eating Disorder Treatment

Health Startup Noom Receives NIH Grant To Study Smartphone Tech In Eating Disorder Treatment | Health studies, findings, advancements | Scoop.it
In the field of fitness trackers and apps, evidence of their efficacy is often anecdotal.

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For Some Cancer Patients, Personalized Medicine Has Arrived

For Some Cancer Patients, Personalized Medicine Has Arrived | Health studies, findings, advancements | Scoop.it

New tools for analyzing genes are allowing doctors to personalize treatment for some lung cancer patients.

 

Imagine your doctor being able to scan your DNA from a biopsy and pinpoint the medicine that will work best for you. This type of high-tech approach is a clinical reality for advanced lung cancer at The Ohio State Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James).

 

The technology, known as next generation "multiplex" gene sequencing, analyzes 50-plus genes in DNA extracted from a tumor biopsy for particular genetic mutations.

 

Previous technology required pathologists to analyze one mutation per tube in a sequencing reaction, but next-generation genome sequencing assesses more than 2,500 mutations in a single reaction. 

 

Knowing which mutations are present in lung tumors can help doctors tailor a patient's treatment to the unique genetic features present in his or her cancer cells.

 

The knowledge can also help in the development of new drugs that target previously unrecognized gene mutations in lung tumors. I often compare these genes to the gas pedal in a car — when activated, these genes make the cancer grow. By breaking the linkage between the gas pedal and the motor (or interfering with these "driver" mutations) with specific targeted drugs, doctors can stop this growth and often make the cancer shrink.

 

That's especially important in lung cancer because the majority of patients with this disease are diagnosed in the later stages, meaning it's important to start effective therapies quickly.

 

For example, a patient could be given a standard chemotherapy and expect a 25- to 30- percent response rate/shrinkage of a tumor. But if the treatment team knows that a patient has a mutation in a gene called EGFR, we can offer him or her a pill (erlotinib and afatinib are approved for this use in the United States), which has a 75-percent response rate and fewer side effects.

 

Gene sequencing is now considered the standard of care for stage-4 lung cancer patients at The OSUCCC – James and a handful of other centers across the United States — and several clinical trials evaluating molecular targeted therapies for patients with stage-3 lung cancers will soon start at The OSUCCC – James.

 

 

Lung cancer remains the number one cause of cancer death in the United States, and in the world, among both men and women. More than 200,000 cases are diagnosed annually in the United States. Each year during the month of November, physicians and others observe lung cancer awareness month, which sheds light on this terrible disease.

  


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