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Nothing about me without me « The counterfactual

Nothing about me without me « The counterfactual | Health Promotion and The Ottawa Charter | Scoop.it

I want to give over a guest post to Gerry Stimson, David Dorn and Rick Lines to reproduce their excellent rejoinder to Professor Martin McKee. This is far more than a richly deserved put-down to the casual arrogance of McKee.  It includes a quite fundamental challenge to the health, medical and campaigning organisations that work on ‘tobacco control’.  Why are they so far apart from the people they are supposedly trying to save or help?


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Preventative health plays big role in reforms - Dayton Daily News

Preventative health plays big role in reforms - Dayton Daily News | Health Promotion and The Ottawa Charter | Scoop.it
San Francisco Chronicle
Preventative health plays big role in reforms
Dayton Daily News
Joan Merrill, gets her blood pressure checked by Kasandra Chambers, a student in the Cedarville University School of Pharmacy, on Sept.
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How Facebook Can Help Public Health

How Facebook Can Help Public Health | Health Promotion and The Ottawa Charter | Scoop.it

If you ever feel guilty about spending just a little bit too much time on social media, consider this: the time you spend interacting online may soon be used to better track, predict and monitor public health issues like disease outbreaks and vaccination pushes.

 

A set of commentaries coming out in Science today expose how influential other people’s views can be when it comes to how we accept and act on public health advice, and describes how researchers could start to harness the power of big data to reveal more about public opinion and response to health issues.

 

“Within the last five or six years, people have been interested in the idea of social networks and how they relate to disease,” said Bernard Fuemmeler, PhD, MPH, co-director of mHealth@Duke, an interdisciplinary health interest group at Duke University, who was not involved in the commentaries. “From their inception, there has been a lot of interest in using them to help us understand disease and health,” Fuemmeler said, noting that the work around social networks and biology is inherently interdisciplinary.

 

In their commentary, researchers Chris Bauch, a mathematician at University of Waterloo in Canada, and Alison Galvani, an epidemiologist at Yale University proposed that there are several ways to collect and analyze the data available through social media networks like Facebook and Twitter in order to better understand human behavior, particularly as it applies to health.

 

“We’re looking to use social media to better understand social behavior," Bauch said. "The problem with trying to understand human behavior is that we don’t have good data on it,” Bauch said. Surveys tend to fall short of capturing the true public opinion around health crises like a spreading disease or a new vaccination, he said, but social media may be a better place to mine these opinions, he said.

 

In their commentary, Bauch and Galvani pointed to how a health crisis playing out on social media often creates a larger beast. “When a social contagion is coupled to a biological contagion, the resulting disease-behavior system can exhibit dynamics that do not occur when the two subsystems are isolated from one another,” they wrote, noting that the sum is greater than the parts.

 

For example, a celebrity’s opinion on a vaccine may ripple through social media and have a greater impact on public opinion than originally thought. Or, when a public health crisis is playing out, social media can provide clues as to whether a culture will listen to health officials’ instructions. For example, in the SARS-coronavirus outbreak, it would be helpful to know what a population’s acceptance level of quarantine and isolation would be.

 

Another commentary, by Dan Kahan, a law and psychology professor at Yale, in Science details the problem with how the HPV vaccine was released. Kahan argues that the vaccine saw so much controversy because the major manufacturer of it, Merck, aimed to fast-track approval, and had a product that was targeted toward young girls.  “It was likely inevitable that people of opposing cultural orientations would react divergently to a high-profile campaign to enact legislation mandating vaccination of 11- to 12-year-old girls for a sexually transmitted disease,” Kahan writes in the commentary. “Yet there was nothing inevitable about the HPV vaccine being publicly introduced in a manner so likely to generate cultural conflict.”

 

The hope is that if more data collection and analysis was done, we could better predict responses like the one that hindered the HPV vaccine’s success, and come up with a better way of delivering the message, and as a result, hopefully a better way of delivering the healthcare.

“Maybe there’s a more optimal way to roll out these interventions,” Bauch said.

 

Fuemmeler agreed, noting that analysis of social networks could also show us which leaders in the field might be most effective at delivering messages. “We can direct our networking to centralized nodes,” he said. “It’s an interesting way to direct public health campaigns.”

One of the constant challenges of Twitter, of course, is that “misinformation can spread just as fast as good information, and the media doesn’t distinguish,” Fuemmeler noted. Determining a way to validate accurate information will be another challenge to conquer.


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New Zealand failing in obesity prevention - Medical Xpress

New Zealand failing in obesity prevention - Medical Xpress | Health Promotion and The Ottawa Charter | Scoop.it
New Zealand failing in obesity prevention Medical Xpress A disinvestment in obesity prevention and failure to enact any major healthy food policies is contributing to New Zealand's worsening obesity statistics compared to other OECD countries,...
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What does 'prevention' mean? - The Guardian

What does 'prevention' mean? - The Guardian | Health Promotion and The Ottawa Charter | Scoop.it
The Guardian
What does 'prevention' mean?
The Guardian
Health and social care has become something of a hot topic this year and, among those in charge of driving reform, there is general agreement that "prevention is better than cure".
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Health literacy - The solid facts


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The journey from Ottawa to Health 2020

Over the past 25 years the Ottawa Charter has had a profound effect on public health, described as a tipping point for global health development. This meetin...

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WHO | The Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion

WHO | The Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion | Health Promotion and The Ottawa Charter | Scoop.it

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Preventive Health – Tuesday, May 14, - Reporter Newspapers

Preventive Health – Tuesday, May 14,
Reporter Newspapers
2-3 p.m. – Learn how taking advantage of preventative services can improve the quality of your health.
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Indigenous Australians risk dementia

Indigenous people aged over 60 are three times more likely to develop dementia than the non-Indigenous population. A new study suggests that head injury may be a contributing factor.
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Health Promotion Directorate On Trachoma Awareness Campaign - AllAfrica.com

Health Promotion Directorate On Trachoma Awareness Campaign AllAfrica.com Health Promotion and Education Directorate under the auspices of the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, in collaboration with National Eye Care Programme ,over the...
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'Closing the gap' for people with mental illness - HealthCanal.com

'Closing the gap' for people with mental illness - HealthCanal.com | Health Promotion and The Ottawa Charter | Scoop.it
'Closing the gap' for people with mental illness
HealthCanal.com
Mentally ill Australians are dying an average of 16 years earlier than the general population, and the gap is growing.
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Closing the gap on Indigenous education - Daily Liberal

Closing the gap on Indigenous education - Daily Liberal | Health Promotion and The Ottawa Charter | Scoop.it
Closing the gap on Indigenous education
Daily Liberal
... of Aboriginal Education Rod Towney and Institute director Kate Baxter . Photo: JAMIE JONES.
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Indigenous Australians face higher risk of cancer

Indigenous Australians face higher risk of cancer | Health Promotion and The Ottawa Charter | Scoop.it
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have higher rates of new cancer cases and cancer deaths than non-Indigenous Australians, according to a report released by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) and Cancer Australia.
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Indigenous call for medical cultural competency

Indigenous call for medical cultural competency | Health Promotion and The Ottawa Charter | Scoop.it
The Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM) is calling for more cultural competency in medical treatment.
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Segregated neighborhoods are more likely to be poor, and if you barely earn a living wage, you definitely can’t afford health insurance that would cover preventative care (Thanks Affordable Care...

Segregated neighborhoods are more likely to be poor, and if you barely earn a living wage, you definitely can’t afford health insurance that would cover preventative care (Thanks Affordable Care... | Health Promotion and The Ottawa Charter | Scoop.it
Jazmine Walker
This quote is from her essay Saving The Boobies Will Not Save Me on Still Furious and Still Brave. Here she notes that Black women develop breast cancer less often than White women, but...

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More than 100,000 Americans quit smoking due to national media campaign

More than 100,000 Americans quit smoking due to national media campaign | Health Promotion and The Ottawa Charter | Scoop.it
An estimated 1.6 million smokers attempted to quit smoking because of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s “Tips From Former Smokers” national ad campaign, according to a study released by the CDC.  As a result of the 2012 campaign, more than 200,000 Americans had quit smoking immediately following the three-month campaign, of which researchers estimated that more than 100,000 will likely quit smoking permanently.

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What is eHealth?

An animated journey through the exciting world of ehealth. eHealth is better healthcare and a healthier life through digital technology. Copyright ehi2, crea...

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Can Social Media Really Influence Health Behaviors? A Small Clinical Trial Argues The Answer Is Yes. | The Health Care Blog

Can Social Media Really Influence Health Behaviors? A Small Clinical Trial Argues The Answer Is Yes. | The Health Care Blog | Health Promotion and The Ottawa Charter | Scoop.it

Thanks to the technologic allure of iPhones replacing stethoscopes, apps substituting for doctorsand electronic information substituting for having to actually talk to patients, this thoroughly modern correspondent is all about medical-social media.

Think Facebook for the flu.  Twitter for tinnitus. Egads, listen to the typical consultant, pundit or futurist and it’s easy to believe that we’re on the verge of a silicon-based health care revolution.


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Focus on prevention to control the growing health budget

Australia spends more than $130 billion each year on health, approximately 9.2% of our GDP.
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The dark physical side of mental health (Aus)

The dark physical side of mental health (Aus) | Health Promotion and The Ottawa Charter | Scoop.it
Unintentional discrimination in the health system may be contributing to poor physical health and reduced lifespans for people with schizophrenia, a new mental health campaign has said.

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Marilyne Kubath's curator insight, May 9, 2013 6:04 AM

The statsics seem to be diffent in Scotland.

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Budget 2013-14: information of relevance to Indigenous health

The Federal Budget for 2013-14 was delivered on Tuesday evening, 14 May 2013, by Treasurer Wayne Swan.
Detailed information on various components of Indigenous expenditure is available in the respective Portfolio Budget Statements 2013-14.
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Stay healthy and save money with preventative dental care ...

Some studies even indicate that neglecting your oral health may lead to other health issues including cardiovascular problems and diabetes. Faithfully following your “Preventative Dental Care Plan” helps keep you healthy.
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Preventative health set to be only winner - Tasmania Examiner

Preventative health set to be only winner - Tasmania Examiner | Health Promotion and The Ottawa Charter | Scoop.it
Sky News Australia
Preventative health set to be only winner
Tasmania Examiner
By ROSEMARY BOLGER. May 22, 2013, 10:45 p.m..
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Kidney health week: kidney disease often goes unchecked

Kidney health week: kidney disease often goes unchecked | Health Promotion and The Ottawa Charter | Scoop.it
Despite one in three Australians being at high risk of kidney disease, the chronic illness remains low on the health radar of many people, chief executive of Kidney Health Australia, Anne Wilson says.
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