Health Innovation
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Can Health be gamified by technology?

Can Health be gamified by technology? | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
One could argue Foursquare (a geolocation mobile app that allows users to “check in” to places) catupluted the concept of gamification into the limelight. They did so with two examples of game mechanics: awarding a mayorship to users that check into a place the most often and badges to reward arbitrary achievments such checking into 10 pizza joints. Since then, a slew of apps, even business related, have mimicked the trend including Untappd (badges for beer lovers) and Right Bonus (translate empoyee awarded recognition points to hand out cash bonuses).

So, why the hoopla? ...
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Matthieu Lebas's comment, June 28, 2011 8:11 AM
Interesting, i'm currently leading a project that consists in assessing the potential of gamification in education, and, in fine, in motivation management within lucrative organizations. Thanks for this one
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You Said It: 'I'm Pretty, Definitely Addicted' to Technology

You Said It: 'I'm Pretty, Definitely Addicted' to Technology | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
UMD social scientists say there's a reason they call it a 'Crackberry.' Could you go cold turkey?

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iPad anatomy app that could replace a textbook? IMAIOS Mobile Atlas gets significant update

iPad anatomy app that could replace a textbook? IMAIOS Mobile Atlas gets significant update | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
IMAIOS’ mobile application is an atlas of human anatomy for iOS which we reviewed just two months ago.

Although we were impressed, and in fact considered it one of the best anatomy apps in the app store, there were some key drawbacks. The app however has just received a major update fixing many of the issues we encountered and here we will be giving you our second impression.

Our most important gripes with the initial version were the lack of an iPad version, the high price, and the constant need for an internet connection for the subscription-based app. The update addresses all of these issues to some extent.
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Mobile app helps doctors diagnose strokes

Mobile app helps doctors diagnose strokes | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
When a patient suffers an acute stroke, the outcome often rests on how quickly they receive expert care.

Now, by using a medical application for the iPhone or Android, doctors don't need to be at a hospital to diagnose a stroke patient and begin prescribing treatment.

Specialists can determine how to treat strokes based on brain-scan images reviewed from their smartphones with nearly the same accuracy as when they use a full diagnostic workstation, according to a study by researchers at the University of Calgary.
"Now they can bring a distant expert to bear on the problem," said Ross Mitchell, a medical professor at the Canada university who worked on the study. "There's huge, huge rewards to be had here."

Medical experts have been skeptical about using a 3.5-inch screen, like the one on an iPhone, for emergency diagnoses. But thanks to advancements in image compression, microprocessors and wireless-data bandwidth, the smartphone may prove to be, like beepers, an essential tool for on-the-go doctors.

The app is called ResolutionMD Mobile and can be downloaded via the App Store for the iPhone and iPad or on the Android Market for phones running Google software. It's already being used by some neuro-radiological specialists at hospitals in Europe, said Byron Osing, the CEO of Calgary Scientific.
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That's Dr. Watson, to you

That's Dr. Watson, to you | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
Instead of man versus machine (like the Jeopardy showdown), the makers of Watson, the supercomputer, are toying with how machine can help man - at the hospital.

After defeating his human rivals champions Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter on Jeopardy earlier this year , Watson, the trivia-question answering supercomputer, is on a new task.

Watson, which has been in development for years, has the processing power of 2,800 "powerful computers," as a major advancement in machines' efforts to understand human language. It juggles dozens of lines of reasoning at once and tries to arrive at a smart answer.

Medical staff at Columbia University Medical Center and the University of Maryland School of Medicine are seeing if Watson could interact with health workers to help with the diagnosis and treatment of patients.
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Patient Elects to Have Hand Amputated to Make Way for a Bionic One

Patient Elects to Have Hand Amputated to Make Way for a Bionic One | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
A Serb living in Austria has elected to have his hand amputated so that he can be fitted with a working bionic limb. The 26-year-old Milo’s biological hand was intact but useless, as a nerve injury stemming from a motorcycle accident ten years ago robbed him of feeling and movement in that extremity. Now, an Austrian doctor--not without controversy--has amputated Milo’s hand and is replacing it with a robotic version that responds to nerve signals in his forearm.

Milo lost his hand function...
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Stem-Cell Therapy Works Wonders for Race Horses; Are Human Treatments Next?

Stem-Cell Therapy Works Wonders for Race Horses; Are Human Treatments Next? | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
Over the course of the three races at this year’s Triple Crown, the odds are 10 to 1 that at least one horse will suffer a career-ending injury. “Orthopedically, the horse is a disaster waiting to happen,” says veterinarian Bob Harman. “They’re so big--a 1,000-pound animal on little toothpick legs--and they’re working at high capacity.” Harman is also the CEO of Vet-Stem, a California company that treats racehorses with stem-cell therapy. Since he founded Vet-Stem in 2002, his company has treated 4,141 horses for soft-tissue injuries such as tendinitis and muscle contusions, and he says 70 to 80 percent have healed completely.

Doctors generally reserve stem-cell therapy, which draws on those cells’ unique ability to regenerate and form into nearly any tissue, for patients with major medical problems, such as cancer and spinal-cord injuries...
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Smarter contact lenses. Through a lens, digitally

Smarter contact lenses. Through a lens, digitally | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
Researchers are adding radio-powered sensors, drug-delivering systems and wireless digital displays to contact lenses. Click the article here...
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New smartphone health application helps better manage prescription medications

Canadian consumers want more education and options for health self-management. A Deloitte consumer study found 54 per cent of those surveyed* are trying to learn how to prevent health problems and improve their well-being, and they want electronic tools to help them do so. Now consumers can access DrugHub, Great-West Life's new, free health application for iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch, which they can personalize with their prescription information to help manage their prescription medications.

"Managing prescription drug usage can be complex, particularly for people with chronic health conditions or who require multiple medications...
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MIT center to develop new health technologies

A new center that aims to develop technologies that will help to improve the access and cost of healthcare delivery is being launched by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

MIT announced the creation of the Medical Electronic Device Realization Center (MEDRC), in collaboration with Analog Devices, Inc. (ADI) and GE Global Research.

The new center will aim to create revolutionary improvements in multiple areas of the medical industry, including electronic devices, diagnostics and treatments, and technologies to enable information-driven health-care systems.
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9 implants that make your healthy body even more useful

9 implants that make your healthy body even more useful | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
Here's a list of 9 ways you can modify your body to be even more useful, from bionic implants to portable power generators.
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Ford Wants Your Next Car to Monitor Your Vital Signs as You Drive

Ford Wants Your Next Car to Monitor Your Vital Signs as You Drive | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
Within the next couple years, your car will notice if you have low blood sugar and tell you to have a snack; check local pollen counts and roll up your windows to prevent an allergy attack; and at lunch time, give you directions to the nearest healthy-eating establishment, pausing your iPod to broadcast the restaurant’s menu.

Using a suite of new apps Ford announced Wednesday, personalized medicine could soon be as simple as revving your engines. Now we just need someone to record some lines as KITT.

Ford is working with three medical technology firms to build web-connected apps for its Sync onboard communications interface. The programs are still in the research stages and won’t make it to market for at least a year or two...
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Controversial Blood Test To Predict How Long You Will Live

Controversial Blood Test To Predict How Long You Will Live | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
A new test set to hit the market in Britain in the next year aims to tell patients how long they have to live, and naturally that’s not happening without controversy. The test measures a person’s telomeres, those structures found on the tips of chromosomes. The length of telomeres apparently correlates with how fast a person is aging biologically, and hence researchers want to offer individuals some insight into just how much longer their bodies can hold up.

Well, some researchers do. Others aren’t so sure it’s a great idea. The test, developed at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, will be marketed via the company Life Length, which is in talks with medical diagnostics companies across Europe. When it goes on sale next year it will cost roughly $700...
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